Questions & Answers
Please make sure that your post is a question about the product. Edit your question or post anyway.
Sort: Most Helpful first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 30 questions
1
vote
The rings can be seen on Saturn, the bands on Jupiter, and the Great Red Spot. You can make out the reddish hue on Mars, but don't expect to see the ice caps. On a clear night you can see this items fairly clearly. The moon has some excellent detail in it, but that's not too difficult to achieve. You can also view some star clusters nicely as well. The Great Red Spot "can" be resolved if you have a sharp enough focus and clear enough night. The double cluster looks fantastic.
May 22, 2014 by G. Funk
0
votes
Yes, the gps can be purchased and used with this scope. The SLT series scopes are Alt-Az mounted and don't require EQ tracking. Hope this helps.
Aug 4, 2013 by jd67890
0
votes
I'm sorry, but that's a question for Celestron. They know their stock and specs, I don't. Try writing them. I have found they are pretty good at customer service and inquiries. Sorry I couldn't be more help.
Apr 12, 2014 by R. V. Wendel
0
votes
Yes. All lenses and filters are for a 1.25 in. scope such as the Nexstar 130 SLT. I also use it on other scopes, e.g., the Celestron 9.25 SCT. The case is well padded and has room for additional lenses and filters.
Aug 14, 2013 by llabarre
0
votes
I don't beleive Newtownians are good for land viewing. Refractor scopes are much better as "spy Glasses". Refractor scopes are the conventional type that have a glass lense on each side, not mirrors like Newtonians. As always, don't pay attention to the magnification claims for power. Look at primary lense diameter. The bigger the lense, the more light and the more detail of what you're looking at.
Dec 15, 2013 by Tom H.
0
votes
A decent 1.25" laser columating eyepiece is fine. Expect to spend about $50 - $75 for one but they make alignment very fast and easy, and it makes a big difference in the quality of the images you see. Also, at some point, save up for a really good eyepiece as the ones supplied with this scope are standard issue (meaning not all that great.) Especially if you want good view of the moon, saturn, and Jupiter. Also, spend the $25 or so to get a moon filter, which only transmists about 12% of the light. It'll keep you from being "blinded" while looking at the full moon, In any case, enjoy the scope!
Jan 1, 2014 by R. V. Wendel
0
votes
It's very easy to use - but setting up the auto tracking takes a little bit of work - note that you don't ha r to use the auto tracker, you can just use the remote like a game console and move the scope that way. Everything is as simple as point and view - the laser view finder helps find the little guys in the sky.
May 19, 2014 by James A Widner
0
votes
No. Every time you use the telescope after turning it off you must enter the following: current time and date and time zone. If you get a GPS based telescope this apparently gets rid of all those requisites.
Jan 14, 2014 by Raj
0
votes
Yes. You need the Celestron RS-232 adapter (http://www.amazon.com/Celestron-Nexstar-232-Interface-Cable/dp/B0000665UZ/ref=sr_1_1) and appropriate software to control the telescope. I use Stellarium (http://www.stellarium.org/) to control my 130SLT and it's pretty easy to set up...though the software itself has a bit of a learning curve. If you don't have a serial port on your computer, you'll also require a USB to serial adapter such as Celestron's (http://www.amazon.com/Celestron-USB-to-RS-232-Converter/dp/B0006O4DR6/ref=sr_1_2). Oh, and on a side note, you will also need to align the telescope as you normally would. That's because the telescope works in declination and right ascension instead of altitude and azimuth. You can use a GPS adapter (http://www.amazon.com/Celestron-SkySync-Accessory-Computerized-Telescopes/dp/B0040H2LWE/ref=sr_1_2), though I just use a GPS application on my cell phone. Set your location on GPS latitude and longitude for best results with the telescope...I learned that the hard way.
Aug 20, 2013 by Kaze
0
votes
I have the Meade version, but with the proper camera adapter. I'm sure it can handle the camera. Nebulas, that's a little tricky, you can, but you need very dark conditions. Far from city light pollution. The tracking has to be exact, this you will pick up pretty quickly. I've seen Neptune, not perfectly clear, but clear enough to photograph. I use a CCD Camera, 10 mp. I could clearly make out the blueish color and clouds, that seem to be moving extremely fast. Put it this way, I don't think you'll be dissatisfied. But like I said the darker the better, that means no strong moonlight to. Hope this helps. Wishing you clear skies, and dark nights. You will also have to be leave the shutter open for an extended period of time. That's why I prefer CCD.
Sep 8, 2014 by Jack of all Trades, Master of None
‹ Previous   1   2   3   Next ›
 
Unanswered questions
Search Questions and Answers