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Cerebrum 2008: Emerging Ideas in Brain Science Paperback – April 15, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Dana Press (April 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932594337
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932594331
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,485,306 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A real intellectual treat...research findings seen not just in their raw state of discovery but in the far-reaching long term implications they have for health, society, and the future of creativity and innovation.”—Floyd E. Bloom, former editor of Science
 
(Floyd E. Bloom 2007-09-01)

More About the Author

I write books about science. Nature fascinates me, as does its history.

So far, I've written twelve books, including Parasite Rex and The Tangled Bank: An Introduction to Evolution. In addition to my books, I also write regularly about science for The New York Times, as well as for magazines including National Geographic and Wired. I've won awards for my work from the National Academies of Science and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. My blog, The Loom, is published by National Geographic Magazine (http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/blog/the-loom).

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on May 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
The way cognitive studies are going, this book's subtitle: "Emerging Ideas in Brain Science" suggest it should be published on a continuous roll of paper. New ideas in neurosciences seem to be occurring on a monthly, if not a weekly basis. This noteworthy collection is indicative of the challenge readers face in the effort to maintain the pace set by research in this field. These sixteen timely and well-presented essays cover more than just the mechanics of the brain. There are some serious social issues to be considered relating to the brain's capabilities and limitations.

Editor Cynthia Read provides us with a collection of new considerations in what we would normally deem "brain science". These include an article delving into a basic of brain operations - the neurotransmitter dopamine and the basal ganglia. Those who expound on human "free will" have two opportunities to review the topic. One is a debate by Mark Hallett and Paul McHugh which raises once again the issue of "personal responsibility" and how we make even political decisions. Those seeking clinical studies related to these issues should peruse Michael Frank's article closely, as he explains how the "pleasure transmitter" can influence our behaviour - particularly the forming of habits and blockages to establishing new ones.

Another chemical messenger, glutamate, is described as "the major signalling chemical in nature". An amino acid, it is both highly useful and highly destructive if released in dangerous amounts after a brain injury as explained by Vivian Teichberg and Luba Vikhanski. Therapies for this condition are being studied through a new class of drugs known as "biologics".
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Format: Paperback
The way cognitive studies are going, this book's subtitle: "Emerging Ideas in Brain Science" suggest it should be published on a continuous roll of paper. New ideas in neurosciences seem to be occurring on a monthly, if not a weekly basis. This noteworthy collection is indicative of the challenge readers face in the effort to maintain the pace set by research in this field. These sixteen timely and well-presented essays cover more than just the mechanics of the brain. There are some serious social issues to be considered relating to the brain's capabilities and limitations.

Editor Cynthia Read provides us with a collection of new considerations in what we would normally deem "brain science". These include an article delving into a basic of brain operations - the neurotransmitter dopamine and the basal ganglia. Those who expound on human "free will" have two opportunities to review the topic. One is a debate by Mark Hallett and Paul McHugh which raises once again the issue of "personal responsibility" and how we make even political decisions. Those seeking clinical studies related to these issues should peruse Michael Frank's article closely, as he explains how the "pleasure transmitter" can influence our behaviour - particularly the forming of habits and blockages to establishing new ones.

Another chemical messenger, glutamate, is described as "the major signalling chemical in nature". An amino acid, it is both highly useful and highly destructive if released in dangerous amounts after a brain injury as explained by Vivian Teichberg and Luba Vikhanski. Therapies for this condition are being studied through a new class of drugs known as "biologics".
Read more ›
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Marsha D. Benshir on March 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
Be prepared to learn more than you expected! This is a glimpse into the frontiers of brain science that will change your expectations of science and healthcare. The scientists who have contributed to this book are searching for and finding answers to questions that most doctors have yet to ask. After reading those chapters that interest you most you will start over and read it cover to cover.
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