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Certified Copy (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]


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Frequently Bought Together

Certified Copy (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] + Close-Up (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] + Like Someone in Love (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray + DVD)
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Editorial Reviews

The great Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami (Close-up) travels to Tuscany for a luminous and provocative romance in which nothing is as it appears. What seems at first to be a straightforward tale of two people played by Oscar-winning actress Juliette Binoche (Blue) and opera singer William Shimell getting to know each other over the course of an afternoon gradually reveals itself as something richer, stranger, and trickier: a mind-bending reflection on authenticity, in art as well as in relationships. Both cerebrally and emotionally engaging, Certified Copy (Copie conforme) reminds us that love itself is an enigma.

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New interview with director Abbas Kiarostami
  • Let’s See “Copia conforme,” an Italian documentary on the making of Certified Copy, featuring interviews with Kiarostami and actors Juliette Binoche and William Shimell
  • Trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film critic Godfrey Cheshire

  • Product Details

    • Actors: Juliette Binoche, William Shimell
    • Directors: Abbas Kiarostami
    • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Subtitled, Surround Sound, Widescreen
    • Language: English, French, Italian
    • Subtitles: English
    • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
    • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
    • Number of discs: 1
    • Rated: Unrated
    • Studio: Criterion Collection
    • DVD Release Date: May 22, 2012
    • Run Time: 106 minutes
    • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
    • ASIN: B007A9EG8G
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,284 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

    Customer Reviews

    I would not waste my time watching it if I had the choice to do it again.
    Amazon Customer
    There is more going on with these two that is explained but yet, these conflicts can be understood, because many of us have experienced these uncertainties as well.
    Dennis A. Amith
    I can't say this is a well made film - watch if you have nothing better to do with two hours of your life.
    Morica

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
    Note that this review is for the film itself, which I saw in theaters (twice); I'm waiting for the Criterion Edition to ship (May 22) before I pick up my own copy.

    An author on tour to promote his book has an apparently chance meeting with a French woman (Juliette Binoche), and their encounter proves to be something far more than casual. He proposes in his book that a copy, an imitation, is as good as the genuine article, and while he appears to confine his thesis to works of art, what follows suggests that she may be testing to see how far it extends to life itself. The latest film by celebrated Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami is also his first to be filmed outside of his native country. Starring Juliette Binoche (who took home the best actress award at Cannes for her stunningly enigmatic performance in this film), Certified Copy starts from a premise that promises an exotic love story, and gradually turns into a subtle and profound meditation on art, memory, truth, and identity.

    To give a quick sense of the feel of this remarkable film I might suggest it combines the conversational intimacy of Before Sunset and the intellectual intrigue of Last Year at Marienbad. The problem is that comparison makes this seem like a derivative work, that merely copies elements of established works. It's not. Like all of the works I've seen by Abbas Kiarostami, this is a true original. Or if its a copy, it's a genuine copy. It's a fascinating film, that I've seen twice now, and that I look forward to watching again, since I got even more from it the second time.
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    35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Mariela PS on June 2, 2011
    Format: Blu-ray
    Perhaps you remember the 1995 hit "Before Sunrise," with Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, where a couple of young strangers spend an evening together in Vienna, mostly talking about life and relationships?

    "Certified Copy" is a similar dialogue-driven film that takes place in a small village in Tuscany during the course of one day. It's the story of a middle-aged art dealer (Binoche) who invites a British author on tour (Shimel) for a day in the countryside. As the two visit the various museums, churches, and trattorias, and as their conversation progresses, we find there's more to the relationship than meets the eye, and from there the plot takes some completely unexpected turns.

    Despite what the trailer makes you believe, this is not a romantic movie about seduction; it's an intelligent and philosophical film about how our expectations affect our perspective, about originality and point of view. It's also a daring puzzle of a movie, and it engages you in the game without you even knowing it.

    Binoche is radiant in this film, showing emotions with every raised eyebrow, telling entire stories without saying a word. She actually puts a spell on you! And shifting effortlessly between English, French, and Italian, her charismatic persona drives this minimalistic film from one scene to the next.

    Like a good piece of art, "Certified Copy" gives you plenty of room to make your own interpretations, and like a good brain game, it will make you think, a lot.
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    41 of 48 people found the following review helpful By D. R. Greenfield on May 23, 2011
    Format: Blu-ray
    You thought you would be settling down to watch just another love story: distinguished, older English-speaking man meets younger, sexy European woman while on a trip to Italy, and romance follows predictably. Ostensibly, this is the way the movie begins; and you settle in, waiting for the first kiss, and waiting for the love story to unfold. But it does not unfold at all. Things just get strange and more complicated as the movie progresses. James Miller, a deeply cynical and emotionally cold writer, on a visit to Italy to promote his book, meets a charming French woman who wants to show him rural Tuscany, and to revisit the town where they were hastily married fifteen years ago.

    There are differing opinions as to what exactly transpires in this film. Certainly it's open to more than one interpretation. One is that James and the woman (Binoche), although initially not married or even acquainted, "take on" the roles of estranged husband and wife. This interpretation seems very unconvincing to me, since there is no motive as to why they should do this, nor why James should treat this charming and attractive woman in such a shabby way, if they were just playing roles. If they are only playing at being husband and wife, then what is the point of the movie?

    After viewing the film several times, it seemed clear to me that they had once been lovers, she had gotten pregnant, they had hastily married, then later separated from one another. The film (mostly) hangs together with this interpretation, but not entirely. There is one spot where James asks the woman "Where (or when) did you get married?", as if he has no idea that he is her husband. Also, James has no memory at all of their wedding night, or where they were married. Nor has he much interest in her young son.
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    17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Anigraphy on December 31, 2011
    Format: Amazon Instant Video
    So the theme is change through time and there are at least three stories in the plot, if not more. The director lashes out the magic of languages to change the lanscape of a love story. But because the actors haven't changed their look and age, I was first baffled, dazzled, too, by the illusion of time standing still for 15 years. After the movie, I realized, time changes here as well. In a nutshell, English tells the first story, how a man and woman get together. Then, Italian tells the second story where and when a married couple drifts apart, with a newly-wed couple in contrast and an older couple in comparison. Lastly, the third story, in French, tells the inevitable disillusion of all relationships. Men are inconstant and women fragile, or vice versa. That's how good this movie is. That's how rare and baffled this movie could be. Its scope is large and its audience preselected. Certified Copy is not for wiser viewers, nor for the inexperienced. I feel it is a movie for me, for middle-aged men and women who suffer their lives with attachment and detachment of love at the moment.
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    Certified Copy (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
    This item: Certified Copy (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
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