Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Chai, chai: Travels in Pl... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by ToyBurg
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have creases. The cover may have significant wear. There may be page curls. It is possible that there are heavy highlights or writing in this book. All pages are there and otherwise item is in good condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Chai, chai: Travels in Places Where You Stop but Never Get Off Paperback – September 21, 2009

4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.00
$4.58 $0.01

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
$20.00 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Chai, chai: Travels in Places Where You Stop but Never Get Off
  • +
  • Tamarind City
Total price: $45.00
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bishwanath Ghosh was born in Kanpur, in Uttar Pradesh, in 1970. As a journalist, he worked in New Delhi for eight years before moving to southern Indian in 2001 to join the New Indian Express Group in Chennai. At present he is an assistant editor with The Times of India at Chennai.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback: 214 pages
  • Publisher: Westland Limited; First edition (September 21, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9380032862
  • ISBN-13: 978-9380032863
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,836,742 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The subject matter of this book always has the danger of making sense only to a small section of readers - those readers who have lived in India at least for a couple of decades before the 1990s, have a love for trains in general, have an interest in the complexity of the Indian Railway network and been resident in one corner of India and had relatives or friends to visit in another far corner. It just so happens that I was one such and so I could simply sail through this book without needing any references. Nondescript railway stations across India like Itarsi, Jhansi, Mughal Sarai, Shoranur, Guntakal and Arakkonam are as familiar as Chennai and Mumbai to me. Prior to the late 1980s, Indian Railways did not run that many direct trains from one far corner of India to another. As a result, if one had to go to places like Gorakhpur from Cochin, one often had to wait long hours in one of these stations to connect to another train that would take them to their destination. I had done my share of these transfers.

Just like the author, I too have often wondered, waiting at Itarsi, looking out of my second class coach window at the emptiness that stared at me beyond the station, as to what this village or town could be all about. In that sense, the author has chosen a nice, off-beat topic to write about. But then, having chosen to travel to all these stations across India, he seems to have done no research at all about any of these wayside stations and the towns appended to them, prior to his departure. As a result, he arrives cold in each station with little idea as to whether there is anything special about them or what to do there after arrival.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As the byline of the book states, Bishwanath Ghosh travels around India visiting the railway stations that one passes through usually but never gets off. He starts from Mughal Serai in the north, covering Jhansi, Itarsi, Guntakal, Arakkonam, Jolarpettai and terminating his journey at Shoranur. While some stations such as Jhansi are towns in their own right, the rest are just railway towns; the life there
seems to revolve around the railway station. Ghosh has a chapter for each town he visits (only Arakkonam and Jolarpettai share a chapter) and the size of a chapter is vaguely proportional to the size of the town itself.

Ghosh’s narrative is light and transports one to the lanes of the place where he is at. While reading a few chapters, I felt an urge to be physically present at that place! Overall, the book serves as a good alternative travelogue to people who have traveled in India and are curious to know about the railway junctions they pass through in their journeys. The only thing that I found missing was the details of the Chai that is sold in these stations!

Cross posted at [...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a great book that languidly explores the cities behind the great railway "junctions" of India. For all of us who passed through Itarsi, Jhansi, Guntakal, Jolarpet and Miraj to name a few "great" junctions, the experience was one of hurriedly getting off from one train, establishing a sustained presence after some anxiety in another, securing a spot and then sauntering on to the platform to get some refreshments and reading materials.

In the days of non-computerized reservations, finding that place in the connecting train was an anxiety ridden experience. Not much thought was ever given to the junction as a city in its own right or the existence of a population that supported the life of that city. Bishwanath Ghosh actually alights from the train and heads out into those hidden cities behind the junctions to explore their life and soul.He does this in a very entertaining manner, taking us into the bowels of small restaurants, hotels and questionable lodging quarters.

I recommend this whole heartedly as a good read for anyone who has passed through those junctions - which is most of us who lived in one place and studied in another - constrained by the terms of the student concession tickets to seek connections at these railway "junctions" to ensure shortest route.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
The author has shortlisted some of the key stations that used to be transit points on long distance trains like Mughalsarai, Jhansi, Itarsi, Arakkonam, Jolarpettai, Shoranur and a couple of more places.

The journeys remind you of train travel in the '80's decade. Many of the places have changed in the recent past with the stations losing some of the prominence with the advent of electric locomotives and the decline of pantry service.

The author has tried listing down some anecdotes from each city visit. Some are memorable and some are thin on content. The constant reference to bars, booze and searching for a hotel tend to divert from the content.

The book makes for easy reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Chai, chai: Travels in Places Where You Stop but Never Get Off
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Chai, chai: Travels in Places Where You Stop but Never Get Off