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Challenger (Star Trek, New Earth, Book 6) Mass Market Paperback – August 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Series: Star Trek (Numbered Paperback) (Book 94)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Star Trek; 1st edition (August 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067104298X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671042981
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 1.1 x 4.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,504,166 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

"How could threat vessels get so close without tripping our sensors?"

"What do you expect from me? Look at the monitors. Completely gamma-seized."

"Then we better saddle up and learn to ride blind."

The sci-deck of Starfleet Cruiser Peleliu stank and smoldered. Part of the carpet was on fire, but nobody was bothering with it. Hot damage crawled like parasites through the mechanics under the sensor boards' tripolymer skin. Burst connections caused tiny volcanoes of acid in ripped-open sheeting. A third of the pressure pads and readouts had quit working or were crying for damage control.

Nick Keller swiped his uniform's dirty sleeve across his forehead, bent over the sensor boards, and tried to focus his stinging eyes. A fleck of insulation hung from a wing of his briar-patch-brown hair and blocked part of his view. For an hour they'd fielded attacks from enemies they couldn't see, couldn't target, and hadn't expected. How had any hostiles known they were on their way out to Belle Terre? Or was this some new enemy that nobody in Starfleet or out at the colony even knew about yet?

The question went unanswered. Sensors couldn't see through the bath of gamma radiation spewed by a pulsing neutron star so far away that even working long-range sensors wouldn't have picked it up.

Beside him, Tim McAddis dribbled sweat from his pale forehead onto the sensor dials. His blond hair glistened with a frost of perspiration. "I'm used to seeing things a solar system away, not a lousy five hundred yards. Now that our deflectors are on full, we can't even pick up phantom data like before."

It was a hard thing for a science officer to admit.

Keller pressed a hand to McAddis's hunched shoulder. "Look at the bright side. You'll get the blame instead of me."

McAddis grinned nervously. "The mighty second mate stands defiant."

A knock on the cold-molded lattice grid near his knee got Keller's attention. He found the first officer's reassuring face peering up from the command deck seven feet below, through the lattice fence that prevented crewmen or tools from falling under the sci-deck rail. "What've you two got up there? How'd they come up on us?"

Without a good explanation, Keller knelt to meet him under the rail and handed over the unhelpful truth. "Derek, they must've cruised in cold. No engines. Coasting, like the old days of rocketry. We were looking for exhaust signatures, not solid objects. All I can figure is the bad guys are accustomed to blackout action and know how to maneuver on inertia. Without engines, they're really invisible."

"Mr. Hahn," the communications officer interrupted, "sickbay reports thirty casualties."

"How many dead?" Derek Hahn asked.

"They just said casualties. I don't think they want to tell us."

Kneeling up here in only a pretense of seclusion, Keller gripped the rail at the tremor in Tracy Chan's voice. Everybody was shaken badly. They weren't even sure yet how many of their shipmates were dead. Suj Sanjai at tactical had been killed in the first hit less than an hour ago. That grim hello had brought in critical seconds of attack before the Peleliu got its shields up. Since then, the minutes had been long and bitter, landing percussion after percussion on them from unseen foes who understood better than Starfleet how to fight during Gamma Night.

"Phasers direct aft," the captain ordered. "Fire!"

Both Keller and Hahn looked at the command deck.

Staccato phaser fire spewed from the aft array, at targets no one could see, jolting the ship much more than normal. That was the damage speaking. The cruiser convulsed under Keller's knee.

Keeping his voice low, he murmured, "What's he targeting? He can't possibly know where they are."

Hahn shook his head, but said nothing. He watched Captain Roger Lake, stalking the center deck.

From up here on the half-circle balcony, Keller clearly saw the command arena below except for the turbolift. The science and engineering balcony where he knelt rested on top of the lift's tube structure, a design meant to maximize use of the cruiser's support skeleton. Two narrow sets of ladder steps, one to his left and the other to his right, curved down to the command deck on either side of the lift doors. Below, Crewman Makarios at the helm and Ensign Hurley at nav both hunched over their controls, staring at the main viewscreen, which stubbornly showed them only a static field interrupted every twenty seconds or so by a grainy flash of open space, fed by McAddis's tedious attempts to clear the sensors. The largest screen on the bridge -- on any Starfleet bridge -- was their window to eternity. The two fellows at the helm were hoping for a lucky glimpse of the attackers, maybe get off a clean shot with full phasers.

To port of the helm the half-demolished tactical station was still unmanned, with Captain Lake's stocky form haunting it as he tried to keep one eye on the main screen. Why hadn't he called for somebody to replace Sanjai? Why was he so moody?

To starboard, Chan's communications console was the only board on the bridge that had so far evaded damage, either direct or repercussive. Everybody else was struggling just to make things work at half capacity. Those first hits had done some nasty work.

Up here the engineering console on the balcony's starboard side beeped madly, reporting dozens of damaged sites all over the ship, but there was no one to answer. The engineers had split for their own section as soon as the attack came, and behind him the environmental and life-support board went wanting too. Keller and McAddis were up here alone.

Almost alone.

The sci-deck offered a certain amount of privacy. Sound insulation and clever design of the ceiling shell prevented travel of much conversation from up here to the lower deck, where command conversations were also taking place. The two sections, then, could be functionally close, but not interrupt each other. Usually, Keller liked it up here. This was second-officer territory if ever there had been any. During this voyage, though, an added presence haunted the upper deck.

He glanced to his right.

There she was. That Rassua woman, Zoa, along for the haul. A cross between an ambassador and an inspector, she wasn't in Starfleet, but she was here most of the time anyway, fulfilling her mission of "determining whether the Federation is up the standards of the Rassua."

She stood on the upper deck as if someone had leaned an ancient Egyptian sarcophagus against the console, both legs braced, her gold face and thick hair in a waterfall of severe skinny plaits, her lined lips giving nothing away. In the months of travel, Keller had only heard her voice a couple of times. If she was any indication, the Rassua weren't talkative.

Dressed in woven strips of leather that left her heavily tattooed shoulders bare, Zoa was markedly disparate from the Starfleet crew in their black trousers and brick-red jackets. If only she had boots on. Instead, she wore only some kind of crisscross thong sandals with thick soles, allowing her two-inch toenails to curve down like a hawk's talons hooked over a branch.

And she never moved her face. Her blue-dot eyes followed the crew action here and below. It was like having a sphinx watch every move they made. Keller wished he could order her off the bridge. Roger Lake wanted her here. He liked showing off to an alien who was being courted by the Federation. The UFP wanted the Rassua alliance to guard their zenith borders.

So here she was, observing. If they got out of this, she'd have a real story for somebody back home.

Keller had hoped she'd get the hint and go below when the battle started, but apparently this was what she'd been waiting for all along and she wasn't about to leave. He tried to ignore her. His skull throbbed.

Derek Hahn reached u

Customer Reviews

I think this series has plodded along for too long already.
Karissa Clark
Back in form with her usual style of writing, "Challenger" is a true joy to read as the pacing is "dead on" and the story just flows.
K. Wyatt
I wasn't real crazy about what I would consider to be a deus ex machina ending, but once the story got going it kept my attention.
Coach Carter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A. KAPLAN on September 9, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book with two frames of mind. On the one hand, I wanted it to satisfy as a fun Star Trek adventure, and as the wrap-up to the New Earth story. On the other, I knew that Challenger was designed to set up a potential spin-off series featuring an all-new ship and crew, along the lines of Peter David's Star Trek New Frontier series (which I have just started reading and enjoying). So, with that in mind . . .
Challenger seemed to get off to a real slow start. I was about a quarter of the way through the book before I got hooked. Once that happened, however, I was very hooked indeed. Diane Carey managed to take a number of seemingly unrelated elements from across the various New Earth books and brought them together in a fairly satisfying way. I don't think this makes the book the ideal jumping-on point, but enough is explained that readers who just want to see how the Challenger adventures start shouldn't feel too lost.
If I hadn't known that this was a sort of pilot for Challenger, I would probably have been disappointed at the somewhat minimal role that Kirk, Spock, and the Enterprise take. However, once the future crew of the Challenger finally started taking center stage, those thoughts vanished. Ms. Carey has put together a collection of colorful, likeable characters. With a healthy mix of Starfleet officers, civilians, and aliens, things should be diverse and interesting enough for a long while. Here's hoping we see more of these folks in the future!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Karissa Clark on July 24, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I think this series has plodded along for too long already. I snatched this book right away, because I wanted to know what happened, but the story line just keeps dragging on. Now that someone else has come to take care of Belle Terre I think the Enterprise should be able to leave more easily.
The best part of this book was not the plot, but the writing. It sounded like reading an old Western novel. Worth a try, but don't get too excited.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Yanni on February 6, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As usual, Diane Carey comes up with a very good storyline. As usual, her word choice is somewhat awkward and clumsy from trying too hard to use the language creatively. Unlike her usual fare, however, in this case, it's just somewhat awkward, not flat-out wrong most of the time; other than a few too many typos (which is hardly unusual these days in mass-market paperbacks; it's hardly unique to Diane Carey) there were very few instances in this book where I could say with absolute confidence that the word she had chosen was the WRONG word for what she was trying to convey, although there were still numerous times when I found her word choice jarring.

The only other major flaw that I have to quibble about is one that I should have been commenting on for the entire series, but it only really struck me in this book: they make such an issue out of being sensor blind during "gamma night", and how dangerous it is to move the ship during that time. Certainly, it would be an unneccessary risk at most times, and therefore one that it would be foolish to take. But in an emergency (say, while under attack) it would certainly be worth the risk, given that (as is pointed out in an unrelated discussion in the book) space is so vast, and so, for the most part, EMPTY, that entire galaxies can pass through one another without collision. As such, the odds of actually running into something large enough to get past the navigational deflectors while flying blind is about as likely as, say, being killed by a Siberian Tiger while walking the steets of Des Moines.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Coach Carter on February 13, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'd classify this as a typical Diane Carey novel--roughly 50% longer than it needs to be and full of unnecessary and confusing sailor lingo. Diane also seemed to switch between writing styles, writing at times almost as one would speak.

The story itself was decent and did a nice job of wrapping everything up and setting up for a potential new series (that never really materialized). I wasn't real crazy about what I would consider to be a deus ex machina ending, but once the story got going it kept my attention.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
After more or less trudging my way through the first novel in the New Earth series, "Wagon Train to the Stars" where, quite uncharacteristically, Diane Carey's writing just didn't mesh and had nothing but pacing problems, "Challenger" brought about a quite welcome relief. Back in form with her usual style of writing, "Challenger" is a true joy to read as the pacing is "dead on" and the story just flows. I particularly enjoyed the fact that she carried the main plot and two sub plots in this story and brought all three of them together for a somewhat anticlimactic, but highly intriguing conclusion.
The cover art for "Challenger" is perfect, as was the cover art for the entire series.
The premise:
Shaking off the events of the previous novel "Thin Air," Captain Kirk and crew are quite expectant as their relief is on its way in the form of the USS Peleliu, who are expected to stand as the Starfleet authority in the Occult system for the next two years.
As the USS Peleliu is headed for Belle Terre though, she is suddenly attacked by the All Kauld, during gamma night, and her captain, Roger Lake starts showing signs of mentally cracking after he'd been exposed to an undetectable virus, some time before this mission began. Weakened but not destroyed, the Peleliu comes limping into the Occult system. The first officer was also killed, leaving the second officer, Lieutenant Nick Keller, to deal with the problems set before him; a nearly destroyed Starship and a mentally unstable captain.
At Belle Terre, Captain Kirk and Spock are dealing with a whole new issue; mysterious, inter-dimensional probes that are impervious to phaser fire are taking the quantum olivium and stuffing it back into the Quake moon.
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