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Chancellorsville And Gettysburg (Campaigns of the Civil War) Paperback – March 22, 1994


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Product Details

  • Series: Campaigns of the Civil War
  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press (March 22, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0306805499
  • ISBN-13: 978-0306805493
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,758,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gary W. Gallagher, who wrote the introduction for this edition, is the author of a biography of Stephen Dodson Ramseur, and has edited a number of books on the Civil War, including Fighting for the Confederacy: The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Todd E. Newman on April 25, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Being a fan of both battles I felt I owed it to myself to finally read this book. I was skeptical at first, although I was after the opinion and personal insight from Doubleday. I was disappointed after several pages to see that what I was reading was more so a quick history or study of the battles instead of insight from Doubleday himself. Now, at times Doubleday did offer his opinion or toughts about a particular movement or fight, but rarely did talk about his own personal involvement. This is what I was hoping to read and found myself reading a quick rundown of events concerning these two famous battles. Seldom did Doubleday offer what he was thinking or desired to explain his reasons for his actions. Doubleday is vague at times and skips key elements occasionally to make this book appear quite short of information. For anyone looking to understand the battles, I suggest authors like Stephen Sears, James McPherson or Harry Pfanz. I can't recommend this book because Doubleday is very brief and at the same time rarely brings in his insight to make this book interesting.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Duchesneau on September 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have only read the Gettysburg portion of this book. Abner Doubleday presents a high-level, general's view of the battle, written 20 years later. Movements of large units are described, with very few vignettes of how savage the fighting was. The wounds of his fellow generals are, however, detailed. This book will be difficult for the novice Civil War reader. If you are unfamiliar with the terms regiment, brigade, division, and corps as they were organized in the Civil War, you will probably not appreciate this book. Doubleday does provide detailed, day-by-day order of battle information for both sides in an appendix. Those unfamiliar with the organization of both sides will have to refer to it frequently. There is a detectable bias against Union general Oliver O. Howard, and some antipathy towards General Meade, the overall Union commander, largely because Doubleday was demoted from a battlefield command position he had assumed on the death of his corps commander. Doubleday also provides much less detail after the first day, because only on the first day were his units involved in heavy fighting. If you're looking for an account of the general course of Gettysburg down to the brigade level, this is the book. If you're looking for excitement, you'll have to go elsewhere. It should be noted that there is slim evidence that Abner Doubleday had anything to do with the invention of baseball. However, he did win a Medal of Honor at Gettysburg.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark on November 4, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Obviously, I don't quite agree with some other reviewers here. Whatever his motives, Doubleday's criticism of Mead, Sickles, and others are widely accepted.

Gettysburg is supposedly the greatest Union victory of the war - and yet paradoxically Lincoln was disgusted with Meade's defensive victory that allowed Lee to escape. Lee's army had not been routed or driven from the field. After Pickett's disastrous charge, Lee waited an entire day for Meade's counterattack that never came. Lee was obliged to leave Pennsylvania primarily because his ammunition was near exhausted by the battle. Union ammunition was easily replenished, while their army blocked Lee's supply line to Virginia.

One of the most overlooked causes of the war, I personally suspect, is that no one on either side had any clue as to how prolonged, bloody, and frustrating a struggle lay ahead. Doubleday and other authors of this series try to convey an understanding of why this was so, and why the war persisted for so long.

This book was part of a series of twelve originally published in 1882-85. The occasion was Congress had finally gathered up and made public complete government records of the war - including actual dispatches between commanders. Prior to this people writing memoirs said pretty much what they pleased, as did many historians. Suddenly here were the official records, which proved a smoking gun that settled many a dispute.

Scribners sought the most qualified veterans or experts to each write a volume on a particular campaign incorporating this new information. The books were succinct (about 250 pages each), intended as a quick read for the general public. And still excel at this to the present day.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Virgil Lawson on May 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read an original copy 30 years, just want to read it again, but the library were I got it is now gone
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