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Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy Paperback – October 18, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Kaplan Publishing; 1ST edition (October 18, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607144417
  • ISBN-13: 978-1607144410
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #766,980 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

 “…a smart, easy-to-read overview of the weaknesses of colleges and universities and the benefits of the fast-growing private-sector colleges…While this book will not quiet all the critics, it effectively identifies weaknesses in both the nonprofit and the public sectors and should stimulate college presidents to reconsider some of their priorities.” —School Library Journal

 “Presently, this may be the subject of snide editorials and contemptuous hearings, but Rosen envisions a day when for-profit learning centers step up and fill the education gap much in the same way “land grant” and community colleges did in years past. The alternative, he fears, spells trouble for American supremacy in education.” —Kirkus Reviews
“Andrew Rosen has written a great new book on higher education in America, Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy.  It is provocative, insightful, and mostly correct. Yet, I predict, it will be largely ignored by the higher-education community.”  —Richard Vedder, Innovations blog for The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Americans know that our primary and secondary schools are woefully under-performing but believe our colleges and universities are second to none.  Andy Rosen blows a big hole in that belief, showing that, just when we need to grow the number of students getting a high-quality post-secondary education, our state universities are in financial distress and our private schools are quickly becoming too costly for all but the wealthy.  This is a must-read book for those who care about fixing our nation's higher education problems before they become intractable." —Former New York City Schools Chancellor, Joel Klein

About the Author

Andrew S. Rosen is chairman and CEO of Kaplan, Inc., one of the world’s largest and most diverse education organizations.  Throughout his career, Rosen has pioneered new approaches to education with a focus on student achievement and success. He is an outspoken advocate for adult learners, and a frequent speaker on the challenges facing higher education in a knowledge economy.  Mr. Rosen holds an A.B. degree from Duke University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. 

More About the Author

Andrew S. Rosen is chairman and CEO of Kaplan, Inc., one of the world's largest and most diverse education organizations. Throughout his career, Rosen has pioneered new approaches to education with a focus on student achievement and success. He is an outspoken advocate for adult learners, and a frequent speaker on the challenges facing higher education in a knowledge economy. Mr. Rosen holds an A.B. degree from Duke University and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

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Customer Reviews

This is a valuable book written from a unique perspective.
Richard B. Schwartz
This book is nothing better than a glorified promotional campaign for Rosen's for-profit "educational" industry.
Katie Luther
That's the main thing you should know when you read this book.
Yours Truly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Theresa Welsh on December 4, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Is the rise of for-profit colleges in the United States a good thing for the American people? You know, the ones that advertise heavily and are often located in malls or office buildings (like the University of Phoenix)? That's the basic question this book attempts to answer.

The author of this book is Chairman and CEO of Kaplan, Inc, the parent company of a for-profit university, Kaplan University. As you might expect, he makes a case that colleges such as the one he runs ARE good for the country; that they make education accessible to non-traditional students at less overall cost, and make a big contribution to the national goal of a more educated population. The students they attract are typically lower-income, older people who may be working full-time and have spouses and children, whose focus is on getting a better job with more pay. Rosen says colleges like Kaplan deliver, providing the kind of skills that employers are looking for.

I found this book to be very well written and remarkably balanced in its presentation, and I learned some things I didn't realize about how American institutions of higher learning are financed. Even with the exorbitant tuition charged today, these payments are just a small part of the real cost. I didn't realize how much of the funding for public colleges comes from the government, directly, not just through student loans...and how fragile this funding can be. During hard times, when more people turn to educational institutions to improve their job skills, these colleges often have fewer slots for new students.

The heavily endowed, high-prestige private universities don't worry about whether they can take more students. They only want the cream of the crop of young people just coming out of high school.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By In Mikes Humble Opinion on October 17, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Thought provoking but accessible narrative on the critical issues behind one of the most challenging concerns of the time. Why did higher education evolve to its present state and how can we reach the goal of measurable learning outcomes and assured value for the student, the taxpayer and society.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
I've been involved with higher education for many, many years. Through my undergraduate years at a prestigious private university, graduate school at a large public university, and several teaching jobs at small liberal arts colleges I've been exposed to almost all aspects of this sector of the economy. Over this time I've become increasingly disillusioned with the overall ability of the higher educational institutions to provide meaningful, effective, and affordable education. American colleges and universities are still the best ones in the world by most objective criteria, but their outmoded and recalcitrant adherence to the model of education where the prestige of an institution is more valuable than its ability to educate the students will eventually catch up with them. Most colleges and universities are engaged in a heedless arms race with each other, oftentimes over criteria that don't have any direct t impact on student education. All of this would not be such a big issue were it not for an exponential growth in the price of tuition and accommodations at such institutions. Students and Taxpayers are increasingly asked for a larger and larger contribution to the overall bill. Unfortunately, this straddles individuals, states, and the federal government with unreasonably high expenditures that are part of the growing debt problem. The current system of higher education is unsustainable in a long run, and in Change.edu Andrew Rosen tries to give a few suggestions for the solution to this mounting problem.

Andrew Rosen is chairman and CEO of Kaplan. He himself is a product of elite higher education, but as someone who has now worked in "for-profit" educational environment for many years he has picked up many valuable insights about the nature and structure of this form of education.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The author of this book, Andrew S. Rosen, is the chairman and CEO of Kaplan, Inc., a business which might be familiar to many readers. It not only offers academic testing programs for students across the country but also Kaplan University's online program.

NONE of this takes away from the important messages in this book. In fact, Rosen has been in a unique position to see the gaps between what students want - and need - to learn versus what is offered to them. In particular, lower income students have less access to an education which allows them a chance at actual employment. With limited finances, are they forced to work at inadequate jobs, poorly paid, for a lifetime? In addition to this, Rosen reveals how supposedly "affordable" colleges are raising tuition and other expenses by trying to compete with the most expensive colleges. Do these universities really need non-academic luxuries to draw students? Shouldn't they be allocating the lion's share of their funds towards better educational programs and top college professors?

That is a major focus of this book and I also found the section on the histories of Cornell, Purdue, etc to be fascinating. They were formed when a higher education was not taken for granted and only a relatively small percentage of the population went to college. How they have evolved and affected so many other colleges! Rosen's book is a call to action and a chance for readers to think about the true mission of a quality education.

Whether students study online or not, the points made by the author are valid.
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