Customer Reviews


12 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Here's A How-De-Doo"
Gilbert and Sullivan's song from 'The Mikado' has a firm place in the appreciation of this book CHANGING THE CONVERSATION by the well-informed, thoughtful and caring mind of financial advisor Gary Klaben. In almost any gathering of people - from family to business group to social group - the inevitable groan comes up of 'how do we survive this mess in which we are...
Published on October 20, 2010 by Grady Harp

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More Of A Philosophical Approach to Money ... Not A Practical Money Managment Book
I don't usually review books about financial planning or money management because this isn't the type of book I seek out. However, when Rebecca from The Cadence Group asked me if was interested in reviewing Gary Klaben's Changing the Conversation, she shared the following descriptions of the book:

"Through a series of chapter "conversations" about client...
Published on January 11, 2011 by Jennifer


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Here's A How-De-Doo", October 20, 2010
By 
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
Gilbert and Sullivan's song from 'The Mikado' has a firm place in the appreciation of this book CHANGING THE CONVERSATION by the well-informed, thoughtful and caring mind of financial advisor Gary Klaben. In almost any gathering of people - from family to business group to social group - the inevitable groan comes up of 'how do we survive this mess in which we are plodding through?' Well, finally someone has taken the time to address the general level of anxiety about the recession and the failure of government in plugging the holes that seem to multiply by the day if not the minute. The pleasure of reading Klaben's well-written book is his desire to outline the 'journey from dependency to mastery, from self-discovery to multigenerational financial and family realization'.

Klaben moves us from examining our sins of consumerism (no, not that consumerism is a sin, but focus on it as the end all to qualify success and happiness is) to taking charge of making a difference in the manner in which we structure our own destinies. 'Americans own the role of rugged individualism in the world. We seek out new ideas without the restraints seen in other authoritarian cultures that can snatch away freedoms at any moment for any reason. By the early 1980s, the erstwhile hippies and draft dodgers were wearing business sits and holding down positions of authority they had rejected earlier.' He goes on to reiterate that American institutions have disappointed us, that we now have a capitalism revolution. Who's to blame? It is far easier to point the finger at the government officials who are overwhelmed at present with crisis traffic as never before. If we are to survive - and Klaben is confident that we will survive! - then we must change our attitude and our methods of communication and relating. In the author's introductory words, 'This book will look at how wealth and money find their way into our lives, both literally and viscerally.....Learning, earning and yearning is a life journey of discovery.....This book's intent: Through each cycle of your life, to help you wisely anticipate life's inevitable changes and, by understanding the changing role of money over time, find both financial growth and personal satisfaction.'

And off we go on a ride through Gary Klaben's smart train of thought to alter the way we perceive and utilize money, the planning of a time when we CAN actually retire, and how to live through this crisis and be prepared for the crises to come, emerging as a more informed and better adjusted member of the global family of man. It sounds a bit pretentious to say that Klaben makes good on his introductory promises, but read this book and learn more about coping and gaining control of your life in this crazy time and you will be convinced that here is a man who can put everything into perspective. A very handsome guide, this. (Note that the cover of this book pictures the Tree of Life!) Grady Harp, October 10
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shifting Your Focus, October 13, 2010
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
There is a growing awareness that focusing on accumulating more and more material possessions does not result in an increased level of happiness. Gary Klaben, the author, has given us a series of essays which will help us change the way we think and talk about money, success and family matters.

First he explores the problems facing our nation and traces how we got into the situation we are in today. We are becoming more and more isolated as individuals. "One's real community is waning, and social trust continues to fade."

If we are to regain our momentum as a country it must start with reestablishing a strong family unit and a better sense of trust in our institutions. The aim of this book is to start conversations which will move us away from the narrow focus of materialism and toward a broader focus of community.

The book is based on Mr. Klaben's years of experience as a financial advisor and his own personal life's experiences. He shares many interesting stories from his professional work and his personal life.

There is a wealth of wisdom contained in these essays. We all need to get a better idea of what life is all about and focus more time and effort on living life to the fullest. These essays are a great way to change the conversation in your own mind and the conversations you are having with others.

There is a very good chapter on net worth. He makes a great point that net worth is not really your bank account or stock portfolio but the value you are contributing to the world.

Well worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Changing the Conversation by Gary Klaben: a Must-Read for Most of Us, October 17, 2010
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
Let's face it. Most of us probably "have issues" with money. Money oftentimes gets in the way when it should not. It has an enormous power over us. It causes dysfunctional behaviors, debauches, defiles, and demoralizes. In short, money can enslave us, if we let it become our master. (p. 267-74) In this book, which was written in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008, during the 2008-09 recession, Klaben (President, Owner, Financial Advisor, Coyle Asset Management, Glenview, IL; President, Protinus; Master of Science, Financial Services, The American College, 1995; Chartered Financial Consultant, The American College, 1989; Bachelor of Science, United States Military Academy, West Point, 1979), a renowned financial advisor and consultant, sets forth a "call to action" for individuals, families, and businesses, arguing that our conversations about money need to change, if Americans are to achieve a better future. (p. 33) Intending a "journey from dependency to mastery," the author compiles a series of "conversations" that are meant to function as a "how-to guide to financial realization" (p. 21), a comprehensive strategy for multigenerational financial security and well-being. Each "conversation" or chapter focuses on how individuals, families, businesses, and the world are changing. They were written to help us anticipate future changes, prepare to manage them, and even lead. (p. 32) Kleban discusses a variety of topics, not limited to financial awareness, KASH (knowledge, attitude, skills, and habits), choosing one's path, how the brain learns, setting goals, the psychology of money, the importance of financial mentors and mentoring, risk management, the significance of understanding and taming complexity, navigating life's storms and currents, retirement, true worth, property, passing wealth to future generations, and growing greatness. Sufficiently well-documented, based upon the notion of the three stages of life--youth (i.e. learning), middle age (i.e. earning), and old age (i.e. yearning)-- and filled with excellent advice, drawn from many of the author's own personal and professional experiences, this thought-provoking and noteworthy publication, dealing with the emotional (non-financial) aspects of money, will serve as a must-read for most of us and the precursor to transforming our financial livelihoods and legacies. (p. 282-3) Appealing to general and some specialized audiences, it is highly recommended for most public library book collections--C. A. Lajos, The Librarian's Review of Books
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Changing The Conversation Is Timely, January 26, 2011
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
Changing the Conversation : Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being
Author: Gary Klaben
304 pages
Navigator Press (October 1, 2010)

I agreed to read and review this book because I was a stockbroker for almost 30 years. The author Gary Klaben is a Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC) and possesses a MS in Financial Services. I was around when stockbrokers started financial planning by getting their Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation. A ChFC is a step up from CFP and requires passage of three more tests for a total of nine.

One day at the dog park, JD told a story of a husband and wife that wanted to distribute some assets for estate tax purposes. They had been farmers for many years, worked from sunup to sun down and had been fortunate. They decided to give $33,000 to their son each year at Christmas.

Well, when the son received his money, he immediately got married, traveled to Nepal, wined and dined his new wife and bought her a whole bunch of jewels. When he arrived back home he was immediately looking forward to Christmas again.

This year when he opened his present he found a shirt and a towel. His Mom said, "We got you the towel so you wouldn't get tears on your new shirt." It's hard for parents to see their hard work frittered away.

In truth, Klaben writes, we don't prepare our children and grand children to deal with money. The New Year seems an appropriate time to look at how we need to change the conversation about money.

Klaben argues that the financial products industry needs to change the conversation. Wall Street needs to change from creating products that extract money from the customers to one that is concerned with meeting their clients needs. "The consumer is now in the driver's seat." The new business needs to provide deep support. The need is for business or anyone in the service business to offer trusted expert advocacy in our complex world.

In the goal setting section, Klaben says that successful people have goals, write them down and are disciplined. They practice the necessary things to reach their goals. At this time of year what better question to answer is Klaben's:

"If we were meeting here three years from today, and we were to look back over those three years to today, what has to have happened during that period, both personally and professionally, for you to feel happy with your progress?"

Later, Klaben tells us how to reach our goals by breaking the goal down into small steps. He uses the example of wanting to run a marathon a year from now by breaking it down into three month goals and then into 30 day goals. You are forming a habit.

Gary Klaben is a refreshing throwback to an earlier time. In the chapter "Do the Correct Thing" he writes, " All the money and material possessions we pass on pale by comparison to what we stand for and how we conduct our life."

This is an excellent book and easy to read. The author fulfilled his intent to help you anticipate life's inevitable changes by understanding the role of money.

I encourage you to comment on this book review. Whoever writes the best comment will receive my copy of "Changing the Conversation" free.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Changing The Conversation is a guide book for life., October 9, 2010
By 
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
Changing The Conversation is a guide book for life. The purpose of this book is to give people the steps to transform their financial and family well being. Klaben implores that financial literacy begin at a young age. He explains the different phases of financial literacy for children. He gives parents a time line of when to introduce these phases to their kids. He also urges readers to constantly upgrade their knowledge throughout life and to make meaningful social connections with other people.

Gary Klaben is a former Army infantry officer. He later become a real estate agent and now is currently a financial consultant. I enjoy reading about Klaben's early life working in a Greek bakery as a teenager with people from different ethnic groups. The biographical part of the book is quite fun to read.

Gary Klaben provides readers with three important guidelines a person should consider when making a purchase. These guidelines are sustainability, appropriateness and sustainability. I found these to be very useful guidelines. I will consider these things the next time I want to buy something.

Klaben devotes a chapter talking about how the brain learns. I learned that 85% of my brain power is subconscious thought. Only 15% of my brain activity is conscious. Klaben explains how the subconscious works with interesting examples. Klaben also writes how people become more proficient in doing certain activities by explaining the role of myelin in the brain. I love learning new things. This entire section on the brain is simply fascinating.

Retirement yearning is another chapter in the book that I enjoyed reading. Klaben provides readers with an activity to determine whether a person is ready to retire or not. I am not close to retirement age, but I found this information to be practical and easy to understand. Klaben devotes another chapter on the concept of luck. I love his defintion of luck and the real life examples he provides.

Changing The Conversation is a book with mass appeal. Young people will be inspired by the examples that Klaben provides. Older people can reflect and use the information in the book too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A RICH BLEND OF INTERESTING SHORT STORIES, May 18, 2011
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
A rich blend of interesting short stories that put's into words the "philosophy" of money from many different points of view.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book for the financially inept, February 12, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
This is the rare type of book that, after you finish it, the author feels like a friend. I don't know Gary Klaben, but somehow, he knows what I've been unconsciously thinking and fretting about. His "Changing the Conversation" goes right to the crux of modern life: the "urgent" always crowding out the "important." He maps out ways to cut through the noise, to see things clearly, to focus on what's really important in my life, to make good long-term decisions.

Having read his book, I want to re-read it now with the improved insights he's given me. Gary Klaben has truly altered the way I think about money, my career, my family, my happiness and purpose in life. He's right: Life is about richly and fully living, not just riches. In his warm, easily understandable prose, he changes and expands "the conversation" to include my major stresses, how I can build a deep personal support system and benefit from mentors, and gain long-term well-being and joy. Starting 2011, some people may feel frustrated and in the dark about personal matters. So, read "Changing the Conversation" and quickly gain a reliable, encouraging, new friend!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Truely Transforming Conversation, November 27, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
Gary Klaben's "Changing the Conversation" -- actually a series of conversations -- is insightful in its observations, thoughtful in its message. He wants people to "mature" in their understanding of what they need to do to attain a fulfilling life. Drawing upon stories from his personal and professional experiences, Klaben concisely yet with a storyteller's flair identifies the steps to lasting personal and family success. Honest self-evaluation and emotional well-being go hand in hand, he says. Long-term financial success with multiple generations of one's family requires, first and foremost, a truly transforming conversation and mature mindset.

I found this book very relatable - Klaben leads off his chapters with interesting stories based on real-life events. He clearly has "been there" and "seen it all." He's on a mission to help stop the family wealth-destruction cycle that frequently causes families to go from "shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves" in three generations. His message is clear and crisp - in these ever-changing times, we need to focus on making wise, long-term decisions that will be in our best interest for decades (and generations) to come. Given today's complexity, we need to educate ourselves, and part of that new awareness can come from knowledgeable, trusted financial counsel backed by deep support.

Klaben's chapters on sound financial decision-making, the lifetime learning process, perseverance, and understanding one's true worth have stuck with me. Each chapter provides excellent ideas and a wise approach to living an emotionally successful life. This is an action book. I plan to "continue the conversation" with my own family and friends, to seek knowledgeable mentors, and definitely strive to "enjoy the journey."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars "A Learning Experience", November 5, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
Only very rarely does an author surprise you by flipping on bold bright lights in a room you thought unavoidably dark. When it comes to individuals and families needing long term trusted financial counsel,Gary Klaben wants a new kind of conversation: Candid, honest words that pierce to the real emotional truth of each family relationship, intent always on new insights and help, cutting through dark fog to find a true path to happiness.

I'll admit-when a friend said read "Changing the Conversation," I thought this might be just another "self-help" book. But Gary Klaben's real-life episodes that introduce his chapters-drawing on his more than 25 years as a financial and family planner-grabbed me and made me read on. His stories reveal many startling(some sad)financial mistakes people make! And-why people can't re-structure their financial lives UNLESS they also attain the emotional maturity
to reduce their complexity and live rational, happier lives.

Gary Klaben is a gifted storyteller. I intend to read this book again, maybe again & again. I want my kids and grandkids to read this book, too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A GREAT FINANCIAL GUIDE BOOK, November 4, 2010
By 
Melissa (Long Island NY) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being (Hardcover)
When I started to read the book, I though it was like any other financial book that told us what to do with our money. Changing the conversation was very different and used real-life examples and essays to explain what we need to do to help ourselves financially. It was well written and very easy to read. He describes the problems that we are facing daily and how we got into that situation. He stresses the family and how young children should taught how to manage money. I have learned in life that you should take care of yourself before worrying about money. Some of you may not agree with me but if you do not have spiritual and physical well being, what good is money anyway. This is a great book and a must read for everyone. Maybe it will help you solve some of your financial problems.(Reviewed by Eileen, Melissa's Mom)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xd85c8e2c)

This product

Changing the Conversation: Transformational Steps to Financial and Family Well-Being
$24.95 $19.38
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.