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Changing Paperback – December 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 139 pages
  • Publisher: Fairy Tale Review Press (December 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979995426
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979995422
  • Product Dimensions: 4.8 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,884 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Lily Hoang's first book, PARABOLA, won the Chiasmus Press Un-Doing the Novel Contest. She is also the author of the novel CHANGING (Fairy Tale Review Press, 2008) and the forthcoming novel THE EVOLUTIONARY REVOLUTION (Les Figues Press, 2010). She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of English & Women's Studies at Saint Mary's College in Indiana.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jesse Loren on March 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
My 13 year old's review:

Changing by Lily Hoang consists of 139 pages. Changing is made in a hexagram form, meaning blocks of separate stories in blocks instead of paragraphs. In Changing, there are no complete sentences and instead of regular `and' they are `&'s. Changing is a fairy tale of Jack and Jill and its depth, and translation of Water over Fire, a fortune, and a biography all in one. The main character is Little Girl who tells you her story of how she got to where she is and she is the narrator calling you lover and letting you into her life and all of its ups and downs and family. A full background of Jack and Jill's tale and a translation of the four elements accompany Little Girl's story. The narrator gives you complete sadness and gives you a wake up call of self-realization.

Character Analysis:

The main Character is Little Girl and her family. Her family consists of brother Big Brother, sister Big Sister, Mother, Father, and the reader who is called Lover. Little Girl describes an ex-boyfriend and he is Adam but that is only a fake name. Little Girl's primary trait is hope. Like, hope for love, hope for a better life, and hope for her family to be normal. Little Girl's actions make the work itself very melancholy. Little Girl gets molested, made fun of because she is Asian, constantly being wounded, and has many family problems. Her decisions make more conflict even form the simplest of tasks she endures. Little Girl grows and finds her dream home at the end of the story. Little Girl also realizes she is even smarter than she thought in the beginning of her life story.

Theme:

The theme of this story is to explore life to its fullest.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Sanford Smith on February 22, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lily Hoang has created something truly unique and altogether fantastic (in nearly every sense of the word) with this book.

I find this a hard book to really talk about. It's perhaps best described as a book of oscillations, in craft and syntax as well as meaning and direction. It's a book that circles in on itself as well as outward, swelling upward like an explosion while sinking into the depths like a whirlpool. Deafening in its unsuspecting force, but also at times in its silence.

This is a book that raises big questions (Are we to believe in fate? If so how seriously do we (should we) take it?)) while keeping itself grounded with an authentic, enjoyable poignancy and honesty that is generated in part from autobiographical themes that seem to course through a lot of Lily's work. It's an experiemental endeavor while at the same time struggling with its roots as a retelling of ancient fortunes.

Most importantly, it's a delicate yet strong book; beautiful and ugly but always enjoyable. I can't imagine anyone regretting the buying of this book, particularly if they give it the involvement it desires and warrants.
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By Tasia on March 26, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Changing by Lily Hoang brings the reader not only a story but also an experience. You must read from the bottom up, and the narrator will reprimand you for not doing so-- unless you are. In which case, the narrator apologizes. These little moments of interaction are what made this novel so wonderfully strange for me, along with its writing style and form. If you feel the need to break away from the traditional, this is for you.
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5 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Exordia N. on July 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
Experimental writing lacks something....

It was until page 116 that I read the hexagramque narrative from the bottom to the top as suggested repetitively by Vietnamese-American author, storyteller, narrator, fortuneteller Lily Hoang. The experimental text, a narrative woven with : sorrow, broken; parental pressures to succeed, broken; guilt, broken; and pride and pain; broken, was wrapped inside of the infrastructure of the I Ching. Like a bundle of sixty-four broken sticks folded inside of a palimpsest.

Contrary to popular beliefs, rhetorical devices used in this narrative such as run-on or repetition do not bother me. In fact, Hoang's style is beautiful because it rehashes the ancient form, but the content is agonizing. It lacks the flower, the flame, the banality of a heart bifurcated and haunted by two worlds, two cultures, two lives. It lacks what Nathan says of true polyglots possessing no country, no land, no home. But the text is what it is.
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