Channel Zero and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$6.25
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-Library. Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. EX-LIBRARY - has usual library wear/markings/attachments.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Channel Zero Paperback – February 1, 1999


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.00 $2.26
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Creative Arts Book Company (February 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887392040
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887392047
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,136,889 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Set in Oklahoma City, this wan debut tries hard but fails to make readers understand or care about its dreary characters. Charlie Rivers spends most of his time drinking beer at Lucky's and working on cars with his childhood friend Tony Marducci, a violent racist. Charlie befriends Adam, a local five-year-old whose dad worries that Charlie is a bum or pervert. Meanwhile, Charlie wants kids of his own, but his peevish wife, Linda, a Korean-African American, doesn't. When Linda impulsively sleeps with young William, a cliche-spouting "artist" she meets at Lucky's, events head toward an anticlimax and a messy end. After Linda learns she is pregnant, she finds comfort from the novel's most interesting character, a nameless one-armed waitress at Lucky's. As with the main players, however, her possibilities remain unexplored. Despite some appealingly bleak dialogue and compellingly reductive situations, the narrative narrows down to a set of featureless souls lost in an equally empty landscape.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

G. H. Thomason was born in Lawton, Oklahoma. He graduated from Cameron University with degrees in English and creative writing. In his spare time, he practices Northern Shaolin kung fu, San Da kickboxing, MMA, jiujitsu, and Vinyasa yoga.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Karen S. on December 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
Linda and Charlie Rivers deal with life as most 20-30 somethings do: having a good time, working hard, and spending time with friends. I can see a bit of myself and people that I know in this book. It is not a book with a mission to save the world-but to tell a story about people and how they live. There are consequences to decisions we make and Linda Rivers must make a choice. The characters try to do what is right and are there for one another. I found it an enjoyable read with vivid details. G.H. Thomason has a way of describing people that makes one beleive they know the characters This is an enjoyable read. Would be great for college students or gen Xer's.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book was a good debut by it's author G.H. Thomason. Only in his mid-twenties, he writes with a style somewhat similar to Barbara Kingsolver (The Bean Trees). Unfortunately his characters aren't on a journey, they are simply existing in their lives. He draws us into the lives of Charlie and Linda Rivers and their friends and neighbors. From double shifts at the restaurant to beers at Lucky's, we see it all.
I look forward to Thomason's next book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By terry salmon on January 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
GH Thomason presents us with a depiction of everyday life in lower-class America. The characters are both mundane in their existance and extraordinary in their feelings. This book is a must for twenty-somethings in modern America!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images