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Chanur's Homecoming Mass Market Paperback – March 5, 1991


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Product Details

  • Series: Chanur (Book 4)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: DAW Books (March 5, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0886771773
  • ISBN-13: 978-0886771775
  • Product Dimensions: 4.3 x 1.1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #485,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A member of the peaceful, clannish, matriarchal hani race, merchant-ship captain Pyanfar Chanur would rather be left alone to earn her living. Circumstances, however, have drawn her into a vast, complicated power struggle, as the uneasy relations among several spacegoing species are enflamed by the arrival of the first humans. Armed skirmishes are rare, but hostage-taking, torture and betrayal become standard. In this amalgam of strains from current international politics (the Mideast particularly), each race harbors several factions fighting to enact their own agendas and willing to deal with their ostensible enemies to come out on top. Thus, the ambitious kif Sikkukut releases his hostages to Chanur only after she agrees to help him seize Meetpoint station. As in the previous three titles in Cherryh's series, the interesting premise of action played out against a background of volatile culture clashes devolves into a drawn-out string of inconclusive conflicts. Paperback rights to DAW.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Furiously paced action...intricate, interesting, precarious alien politics. -- Publishers Weekly

This book and the rest of the Chanur series...comprise one of the best science fiction tales ever. Don't miss it. -- Minneapolis Star and Tribune

More About the Author

I've written sf and fantasy for publication since 1975...but I've written a lot longer than that. I have a background in Mediterranean archaeology, Latin, Greek, that sort of thing; my hobbies are travel, photography, planetary geology, physics, pond-building for koi...I run a marine tank, can plumb most anything, and I figure-skate.

I believe in the future: I'm an optimist for good reason---I've studied a lot of history, in which, yes, there is climate change, and our species has been through it. We've never faced it fully armed with what we now know, and if we play our cards right, we'll use it as a technological springboard and carry on in very interesting ways.

I also believe a writer owes a reader a book that has more than general despair to spread about: I write about clever, determined people who don't put up with situations, not for long, anyway: people who find solutions inspire me.

My personal websites and blog: http://www.cherryh.com
http://www.cherryh.com/WaveWithoutAShore
http://www.closed-circle.net

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 16 customer reviews
The pitch actually increases fairly smoothly throughout the book.
David A. Lessnau
I know the author is better known for her other books, but the Chanur books are one of the best science fiction series I have ever read.
Kenneth D. Johns
I consider books 2 through five to be in the top twenty books I have had the pleasure of reading!
Golum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David A. Lessnau on September 20, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the fourth book in the (currently) five book Chanur series. It's also the end of the trilogy that's left incomplete in the supposed "omnibus edition" "The Chanur Saga." As usual for Cherryh, this is an excellently written book that reaches down into your gut and shakes you around. As I'm re-reading these books in quick order, I found this book to be a better read than the previous two in the trilogy. Essentially, it's written at a more sustainable emotional pitch. The first two books in the trilogy just never let up. From the minute you pick them up to the minute they (don't) end, everything goes wrong and everyone's either evil, an enemy, or a fool (or some combination of the three). This book gives you a bit of a break. There are actually other people in it besides the protagonists who are good, competent, and/or an ally. The pacing is also more reasonable. You're not on the edge of your seat on every page. The pitch actually increases fairly smoothly throughout the book. An excellent end to the middle trilogy of the Chanur series.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Melissa J. Vivigatz on September 20, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Simply excellent!
The fourth book in the Chanur saga wrapped up the preceding trilogy wonderfully. An excellent read, the book keeps the reader in a state of high stress and energy throughout as the space-fairing, wounded and physically exhausted leonine crew of `The Pride of Chanur' struggle desperately to save themselves, their species, and all space-traveling races from war on a scope one recently tortured and terrified character describes as: "New kind thing. Not with rule. ... This new kind word. ... War, Pyanfar, all devils in hell got no word this thing I see."
This is not a stand-alone book. To receive the full impact you have to read the series in order. There are politics involves, species defined words and concepts; the technologies behind starship travels, warped time and the fragile Compact that holds all together.
Even beyond the storyline I think the best thing about the Chanur saga and other of C. J. Cherryh's novels is the underlining theme that just because something/someone thinks and reasons other than yourself and your ways, that does not make them evil or wrong.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael Battaglia on December 4, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Of course, saying that this is the best out of the entire series really means nothing to you because this isn't a series where you can just pick and choose which books you want to read. If you don't read the two books before it (actually three, if you want to get picky, although the prelude novel is basically standalone) you are not going to have a clue about anything that's going on here. Sure, astute readers will pick it up as they go along, but it won't have the same impact without having experienced the prior novels and the events in them. But, to recap: everything is falling apart. Pyanfar and her crew are running for their lives, alliances are being formed and broken and reformed all over the place, pitting species against species, the Compact is close to breaking and above it all rests the spectre of human beings, who might appear at any moment and totally disrupt all the balances. Cherryh must have intended the three novels to stand as one because there really is no break between them, especially in the first time. The last page of one leads you right into the first page of another, but with the first two books it's breakneck and breathless. Here, at least, we finally take a moment to get a breather and get a look at what's going on. For some reason, there's a greater emotional heft in this novel, I found myself connecting to events a little better, whether that was because I was familiar enough with the characters to actually care or because things had slowed down enough that I had a chance to care. Sometimes when the action was so dense you tended to get caught up in it and forget that these were real characters you were dealing with.Read more ›
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Murphy on October 24, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Chanur series is made up of 5 books. A prologue novel ("The Pride of Chanur"), a 3-part series ("Chanur's Venture", "The Kif Strike Back" and "Chanur's Homecoming"), and an epilogue novel ("Chanur's Legacy").
The first 3 books are collected in "The Chanur Saga" omnibus volume -- an odd collection since the concluding volume of the central trilogy is HERE, and not in the badly selected "Saga".
Note that this book does NOT stand on it's own. You need to start with "The Chanur Saga"
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 10, 1996
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I almost always rate Cherryh's books high, but this one's
definitely one of her best. The Chanur series as a whole is
so much fun that I've read every book in it half-a-dozen
times at least. Cherryh's hani are one of the most inspired
species ever created in the science fiction genre; creative,
smart, short-tempered and tough, they're always at the
center of a great story. Cherryh in general excels at this
sort of anthropological science fiction; any of the Chanur
books are definitely worth reading.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 23, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is the fourth volume of the Chanur saga and an impressive conclusion it is, too. Again, you cannot -- repeat CANNOT -- read the four volumes out of order. It's not just a series of stories set in the same universe, it's a single huge novel sliced into four chunks for the publisher's convenience. This one opens immediately following the pause at the end of _The Kif Strike Back_, with Pyanfar Chanur and her Hani crew having been coopted by one side in the struggle between two kiffish factions, which also has swept up the Mahendo-sat (who, in their traditional and methodical way, are supporting both sides) and the newly-discovered humans (who appear to control a volume of space vaster than the entire Compact in which the Hani, the Kif, the Mahendo-sat, the Stsho (extremely wealthy but extremely xenophobic and physiologically incapable of violence), and a couple of usually incomprehensible methane-breathing species co-exist more or less successfully. Only now it appears the entire Hani home world may be devastated in a war that the "groundling" majority of Hani couldn't begun to understand. The half-dozen members of the crew (all of them cousins) come across very much as individuals, as do the other non-human characters. There are no stereotyped BEMs here. In fact, since you're seeing everything through Pyanfar's eyes, the least-clear character is that of Tully, the adopted derelict human, simply because he's extremely alien to all the others and his psychology and motivations are never really clear. Cherryh does a remarkable job with the complex plot, the almost archaeological detail in the back-story, the multidimensional characters, and the themes of progress and change.
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