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  • Chaplin Mutual Comedies - Restored Edition
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Chaplin Mutual Comedies - Restored Edition


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Editorial Reviews

Twelve films directed and written by Charlie Chaplin, with new orchestral scores composed and conducted by Carl Davis! Restored from premier quality original 35mm film! This edition of THE CHAPLIN MUTUAL COMEDIES has been restored from the finest surviving 35mm film elements, with additions and improvements from new film materials which have recently surfaced.

Special Features

  • All 12 shorts restored from original 35mm prints restored by David Shepard
  • Original scores composed and conducted by Carl Davis
  • Richard Patterson's 1975 documentary The Gentleman Tramp
  • Kevin Macdonald's 1996 documentary Chaplin’s Goliath
  • Still gallery
  • Two booklets with essays by Jeffrey Vance and Richard Patterson

Product Details

  • Actors: Charles Chaplin
  • Directors: Charlie Chaplin
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Dolby, Full Screen, NTSC, Restored
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 4
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: IMAGE ENTERTAINMENT
  • DVD Release Date: July 11, 2006
  • Run Time: 301 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000F4TMIW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,272 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
83%
4 star
13%
3 star
0%
2 star
4%
1 star
0%
See all 23 customer reviews
The big plus is a total of 7 minutes of new material added through out the short!
Paul J. Mular
Chaplin raised the art of silent film making to it's pinnacle in his day and can still be richly enjoyed in ours.
Dean Dreher
While Chaplin dvds can come from various places, the usual good dvds are out of print and very expensive.
A. Pierre

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

86 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Paul J. Mular TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 24, 2006
Verified Purchase
***2014 update***
Get the new Flicker Alley Blu-ray that David Shepard put out! Chaplin's Mutual Comedies. David has out-done himself on ONE AM! Now we have a razor sharp image in addition to the restored 7 minutes. You would think it was filmed yesterday!

-----original review 2006--------
David Shepard gave a sneak preview of these new DVDs at the Niles-Essanay Film Museum's Edison Theater on June 23,2006. I must say that while the last DVD restoration was great, this one keeps that same excellent film transfer, but adds more missing footage & title/dialogue cards from newly discovered prints.

ONE AM has the biggest improvement with a total of over 7 minutes of additional footage, I was not able to do a side-by-side comparison but there were scenes I did not remember. I do not want to spoil the comedy surprises of new footage here, you will have to enjoy it yourself.

Other shorts such as THE RINK included new comedy bits and title / dialogue cards that helped the flow & understanding of the story.

The bottom line is that this restoration does not improve on the already sharper picture quality of the previous release, but it does add missing footage not seen in the U.S. since the films' original releases.

***UPDATE 7/20:***
I have now had a chance to do a syncronized side-by-side comparison. While all of the other shorts are restored as mentioned above, adding new footage to the existing transfer, ONE AM is a totally new transfer.

My reaction to this new transfer is mixed. The big plus is a total of 7 minutes of new material added through out the short!
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Snorre Smari Mathiesen on December 10, 2006
If there's any truth to the proverb that the biggest enemy to great is good, this presentation of Chaplin's Mutual-films is not without an enemy. Granted, these twelve short films, made in 1916-17 to fulfill a contract which made the comedian into the highest-paid entertainer of his day, have been available in at least reasonably good prints through the years. This can be attributed to their lasting popularity, which assured that recent reissues of the films were still in circulation well into the era of TV. With this in mind, Chaplin's earlier films at Keystone and Essanay may appear to have been in more desperate need of restoration, as the public demand for these earlier, somewhat cruder films ceased as the years went by, causing the shape of surviving prints to deteriorate. However, while I fully support the ambition to have both the Keystones and Essanays restored as best as possible, a strong case can be made that it was during his period at Mutual that Chaplin turned out his first masterpieces, and to have these films available in "at least reasonably good prints" is simply not satisfying in the long run. This set, RESTORED 90TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION, does not only assure that the entertainment value of the films is kept intact; it actually takes Chaplin's artistic evolution seriously, making viewers able to study every nuance and detail through crisp, crystal-clear presentations. All in all, Image Entertainment has produced the most visually satisfying versions of the Mutual-films, ever.

As is to be expected, David Shepard, among others, has been involved in the restoration, using the best sources available. In some cases, most notably in ONE A.M. and THE RINK, the restorations even provide recently discovered footage, apparently not seen since their original releases.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robert G. Martinez on August 21, 2007
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It has been 90 years since these great comedies were made (1916-17) and many folks that are new to Chaplin may dismiss them as funny shorts. Chaplin by 1916 was a real big star and was paid $650,000 to do these 12 comedies in a little over a year. A ridiculous sum in 1916. Unlike his full feature films from the 20's and 30's (with the exception of City Lights - a masterpiece)) where there was much emphasis on pathos,and tearjerking scenes, these comedies are wild and wacky. In 1970, I bought some of these on 8mm films thru Blackhawk Films and the quality was OK, but these prints are a revelation. The Mutual Comedies are the height of Chaplin's art. Each film features a theme: The Pawnbroker, The Rink, The Vagabond, Easy Street etc. and they are all hilarious. The Mutuals had a cast of stock actors that too were outstanding including his 300-pound bully Eric Campbell, Edna Purveyance, his love interest, Albert Austin, Henry Bergman and others. THIS IS THE FINEST QUALITY EVER SEEN ON THESE MOVIES! There are Documentaries galore which are also very interesting. Without dialogue, Chaplin could make you laugh just with his eyes or an expression, or his walk. People forget that he revolutionized motion pictures by bringing movies even to the smallest of towns. People all over the world loved Chaplin. This is a milestone in cinema history and every serious student of film should own this and watch a master at work.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Scott T. Rivers VINE VOICE on July 9, 2008
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When Charlie Chaplin signed with the Mutual Film Company in 1916, he became the highest-paid performer at that time (with an annual salary of $670,000) and produced a dozen two-reelers that served as a blueprint for the rest of his career. The Mutuals captured the essence of Chaplin's serio-comic brilliance while revealing an artist at his creative peak. A stronger sense of ensemble was evident in the menacing presence of Eric Campbell, who became regarded as the ideal Chaplin heavy. "Easy Street" and "The Immigrant" (both 1917) represent the comedian's first masterpieces - incorporating social criticism that foreshadowed his feature-length efforts. The rough-edged quality of the Keystone and Essanay shorts has been replaced by a more polished style, with "The Rink" (1916) and "The Cure" (1917) displaying remarkable physical virtuosity. Charlie's later films never matched the exuberance and self-assuredness of that glorious 16-month period when the Little Tramp reached his artistic maturity.
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