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Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery Hardcover – May 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Grub Street Cookery; New edition (May 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1902304888
  • ISBN-13: 978-1902304885
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #235,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Jane Grigson left to the English-speaking world a legacy of fine writing on food and cookery for which no exact parallel exists..." Alan Davidson "Jane Grigson likes to conjure. She is marvellous at putting food into a culture-context..." The Times

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Customer Reviews

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It is a text about French Pig Cookery and here, Jane Grigson does an excellent job.
jack of all trades
It is much closer to a technical book on how to make and cook with forcemeats and cured pork products than a source for the home cook.
B. Marold
If you are a proffesional, hobbyist or experienced home/farm cook then this book is a must.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

135 of 138 people found the following review helpful By J. V. Lewis VINE VOICE on June 14, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am on an unholy mission to convert a few Amazonians to the pleasures of do-it-yourself charcuterie. My travels in search of gustatory ecstacy have revealed many a depressing deficiency in American food, one of the most egregious of which is the state of this country's meats. Besides the much-publicized and lamented feed-lot economy that guarantees cheap and flavorless meat for all, we have forfeited the rich, varied, and highly-localized meat traditions of Europe. We have replaced flavor, texture, and local nuance with industrial products that satisfy the huge distributors but leave our tongues and bellies beggared. I am writing a series of reviews that laud a few recent books that do a great job in trying to rectify this impoverishment.

Perhaps the most thorough and comprehensive of the bunch is Jane Grigson's. Over almost 350 dense, detailed pages she covers the hows and whys of charcuterie. Everything from tools and methods to the meat itself is presented in lucid prose, with a fine eye to determining what, exactly, the reader needs to know to make good meat products at home. Sausages of every kind and description, pates, terrines, puddings, saltings, fresh pork preparations, sauces, gallantines... the scope of this book approaches the scope of knowledge a Franch charcutier might possess. Few details escaped Grigson's attention, for her purpose was no humbler than to revive charcuterie in Britain. If she accomplished nothing more than to inspire Fergus Henderson to become the greatest meat-man of his generation, she should rest in peace.

The book has many virtues, readability and enthusiasm not least among them. But its real gift is its comprehensiveness and its almost unique ability to guide the reader through unfamiliar territory.
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69 of 73 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on March 20, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
`Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery' is the prominent 20th century English culinary writer, Jane Grigson's first book, first published in 1967. Like her last book, `English Food' and unlike many of her intermediate books, this is a very scholarly book that may not have much appeal to the average amateur cook. It is much closer to a technical book on how to make and cook with forcemeats and cured pork products than a source for the home cook. As I will discuss later, that doesn't mean it has no value for the amateur cook, especially those for whom cooking has become a hobby or avocation.

Grigson is one of the most prominent disciples of the great English culinary writer, Elizabeth David, who, through Grigson, Alan Davidson, Jill Norman, Claudia Roden and American, Richard Olney has influenced a large share of a generation of English language culinary writers and restaurateurs. David is a palpable presence throughout this book with references to her works and her London cookware shop sprinkled liberally throughout the text. In a sense, this book is an extension to David's own `French Provincial Cooking', as Grigson picks up on one of the most important specialities of French home and commercial cooking.

I sense an increased interest in `charcuterie' throughout the American culinary reading public. Of course, the Food Network has not yet come out with a show on `charcuterie' but I have seen on DVD an episode on sausage making done by Julia Child and at least two of Alton Brown's `Good Eats' shows have been dedicated to these subjects. The most convincing evidence is the publication of the recent book, `Charcuterie' by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Poleyn and certainly the easily satirized Emeril Lagasse exclamation that `pork fat rules'.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By jack of all trades on December 30, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is not really a text on Charcuterie as the term has come to be used recently in America. It is a text about French Pig Cookery and here, Jane Grigson does an excellent job. To repeat, if you are looking for a text about making fresh sausages or salamis, look elsewhere (use "a pinch of Saltpeter" indeed)....

However if you are looking for a book to learn how to make Pates, Galantines, Rillettes, etc. or a text on how to use feet, head, tripe, etc. you have found a great text. Sausages made entirely of tripe, who'd of thunk it? 10 different ways to prepare the head....Great stuff.

This text will not work for you if you don't already know how to cook. Most of the recipes are a bit "loosey goosey" when it comes to precise measurements of ingredients and heat and cooking time...that said, most of these recipes will also work well within in wide parameters.

Summary: If you want to learn ways to cook a pig that you've never thought of...or seen outside of Europe...this is a great book. If you want some sort of "Charcuterie de jur" text...it will not.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jules Carney on October 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Next to getting to work with your French Uncle at the local charcuterie shop; Jane's book brings you an unabridged look at the craft with an unapologetic eye. Although the book was originally written in the late 60's (1967), and some of the discussion reflects this time period, don't be fooled, it is timeless; the recipes classic and the instruction still clearly relevant. Jane has made this an interesting read, and a doable set of recipes for most cooks. It is a must have for anyone who wants to move beyond just exploring Charcuterie.
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