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Chariots of Fire (Two-Disc Special Edition)

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Chariots of Fire: Special Edition (Dbl DVD) (O-Sleeve)

Winner of four Academy Awards(R) including Best Picture! The inspiring true story of British athletes competing in the 1924 Olympics. Ben Cross and Ian Charleson head a sterling cast of newcomers and veterans. The story, told in flashback, of two young British sprinters competing for fame in the 1924 Olympics. Eric, a devout Scottish missionary runs because he knows it must please God. Harold, the son of a newly rich Jew runs to prove his place in Cambridge society.

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Additional Features

It took 24 years for the 1981 Best Picture Oscar winner to receive a widescreen home video version. Although this is far better looking and sounding than previous versions (especially TV airings and the ho-hum original DVD), the print isn't as flawless one would hope. A second disc includes two documentaries with new interviews from many members of the cast and crew. In 25 minutes, a good deal of the passion behind the project--created by many first-time film talents--is communicated along with pictures of the real-life figures. Director Hugh Hudson gives more insight with an ordinary commentary pointing out where dramatic license works (Liddell's Olympic plight) and keeping silent when it doesn't (the run around the college campus). A 19-minute reunion with two supporting actors plus the director, writer, and cinematographer drop by producer David Putnam's house to reminisce about the making of the film; it's a lot more interesting than it sounds. Eleven minutes of deleted scenes are nice snippets of character development and a cricket scene that was in all cuts of the film except the American version. It's a real curio since it was the original introduction of the athletes and could have been integrated in this DVD. --Doug Thomas

Special Features

Additional Scenes: Cricket in the Ballroom Two Masters and Abrahams Tea Dance Nationalism Eric and Jennie Liddell Argue Harold Abrahams Running Past Car Harold Abrahams and Sam Mussabini Speak of Speeding up the Pace Audio Commentary: by Director Hugh Hudson Easter Eggs: #1: Director Hugh Hudson, Producer Lord Puttnam and Actor Nigel Phelps relive the famous sprint around the quad. #2 Ben Cross talks about running for the famous open shot. Featurette: Wings on their Heels: The Making of Chariots of Fire Chariots of Fire: A Reunion Other: Screen tests for Ben Cross and Ian CharlesonAdditional Scenes: Cricket in the Ballroom Two Masters and Abrahams Tea Dance Nationalism Eric and Jennie Liddell Argue Harold Abrahams Running Past Car Harold Abrahams and Sam Mussabini Speak of Speeding up the Pace Audio Commentary: by Director Hugh Hudson Easter Eggs: #1: Director Hugh Hudson, Producer Lord Puttnam and Actor Nigel Phelps relive the famous sprint around the quad. #2 Ben Cross talks about running for the famous open shot. Featurette: Wings on their Heels: The Making of Chariots of Fire Chariots of Fire: A Reunion Other: Screen tests for Ben Cross and Ian CharlesonAdditional Scenes: Cricket in the Ballroom Two Masters and Abrahams Tea Dance Nationalism Eric and Jennie Liddell Argue Harold Abrahams Running Past Car Harold Abrahams and Sam Mussabini Speak of Speeding up the Pace Audio Commentary: by Director Hugh Hudson Easter Eggs: #1: Director Hugh Hudson, Producer Lord Puttnam and Actor Nigel Phelps relive the famous sprint around the quad. #2 Ben Cross talks about running for the famous open shot. Featurette: Wings on their Heels: The Making of Chariots of Fire Chariots of Fire: A Reunion Other: Screen tests for Ben Cross and Ian CharlesonAdditional Scenes: Cricket in the Ballroom Two Masters and Abrahams Tea Dance Nationalism Eric and Jennie Liddell Argue Harold Abrahams Running Past Car Harold Abrahams and Sam Mussabini Speak of Speeding up the Pace Audio Commentary: by Director Hugh Hudson Easter Eggs: #1: Director Hugh Hudson, Producer Lord Puttnam and Actor Nigel Phelps relive the famous sprint around the quad. #2 Ben Cross talks about running for the famous open shot. Featurette: Wings on their Heels: The Making of Chariots of Fire Chariots of Fire: A Reunion Other: Screen tests for Ben Cross and Ian CharlesonAdditional Scenes: Cricket in the Ballroom Two Masters and Abrahams Tea Dance Nationalism Eric and Jennie Liddell Argue Harold Abrahams Running Past Car Harold Abrahams and Sam Mussabini Speak of Speeding up the Pace Audio Commentary: by Director Hugh Hudson Easter Eggs: #1: Director Hugh Hudson, Producer Lord Puttnam and Actor Nigel Phelps relive the famous sprint around the quad. #2 Ben Cross talks about running for the famous open shot. Featurette: Wings on their Heels: The Making of Chariots of Fire Chariots of Fire: A Reunion Other: Screen tests for Ben Cross and Ian CharlesonAdditional Scenes: Cricket in the Ballroom Two Masters and Abrahams Tea Dance Nationalism Eric and Jennie Liddell Argue Harold Abrahams Running Past Car Harold Abrahams and Sam Mussabini Speak of Speeding up the Pace Audio Commentary: by Director Hugh Hudson Easter Eggs: #1: Director Hugh Hudson, Producer Lord Puttnam and Actor Nigel Phelps relive the famous sprint around the quad. #2 Ben Cross talks about running for the famous open shot. Featurette: Wings on their Heels: The Making of Chariots of Fire Chariots of Fire: A Reunion Other: Screen tests for Ben Cross and Ian Charleson

Product Details

  • Actors: Nicholas Farrell, Nigel Havers, Ian Charleson, Ben Cross, Daniel Gerroll
  • Directors: Hugh Hudson
  • Writers: Colin Welland
  • Producers: Dodi Fayed, David Puttnam
  • Format: AC-3, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Original recording remastered, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen, Surround Sound
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: February 1, 2005
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (639 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0006HBLUA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #39,276 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Chariots of Fire (Two-Disc Special Edition)" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

284 of 295 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 3, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This is a beautiful film, well directed by Hugh Hudson in his theatrical film debut. It features the true life story of two Olympic runners, Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson) and Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross), who ran for Great Britain in the 1924 Olympic Games and brought home the Gold.

The film tells the story of these two individuals, who are as different from each other as different can be, and explores their personal drive and reasons for running. Eric Liddell is a staunch Scot and a fervid Presbyterian (He would put John Knox to shame!). The son of a missionary and himself a missionary by avocation, he runs because "God made him fast for a reason". His running is a reconciliation of his faith and his passion, which is running. He runs for the glory of God. His faith always remains constant and pre-eminent in his life. His devotion to it causes some controversy during the Olympics, as a consequence of the stance he takes when he discovers that the preliminary mete for the 200 metre race would be held on a Sunday. Liddell simply refuses to run on the Sabbath! Luckily for Great Britain, Lord Andrew Lindsay (Nigel Havers), a gentleman and fellow competitor, graciously steps in and, as he had already won a gold medal in the hurdles, gives him his place in the 400 metre dash, which would take place on a Thursday. This would never happen today in the dog eat dog world of competitive sports, much less in the Olympics of today!

Harold Abrahams is completely different. A secular Jew and Cambridge scholar, he studies in the bastion of upper crust British society, struggling to fit in but always remaining the proverbial outsider. He has a passion for running that is motivated by his passion for winning. In his world, God has nothing to do with it.
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77 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Chapin on July 20, 2005
Format: DVD
Chariots of Fire, no matter what I view in the future, will always be in my Top 10 list of movies. The setting, the actors, and the plot are incomparable. However, what I treasure the most are the values intrinsic to the tale. How often does film concern infidelity, murder, hatred, deceit or the pathological need to dominate others? Well over 80 percent of the time I would guess, but here, in this masterwork, man is depicted at his finest. In Harold Abrahams and Eric Liddell, we are presented with exemplars of our species. These are the adults you dreamed of being when you were a small child. Their lives showcase a grandeur seldom seen in our own.

The film is set in the years immediately following the first world war, when feelings of grief and despair were ubiquitous. Upon their arrival at Cambridge, Abrahams and Montague are assisted by two former wounded soldiers, and one of them could best be described as "mutilated." Such a fate, the two young athletes were quite lucky not to have shared.

Societies that experienced the caldrons of the Somme and Paschendale were not as quick to dismiss the existence of God as we are today with our spoiled affluence and inflated life expectancies. To be saved from the carnage raging around you is not something to take lightly. Given the solemnity of their era, the seriousness and devotion integral to Liddell and Abrahams is not surprising. Competition was undertaken for more important reasons than money or fame.

Eric Liddell eventually concludes that missionary work in China will have to wait until he fulfills his athletic promise. He believes that God did not give out gifts without a purpose. The Lord's intention was that what Liddell was given must be used.
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107 of 115 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Hamlow HALL OF FAME on July 7, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
The athletes of the British running team who went with hope in their hearts and wings in their heels in the VIII Olympiad in Paris in 1924 is the focus of this movie, but there's also the dynamics of what it means to be English, and the reconciliation of one's soul and religious convictions in the Modern Age. Three of them are students from Cambridge. There is the quiet and soft-spoken Aubrey Montague, Lord Andrew Lindsey, and Harold Abrahams. As the head of Caius (pronounced Keys) College tells them when they first attend in 1919, they are the first post-war generation who have inherited the dreams of a generation that perished on the fields of France, a generation embodying "goodness, zeal,...and intellectual promise."
The two main athletes here are a contrast from one another. One is Harold Abrahams, a Jew who wants to be seen as English as the fellow next to him. Hence his enrolling in all these clubs and fraternities in Caius College, from track, tennis, and even the Gilbert and Sullivan glee club-he wants to enter the Christian, Anglo-Saxon corridors of power, i.e. the old school tie. He succeeds in getting to an English girl in the form of Sybil Gordon, who doesn't mind he's Jewish. He can run like the wind, and nothing would fulfill his dream of being English more than winning so he'll be accepted, but he's so driven, hinging so much of his success on his winning, that he acts like its his own funeral when he loses in a race. He engages Sam Mussabini, a private and professional coach, which is contrary to the implied rules of Cambridge.
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Chariots of Fire Blu-ray? When available?
2oth Century Fox is releasing it on October 5 in France, so we should see a US release around that time.
Jul 5, 2011 by Steven Aldersley |  See all 3 posts
Will this work on a blu ray player in the US? Be the first to reply
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