Qty:1
Charlie Rose with Arthur ... has been added to your Cart

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Charlie Rose with Arthur Miller (February 18, 2005)
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Charlie Rose with Arthur Miller (February 18, 2005)


Price: $24.95 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
1 used from $21.96
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$24.95
$24.95 $21.96
DVD-R Note: This product is manufactured on demand when ordered from Amazon.com. [Learn more]
$24.95 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

An hour-long appreciation of the great playwright Arthur Miller. He died recently at the age of 89.

This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: "Charlie Rose, Inc."
  • DVD Release Date: August 10, 2006
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000GAKU8Q
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #252,281 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
50%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
50%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Shalom Freedman HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 13, 2007
This show consists in selections from the various conversations Charlie Rose had through the years with Arthur Miller. Miller always appears as a somewhat stiff and stodgy character, though at one point Rose and him have a good laugh. He is however one of the great American playwrights and what he has to say in these interviews is truly interesting. He speaks about the poor state of the American theatre. He speaks of his greatest regret that he was not part of a repertory theatre which he would have written many more plays for. He seems to feel that the writing of more plays was something he could have and should have done. He tells Charlie Rose about his technique in writing. For him writing a play is an act of hearing .He wrote and heard the characters' voices. He when asked about what the great playwrights which Rose lists as Miller, Tennessee Williams, Eugene O'Neill, Chekhov and Shakespeare had in common Miller says I think in a very partial and small way their 'moral sense' their moral outrage. He is of course speaking for himself and projecting his own prominent quality on the others.
Rose takes Miller through various stages of his life. Miller surprises by being willing to talk about the Marilyn Monroe chapter. He says that she contained in herself 'everything'. He claims she was too dependent on her coach Lee Strasberg, that she was destroyed by drugs. He does not indicate his own personal part in this.
He speaks about other aspects of his life and work. When towards the end he seems to express great pride in his own family, the irony of this is not understandable at that time. For it is only after he dies that the whole story of the retarded child who he kept from the public eye , is told.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
The asking price for this DVD is obscene. Charlie Rose has a right to be paid for his work...we are not communists, after all. But this strikes me as egregiously exploitative and greedy. Arthur Miller was a profound voice in his literary critique of a certain aspect of American life in the middle of the last century. But that was a half a century ago, and I resent Charlie Rose, Inc. bottling up the later-life reflections of this man and making them available only at an extravagant price. It is Miller, after all, who was an important figure, not the shallow and posturing Charlie Rose. I do not at all deny that Rose -- in his best moments -- has a great interviewer's instinct for going after what is important. But he is very well paid for his work without treating a national treasure as his own property.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in