Charlotte Au Chocolat: Memories of a Restaurant Girlhood and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $15.57 (60%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Used Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Charlotte Au Chocolat: Memories of a Restaurant Girlhood Hardcover – Bargain Price, February 16, 2012


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Bargain Price
"Please retry"
$10.38
$1.78 $1.30

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
Best%20Books%20of%202014

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Hardcover (February 16, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594488150
  • ASIN: B00B9ZIQYC
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.9 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,049,410 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Charlotte au Chocolat charms.”—The New York Times Book Review
 
“Every paragraph here is a confection of wit, color, texture, and taste, all overlaid with a dusting of melancholy for a lost restaurant, a lost time, a childhood that set Charlotte Silver apart and inspired her to write this utterly captivating memoir.”—The Huffington Post
 
“Silver illustrates the details of her upbringing with luminous clarity
. . . these poignant moments are as exact as poetry.”—The Boston Globe


 
"Bright and vivacious."—USA Today

"Child of artist-restauranteurs, Silver recalls a girlhood filled with pink linens, candied violets, and constant threat of financial ruin. But it’s her ode to her quirky, dazzling mom that makes the dish."—Good Housekeeping



"Charlotte au Chocolat is simply exquisite. Savor it. Devour it. Silver has taken a cool-eyed, unsentimental look at her unique and strange childhood and made lavish, glorious art of it."—Lily King, author of Father of the Rain

"Charlotte Silver has written a love song to a remarkable restaurant and a vanished world. I devoured these pages with the same enthusiasm as the author brings to pheasant’s legs and steak tartare on toast."—Margot Livesey, author of Eva Moves the Furniture
 
"Reading Charlotte au Chocolat is like sitting down to a sumptuous, many-coursed dinner--and then, after taking your last bite of Queen Mother's cake, having the pleasure of lingering in the kitchen, where a cast of vivid characters conjures culinary magic until closing time. A feast of a book!"—Allison Hoover Bartlett, author of The Man Who Loved Books Too Much

About the Author

Charlotte Silver grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, before attending Bennington College in Vermont. She studied writing at the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and has been published in The New York Times. She lives in New York and Boston.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
7
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
What a lovely, wonderful book.
Mark Maloney
It is an easy read, and very colorfully written.
Vickie Grogan
I loved this book, Charlotte au Chocolate.
Janet Newton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Shep Farmer on February 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The writing is to be savored, though in truth I gobbled this book up in a few sittings. It's a reflective rite of passage story of a girl growing up in a world of glamour vs. reality. Actually I know very little about fancy food and high fashion, but was completely captivated through the vivid descriptions. I know a lot more about coming to terms with your parents as people - a theme that resonates with many and is explored by the author with much tenderness and care.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Benedict on February 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover
[...]
It doesn't happen often that a memoir reminds me of one of the masterpieces of the personal essay, Joan Didion's love letter to New York, the classic "Goodbye to All That." Despite its frilly cover, Charlotte Silver's Charlotte au Chocolat: Memories of a Restaurant Girlhood is a rightful heir to Didion's piece. And yes, author Silver was named after the dessert of the same name by her famous-in-Cambridge restauranteur-mother, co-owner of Upstairs on the Square né Upstairs at the Pudding, where Harvard professors, presidents, parents -- and even Julia Child -- have dined since it opened in 1982.

Upstairs at the Pudding, the exotic backdrop of Silver's memoir, was in a rickety Victorian in Harvard Square, one flight above Harvard's Hasty Pudding Club, established in 1770. Vivid in her memories of the Hasty Puding are Teddy Roosevelt's stuffed crocodile over the bar and a dusty gold plaque that reads FROM THE PUDDING TO THE PRESIDENCY, followed by the names of club members John Adams, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR, and JFK. This is no ordinary restaurant, no ordinary childhood.

Silver spent what sounds like every night there, often napping under the bar or dining alone with her signature Shirley Temple, getting to know the eccentric wait staff, and growing up, in a heavenly sort of way, long before her time. Called "the Ritz of Cambridge" by a regular customer, the restaurant was an oasis of elegance and haute cuisine in this place better known for haute Puritanism. And how lucky we are to have this elegant, wry account of life in the front room vs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Henry James on February 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a thoroughly delicious and delightful read. Silver has a sensibility that is unique and dazzling. She manages to recount her magical youth in a fantastical restaurant with a marvelous combination of delight, nostalgia, and irony. Her insights are at the same time startling and convincing. Most important, the book reminds us of the enchantments and bafflements of growing up, even if most of us didn't have the grade of chocolate that Charlotte's mother guaranteed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Janet Newton on March 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I loved this book, Charlotte au Chocolate. If you are going to be melancholy about time past and the ephemeral nature of things why not do it while eating a wonderful meal surrounded by the vestiges of the upper class college club life. If you love the front room of a restaurant and all its pretense of refinement and civility why not have a large sip from a glass of irony as you peek into the kitchen. If you are turned off by the vulgar and the sad and the harsh realities of life why not put on Deborah's violet glasses and see the beautiful, the comical. If you think things are too tough or sad why not put on a pretty dress, stand up straight and smile. You can also learn to roll up your sleeves and do what needs to be done. All this and more from a very small but big first novel. Impressive. I am going to buy this for my friends.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jill-Elizabeth (Jill Franclemont) on April 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover
My review copy of Charlotte Au Chocolat was provided courtesy of LuxuryReading.com, which also hosted the original (shorter) post of this book review on February 26, 2012.

The book tells the story of Charlotte Silver, born and raised by restaurateur parents (together and, ultimately, separately) at Upstairs at the Pudding, the restaurant above the Hasty Pudding Club in Harvard Square. Well, technically both parents turned out to be restaurateurs, although her mother found herself fulfilling that role rather unexpectedly. To say more is to give a bit of a spoiler, so let's leave it at that, shall we?

As I was saying, the book chronicles young Charlotte's life in the elite culinary world of a high-end Boston restaurant. From her earliest days, she dressed for dinner, dined on wild European boar, and was served the dessert she was named for - Charlotte au Chocolat (a confection of chocolate, ladyfingers, and liqueur that sounds to die for). Her days and nights were split between the Front of the House (i.e., the customers, the opulent dining room, and the dressed-to-the-nines service personnel) and the Back of the House (i.e., the chefs, kitchen, and cleaning staff). From a young age, she learned that never the twain shall meet - except in the person of her oh-so-glamorous mother, the chef and manager of the establishment.

A most elegant childhood, indeed.

Also, sadly, often a fairly lonely one. The restaurant busy is not an easy one. Tales of financial woes, legal battles over the building lease, and many long nights spent sitting at a table for one abound. Still, Charlotte and her mother managed to hold on to the restaurant - and their relationship - with a rather indomitable spirit and sense of self that I believe made for a thoroughly enjoyable read.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews