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Chasing Harry Winston Hardcover – January 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Printing edition (2008)
  • ISBN-10: 068405695X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684056951
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (254 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,996,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lauren Weisberger is the author of The Devil Wears Prada, which spent more than a year on the New York Times hardcover and paperback bestseller lists. The film version, starring Meryl Streep and Anne Hathaway, won a Golden Globe Award and grossed over $300 million worldwide. Her second novel, Everyone Worth Knowing, was also a New York Times bestseller. She lives in New York City with her husband.

Customer Reviews

This book was a fun summer read.
Alanna
The characters are vapid and selfish, the story line thin to non-existent, and the writing is totally disjointed.
K. McMahon
The plot was okay, but wasn't really interesting until the very end of the book.
Christina A. Self

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

101 of 106 people found the following review helpful By K. McMahon on June 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Do not waste your money, time, or effort on this piece of trash. I enjoyed Devil Wears Prada immensely and thought Everyone Worth Knowing was a decent effort as well. But this third novel by Lauren Weisberger had me groaning in agony. The characters are vapid and selfish, the story line thin to non-existent, and the writing is totally disjointed. There were points in the story where I thought I was missing pages in my books because, apparently, Weisberger and her editor forgot the meaning of the word "transition."

I also take issue with the fact that the three main female characters, who are approaching thirty, seem to be more jealous and catty than they are happy and excited when something goes well for one of them. Of course we all feel pangs of jealousy from time to time, but these young women did not one iota of emotional substance keeping them together. Nor did they have any friends besides each other. I guess that makes sense -- Who else would want to spend time with them?! I certainly wouldn't.

There is more I can say but most of it would be a repeat of what the other 1- and 2-star reviewers have already written. I am not even going to bother keeping this book around. I will donate it to a used book shop or the Salvation Army as soon as you can say "This book stinks!"
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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful By A. Shum on June 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is probably one of the worst books I've ever read. The plot, if you can call it that, went nowhere and the book just dragged on and on and on. I kept hoping it would get better but it never did. The characters were boring and so cliche. The story lacked any kind of depth or emotion and was just filled with superficial material. I've never written a review for a book, but it was so terrible I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.
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43 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Ellis Bell VINE VOICE on June 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Having read so many bad reviews, I was surprised by Chasing Harry Winston. It's actually much better than I expected it to be.

After being dumped by her boyfriend of five years, baby-obsessed Emmy (a restaurateur) decides that she'll sleep with as many random men as possible. Tired of sleeping with many men in succession, ultra-glamorous, Brazilian Adriana decides to enter into a monogamous relationship and possibly get engaged. Leigh, a book editor, is tired of her life, despite a job she loves and a (seemingly) perfect boyfriend. One evening over dinner, two of the three decide to change their lives dramatically within the space of a year.

In Chasing Harry Winston, Weisberger dumps the format she adopted for her first two novels. In some ways, this is good, and gives Weisberger the chance to branch out a bit. This is no outsider-looking-in tale told from a whiney first-person perspective. There's no hellish boss, no glamorous fashion or PR industry. The characters in this novel are surprisingly more unique than those in Weisberger's other two books; with the exception of the perfect boyfriend, I definitely found myself relating to Leigh a little bit. However, the author doesn't seem to be able to create anything new--it seems like this plot has been seen before, most notably in Candace Bushnell's Sex and the City.

The characters, disturbingly, define themselves primarily by their relationships with men; their careers and the other parts of their personal lives repeatedly take backseats to boyfriends and fiancées. Adriana, despite her "tricks" for getting men to chase her, is really the one doing the chasing. It was tough, too, for me to believe the Leigh-Russell relationship.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Just for a read on July 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Needless to say, I picked this up because I loved her book, The Devil Wears Prada." This novel in comparison is CRAP. The whole way through I kept hoping I would begin to like or relate to to care about her characters, but they always fell flat. The writing is blurry at best and cluttered with cliches. I wish I had spent my money on a better book.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Lisa on September 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is a major departure for Lauren Weisberger-- in that it is terrible to the point of nearly being unreadable. Don't get me wrong-- I don't take my chick lit too seriously. If a book has a pink cover with stilettos on it, there's a slight chance it might have reasonably good writing and character development, but usually the best you can hope for is a cheesy but fun, quick read. This book, however, crosses the threshold from silly to painful. The characters are one-dimensional, stereotypical, and derivative of every other mainstay of chick culture-- she might as well have named Adriana Samantha. Oh, and the way that she defined one of her characters as ethnic-- she made her say "querida" in every other sentence, because you know, that's how Latinas talk. And by the way, I live in NYC, and it's not too often that you stumble across world famous actors/ directors/ sportscasters/ authors who are just dying to go out with you. Or, for that matter, that you suddenly get movie deals dropped into your lap. I was also annoyed by the title, which as it turns out, applies only vaguely to only one character-- it's almost as if she chose the title because she thought it sounded good and not because it had any huge relevance to the book.

But perhaps what drove me the most crazy was how they kept waxing poetic about how old they are. The characters are all 29 year-olds who turn 30 over the course of the book, and they all act like they're turning 60. In one scene, they're out to dinner celebrating one of their 30th birthdays, and the waitress says something to the effect of "I hope I look like you when I'm your age." The characters roll their eyes, saying the waitress couldn't be older than 24, as if that were a zygote in comparison to their many years.
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