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Chauncey Hare: Protest Photographs Hardcover – October 31, 2009


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Hardcover, October 31, 2009
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 373 pages
  • Publisher: Steidl/Steven Kasher Gallery; 1 edition (October 31, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3865214959
  • ISBN-13: 978-3865214959
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 1.6 x 11.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,402,673 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robin Benson on April 21, 2010
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I get the impression from reading blogs and books about these intriguing photos that they capture a down-trodden America bought low by big business yet look through the pages and there are plenty of folk sitting in what can only be considered as comfortable middle management type homes. Having said that I was struck by the absence of pictures or other wall decorations in many of these interiors, no doubt a deliberate choice of the owners and also many of these rooms appeared to be in pre-war houses.

There are, though plenty of Hare's probing photos of workers and the elderly who clearly would fit the description of down trodden and living in straightened circumstances. The general mood of all the images is of a lingering bleakness created by Hare's photo style of avoiding any subtleties of shadow. However the look of the printed photos can be influenced by the presentation as well. The negative reception to Frank's 'The Americans' was partly due to the book looking raw with its tightly cropped photos printed in strong blacks by the gravure process.

Hare's first book 'Interior America', from 1978, had the seventy-seven photos printed with a 150 screen on average paper making them look much bleaker than they do in this book. Here they are 175 screen tritones on a matt art and it shows: everything is a bit softer and more detailed. The majority of the 170 images in the book are interiors and of those most are domestic, the others are public spaces in a variety of buildings. Eleven photos from his series 'This was corporate America' are grouped together (pages 302 to 325) as are fifteen exteriors of houses and street scenes (pages 216 to 245) with another three near the back of the book.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. A. Ross on February 27, 2010
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Chauncey Hare's "Protest Photographs" is one of the most powerful photobooks ever published. Hare is a compassionate radical with the rare ability to actually see deeply into American life. His photographs capture, without irony or pose, the empty spaces inside American homes, the alienation hovering within the wokplace, the saddness that permeates the lives of the working class.
Including much of his masterpiece "Interior America" and many pictures never before shared, this photobook reminds us how a photographer can make work with the intention of changing the world he pictures. This compellingly beautiful book ranks among the greatest photobooks ever published. It is simple a treasure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AL on September 23, 2010
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Having only read about Chauncey Hare in Gerry Badger's and Martin Parr's 'The Photobook: A History Vol 2' I was interested to see his work as his original book 'Interior America' is a rarity. The Badger/Parr description wasn't fully complementary but their description of Hare's completely open discussion of his own shortcomings was signficant. 'Protest Photos' is a well-printed book and contains a full overview of Hare's large collection, using a standard lay out. Fortunately, there is a long and sometimes rambling introduction by Hare giving his full history, with emphasis on his life-long battle with anxiety attacks and his philosophy on inequality in the corporate workplace - he and his wife currently have their own counselling practice, which he admits has been somewhat of a failure. Unfortunately, I just did not find Hare's photography to be compelling or revealing and I agree with Badger/Parr's review. However, given the reasonable price and the mystique of Hare himself I can recommend this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By martin fritter on September 1, 2013
It seems that all most of the photographs from American Interiors are included here - certainly the ones discussed by Janet Malcolm in her essay on Hare. While the introductory essay is rambling, Hare writes well for a photographer and very well for an engineer. He comes across as sensitive and intelligent. Definitely not a crank. His training in engineering may account for the uniform technical excellence of his work. The cityscapes and street views are comparable to Walker Evans, although without the extra patina Evans achieved in printing. (There is no reference to how Hare printed his work.)

There is a kind of double vision here: on the one hand, Hare clearly sees himself as doing documentary photography and not art. On the other, there is a very strong subjective continuity. So the work is at least as much testamentary as documentary.

In no sense voyeuristic and completely lacking in sentimentality and more in the tradition of Dorothea Lang than Robert Frank.

The book itself is quite large and I am concerned about the binding holding up, but the quality of the reproductions is excellent. The afterword is by a curator of the library to which Hare donated his archives on quitting photography should not be overlooked.
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