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Cheating: An Insider's Report on the Use of Race in Admissions at UCLA Paperback – April 24, 2014

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing, LLC (April 24, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1457528290
  • ISBN-13: 978-1457528293
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,040,329 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Anna VINE VOICE on May 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Superb study of UCLA's admission holistic process.

A bit of background first that inspired Tim Groseclose writing 'Cheating'. In 2012 the Committee on Undergraduate Admissions and Relations with Schools (CUARS) at UCLA intentionally obfuscated the conclusions of the 'independent' researcher originally hired to investigate whether or not UCLA used race as a determining factor in admissions. I write the word independent in quotes because Robert Mare, just like Groseclose and his research partner Richard Sander (author 'Mismatch'), also works for UCLA. Mare was extremely thorough in his research, using more variables than were provided to Groseclose/Sander. Even when Mare's work was released, UCLA turned a blind eye to the results and, in Groseclose's words, used a bit of "groupthink mixed with tiny perturbations of the truth" to gloss over the clear bullet points in Mare's executive summary. CUARS only publicly acknowledged 3 out of 9 points; the other 6 points, which underscored Mare's findings, were conveniently disregarded.

For those outside of California, and I'm one of you, Prop 209 is a "provision in the California Constitution [that states] public universities cannot use race as a factor in admission decisions." Many states have similar laws for state run universities, and many universities likely have this rule in their charters. In fact, I think most of us know this rule HAS to be posted at every place of employment. (You may be asking yourself why we have to provide our race on every government form...I wonder that myself.) In 2006, there was an anomaly in the admissions of African American students - a lower number were admitted than in preceding years. People noticed, both inside and outside of UCLA.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By DR L. SCHWEIKART on May 9, 2014
Format: Paperback
Tim Groseclose made news with his conclusive look at media bias, "Left Turn" (2011). He proved (in my mind, beyond any doubt) that not only is the media leftward biased, but that its effect on viewers and readers is to pull them slightly leftward as well.

He has followed up with an insider's view of diversity, affirmative action, and admissions at UCLA. His project began when he asked to see the raw data for admissions while a faculty member of the admissions committee---and was denied. This led him to resign from the committee, but quite publicly after obtaining the data. With support from UCLA law professor Richard Sander, who had already published a book on the biases in law schools toward blacks over Asians, Hispanics, and of course whites, Groseclose was able to pry open the records with threats of using the California Public Records Act (and, eventually using the CPRA). While some private aspects of the records prohibited Groseclose from presenting an airtight case, he was able nevertheless to show that blacks were being over-represented in admissions policies and Asians and Hispanics (and particularly Vietnamese) underrepresented. Most surprising of all, he found that richer blacks were being admitted at a rate almost 15% higher than POOR Asians.

Groseclose discovered that the mechanism for evading California's law that prohibited such discrimination was the use of "second readers" who would go through applications a second time, and they were able to identify blacks by comments the applicants gave on their personal statements, such as, "As an African-American . . .
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Doug Erlandson TOP 50 REVIEWER on May 13, 2014
Format: Paperback
I have spent a significant part of my nearly five decades of adult life associated with academia, both as a student and as a teacher at the university and community college level. Naturally, I was intrigued when Professor Groseclose sent me a copy of "Cheating" for review purposes. What I found was a book that was concise, easy to read, and fascinating on a number of levels.

While the book grew out of Groseclose's personal experience on the admissions committee at UCLA and its interpretation of the Mare report on its race-based affirmative action, it is much more than a simple expose of its practices. (For those who are unfamiliar with the situation, UCLA, as a state-supported institution, is forbidden by California law from using race as a criterion in admissions.) It also presents a well-reasoned, plausible discussion of how the mindset of the contemporary American university system seeks to justify certain deceptive practices (such as seeking to cover up the use of race-based criteria in its admission practices). As someone familiar with this mindset, I find what Groseclose says to ring true.

Groseclose is not content to write in generalities or make unsubstantiated claims. Instead, he presents a painstaking analysis of the detailed statistical material covering 2007-2009, which coincides with UCLA adopting a "holistic" admissions process. His analysis demonstrates that race-based affirmative action was at work during this period. (He also argues that the statistical material also shows that class-based affirmative action, which was and remains legal according to California law, had very little influence over who was and who was not admitted.
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Cheating: An Insider's Report on the Use of Race in Admissions at UCLA
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