Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Cherokee Bows and Arrows: How to Make and Shoot Primitive Bows and Arrows
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on November 6, 2001
Al Herrin is a living Cherokee national treasure, based on his knowledge of the Cherokee bow, its use and construction. This book gives the reader a great insight into the thinking of the Cherokee people. If you wish to make your own bow or just want a better understanding of Native American bows ... this book is a must read.
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on September 3, 2009
I found this book very readable, informative, systematic (yet organic), and well laid out. I felt that I could visualize the process described quite clearly. I have not yet made a bow, but I could certainly give it a try now, with this book's guidelines and the tools that I have on hand. I purchased the book because I am interested in archery and have Osage Orange trees growing in my yard. According to this book and many other sources, Osage orange wood is considered to be best suited in North America (and perhaps the world)for making wooden bows. The author went into great detail on how to select trees and prepare the wood and went all the way through the process of arrow and bow string making. There was quite a bit of neatly explained mathematics and calculation in getting bows to have the right dimensions and pull. The author effectively combined old-lore with personal experience, and scholarly detail. I purchased this and other bow-making materials and resources from [...]
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on August 15, 2010
If you're into self reliance then this book is for you. It covers everything that you could possibly need to know in order to go out into the woods and make a bow. The format is clear and the pictures are satisfactory.

"The Tradtional Bowyer's Bible" series is an excellent source of knowledge. But, "Cherokee Bows and Arrows" perfectly covers everything that you need to know in one book.

Save your money and get this one first.
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VINE VOICEon December 26, 2010
One of my hobbies is bowmaking and I have accumulated several books on the subject including all four volumes of The Traditional Bowyer's Bible, Volume 1. Cherokee Bows and Arrows is a valuable addition to my collection.

I requested this book for Christmas because I am particularly interested in making bows in the style made by the American Indians rather than English longbows or any of the other styles of so called "primitive" bows. In particular, I am interested in the Cherokee because they used to control their lands in the Southeast United States where I live. I learned everything I needed from this book, including a lot of additional information that I did not learn from my other books.

Some of the new information I learned was the technique for "chasing a ring" in shaping a bow, rules of thumb for bow dimensions, tips and tricks for tillering, and string making, including how to make a rawhide bowstring from squirrel skins, how to use the "pinch grip", and information on instinctive shooting.

Actually, I already know how to make a Dacron bowstring the way Herring describes, but Herrin offered a suggestion for reinforcing the loops that I had not seen anywhere else. Also a great (simple and cheap)design for a serving jig.

Al Herrin is from Oklahoma, where the Cherokee were relocated during "The Trail of Tears" period. He uses primarily Osage Orange for his bows, which was readily available in Oklahoma but was not readily available in the original Cherokee lands. His techniques apply to Black Locust (preferred by the Eastern Cherokee) or Hickory or any other suitable bow wood.

This book is only 158 pages long, but those pages are packed full of all of the information needed to successfully learn to make and shoot bows and arrows in the Cherokee style.
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on May 22, 2013
The price is too high for the infomation provided. A lot of the information is very dated. If you are getting only one book on bow and arrow making I would not recommend this. I would get the Bowyer's Bible 4.
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on November 6, 2001
Outstanding Book for anyone intersted in making their own bows.
Another seasoned Boyer called this the best book going!!!!
Robert
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on October 9, 2013
Started reading it yesterday noon and soon realised I've just spent the night reading until the end !
Crystal clear explanations, a straight-to-the-point book, no fussing around, not one spare word.
Plus a great deal of infos on Cherokee culture.
My first home-made bow will definitively be a Cherokee-like selfbow ! (coming soon!)
Plus : thorough description of how to make arrows and strings too ! (both modern and traditional ways)
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on May 31, 2015
The book was great until page thirty nine where it skipped straight to fifty. Later it does this. Again and i found alot of repeat information and not the complete process of bow making. Absolutely ridiculous. May be a misprint but i wouldnt chance buying this book just in case!
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on November 8, 2013
This is an excellent book for what I was planning to us it for. Great information on making bows and arrows!
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on April 15, 2013
I met Mr. Herrin in 1992 when I was 15 years old. He took the time to see me at his home and showed me his work in person. His book is very informative and I can tell you from personal experience that Mr. Herrin knows exactly what he is talking about. This is a good book and a sound investment. I definitely recommend buying it.
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