Customer Reviews

2
1.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
1

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on December 24, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
The title of the book is the puzzle: there is practically nothing in this book about children or teaching for children, which was a major disappointment that made the high price a complete waste of my money. This book is a pretty decent book about how to perform Tai Chi, to the extent that one can teach movement in a book (which is not much). However, it is clearly aimed at adults. There is no serious attempt to deal with the very special requirements for teaching to children, which is what I am looking for. I recommend Stuart Olson's Tai Chi for Kids to see a serious attempt at targeting children.

A further problem is some serious errors. Wudang Tai Chi is not derived from Wu, as the author claims; it is much older and has its own lineage. Wu style comes from Yang and is not very old. Gong Fu and Kung Fu are indeed the same thing, despite the author's misunderstanding to the contrary; they are simply differences between pinyin and Wade-Giles translations. The errors are considerable but not key to the core content of the book, which is handled respectably well. Just change the title!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 24, 2014
Format: Paperback
This book is an extraordinary waste of money. Not only is it patently obvious that the author has had little or no training in the education of minors, but the description of tai chi is at times bizarre. The catalogue of errors and misunderstandings is too long to expound on but here are couple of examples.

Meditation is described as "deep thinking or non-thinking", this could only have been written by someone who has not developed a regular practice themselves as it is neither. Putting the tongue behind the teeth is apparently sufficient to drop one into a state of meditation and calm oneself before an exam. The adult reader is warned not to do this whilst driving! The misunderstanding and magical thinking behind this instruction is one thing, but this is compounded by another, that to be in a meditative state is unsafe on the roads; tai chi would not have been of much use to the emperor's bodyguards had it had such a deeply relaxing effect. The confusion between being calm and sleepy could only be made by a beginner.

The reader is warned not to confuse Gung fu and Kung fu when in fact the confusion is the authors own, they are indeed the same. At one point we are told that the forward stance typical of the Wu style will give the practitioner a "six pack", which is a unique claim. The practice of the philosophy of yin and yang is claimed to "spur cell growth". Towards the end of the book the reader is advised to "brush away negative chi" after practice, the author lays special emphasis on this because she had experienced a "thumping headache" herself if she does not. This suggests to me that there is something wrong with her practice.

To write a book about the practice of any art is a considerable task, not to be undertaken lightly. It isn't easy to render into words the subtleties and nuances of a complex martial art steeped the philosophy of another culture. It might be assumed that to do so for children and their teachers would be an easier task than for the adult practitioner. This book proves that this isn't the case at all.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Tai Chi for Kids: Move with the Animals
Tai Chi for Kids: Move with the Animals by Stuart A. Olson (Hardcover - November 1, 2001)
$12.50

Mindful Movements: Ten Exercises for Well-Being
Mindful Movements: Ten Exercises for Well-Being by Thich Nhat Hanh (Spiral-bound - July 28, 2008)
$12.49

Six Healing Sounds with Lisa and Ted: Qigong for Children
Six Healing Sounds with Lisa and Ted: Qigong for Children by Lisa Spillane (Hardcover - April 15, 2011)
$12.30
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.