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Chicago 19

38 customer reviews

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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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$8.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by CAC Media and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Chicago 19 + Chicago 18 + Chicago 16
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Editorial Reviews

1988 WEA original CD complete with liner notes and art work. Disc plays great, nice booklet.


Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Reprise / Wea
  • ASIN: B000002LE2
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #86,765 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 31, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Being a fan of Chicago from the days of "Chicago Transit Authority," I must review this CD as though it were from a different group because the style of early Chicago is different from the style of this Chicago. Early Chicago was an innovative group that experimented with a variety of styles and was considered somewhat progressive. This Chicago is a high quality mellow pop music group as this 1988 release shows.

This music is so consistent in terms of style that an individual song discussion is relatively valueless. Thus, if you are familiar with the hits from this album know that you are getting an entire album of similar music.

The album reached #43 in the summer of 1988. Singles were released from the album beginning in mid 1988 until mid 1989. The first single released was "I Don't Wanna Live without Your Love" backed by "I Stand Up," which reach #3 in June 1988. The second single was "Look Away" backed by "Come in from the Night," which reached #1 in September 1988. The third single was "You're not Alone" backed by "It's Alright," which reach #10 in January 1989. The final single released was "We Can't Last Forever" backed by "One More Day," which reached #55. "What Kind of Man Would I Be" was remixed and released after the release of "Chicago's Greatest Hits 1982-1989," reaching #5 in December 1989. Thus, there were a total of seven songs from this album that were released on a single, either on the A-side or the B-side.

I find this album's consistency surprising. While there are variations in tempo and lyrics in each song, the style is constant throughout. I also think it is interesting that Chicago did not succumb to the "big hair band" style of the 80s. There are tinges of that style, but the album remains focused on ballads.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Brad on April 6, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I love the old Chicago. The original stuff was some of the most innovative music in popular music history. However, I also love the '80s Chicago sound; and this album is as great as any of them. It's hard to believe that it would be their last big album of all original material.
Yes, this album had 4 top 10 hits--all ballads. All are great songs. "I Don't Want To Live Without Your Love" was the fantastic lead single off the album. "Look Away" is a heart-rending, fantastic ballad that went all the way to number 1. "You're Not Alone" is very underrated--another heartfelt song. All of these songs beautifully showcase Bill Champlain's excellent vocals. "What Kind Of Man Would I Be" was actually released in remixed form off of the Greatest Hits album that came out a year after this album did--their last big hit. "We Can Last Forever" is a gorgeous power ballad that was actually released as the fourth single off the album--but it only peaked at number 55. Still fantastic vocals by Jason Scheff on this one.
Those are the hits--and they for the most part display Chicago's tendency towards ballads in the '80s. However, there are other noteworthy, fantastic tracks on this album that rock a little harder. The highlight is "Come In From The Night", which showcases both the horns and electric guitar and doesn't have a typical "love song" message. "Heart In Pieces" kicks off the album with a bit of uptempo heartbreak, and "I Stand Up" is also a bit uptempo. "Runaround" and "Victorious" are also fine tracks.
There truly isn't a bad song on this album. The songs shine with melody and feeling from beginning to end. If you liked any of Chicago's '80s material, then you should definitely like this one. For me, a must-have.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jim Kelsey on October 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Chicago's nineteenth album is one of those that fans either seem to love or hate - and when I say hate, I mean with a purple passion. For older fans, "Chicago 19" was definitely not the Chicago that they remember; for younger fans, especially those in high school, this was the only Chicago they knew. My review is a bit wordy, but as one who has had almost twenty years to evaluate this album, I'm going take an objective approach and try to present it for what it was and is.

When "Chicago 19" was released in 1988, the album took the group in an entirely new direction - whether the group wanted to or not. During the 1980's, the music industry was dictated by the producer and the record label. The overall goal - to produce hits. With Chicago, this trend began in 1982 with "Chicago 16." Chicago had been in a slump since Terry Kath's death and Columbia Records dropped them in 1981 due to declining record sales from their previous albums. David Foster was brought in to revamp the group. Foster had the group collaborate with outside songwriters and brought in studio musicians to augment the groups sound. The outcome was stunning! "Hard to Say I'm Sorry" went all the way to the top of the charts, making it the second #1 single for Chicago. Two years later, Foster went on to produce their most successful album, "Chicago 17," as well as "Chicago 18" in 1986.

For "Chicago 19," two new producers were chosen: Chas Sandford and Ron Nevison. Sandford was a songwriter who had previously worked with Stevie Nicks and John Waite; Nevison a well-established producer who's successes included artists like Survivor, Ozzy Osborne, Bad Company, Heart, and Jefferson Airplane, just to name a few.
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