Customer Reviews

46
Chicken Sunday
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$7.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2003
CHICKEN SUNDAY is another one of my favorite Polacco books. This is a fabulous and emotionally touching story of an interracial friendship and the children's journey of love and service. Young Patricia (who has written another great episode about her rich and colorful life) and her two best friends Stewart and Winston (who happen to be black) want to buy the boy's gramma (Eula Mae) a hat that she has wanted but could not afford to buy. Since the death of her beloved babushka, Eula Mae also serves as Patricia's surrogate grandmother. The children witness an act of racism on the hat shop owned by the Holocaust survivor Mr. Kodinski. They were going to ask Kodinski for a job to raise the money to buy Eula Mae her favorite hat. Mr. Kodinski sees the children and assumes that they are responsible for the act of violence. Ultimately, the children redeem themselves by making Pysanky eggs for Mr. Kodinski to sell in his store. He tells them the story of his life and then gives the trio the hat. Naturally Eula Mae is thrilled.

CHICKEN SUNDAY is named after the chicken dinner that Eula Mae feed the children every Sunday after Church. This is another multi-cultural book teaching children that it is okay to have friendships with people who are different. Incidentally, Patricia remains close to these boys to this very day. It also exposes children to different types of racism. This book has a wonderful lesson for children and adults.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on July 16, 2000
This author writes stories that really relate to the problems children face in today's society. She has the ability to write in a manner in which the reader feels he or she is being directly talked to at that given moment. A reader can also dig deep within his or her self to find thoughts and memories of happenings. in their lives that directly relate to the events and thoughts of her stories.
This book is about the diversity in the upbringing of children. One must believe that children are still being raised to know right from wrong. Throughout the story the children are being guided by a significant other that has very strong morals and beliefs. The children in turn have held those morals and beliefs to be their backbone in life. The children are kind, caring, helpful, and polite individuals because of their upbringing. They stand up for what they believe is right. All children should have the right to voice their opinion in a positive manner. All people have the right to be heard.
This book can be used in so many ways to teach a variety of lessons. The lessons could be about childhood memories, historical events, family life, customs, places, and different types of people. The strongest lesson to be taught could be on the six pillars of good character. A variety of different uses could be developed in regards to this book.
Children need guidance on how to do something and in what manner it should be done. Teachers and students need to be good role models for one another. This book stresses the importance of being a good person and why.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on November 17, 2002
This book speaks volumes . . . especially how a life can be changed forever through a simple act of love and kindness. It seemed that Miss Eula was a beautiful person who just loved and cared for everyone around her by continually demonstrating the true principles of faith, hope, and love.
This book truly emphasizes those things that matter most: a faith in God, a loving family, and good friends.
Chicken Sunday was not only heart-warming and touching, but to me it clearly stated the importance of allowing that little "light" within our hearts to shine no matter what!
This book is an excellent educational tool, and can be easily used in various thematic units such as: family and friends.
I have always enjoyed Patricia Polacco books and will continue to read them to my loved ones and classes for many, many years to come!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
I am a big fan of Patricia Polacco, she's one of my favorite children's author/illustrators. This book lives up to my expectations: Warm, big-hearted pictures seem to burst from its pages--the images fill your heart and mind like old memories brought vividly to life. Ms. Polacco also places real photographs of real neighbors (in Oakland, California) amidst her soft, rolling illustrations, adding the intimacy of a scrapbook to this tale of interracial/intergenerational friendship and love.
After two boys are mistakenly accused by Mr. Kodinsky's shop (Mr. Kodinsky is a Holocaust survivor, look for the faded blue number on his left arm) their grandmother and mother help them make beautifully decorated eggs to show Mr. Kodinsky that they really are good boys. The ensueing bonds of friendship and treasured memories make for a wonderful family reading experience, especially for children attuned (or who need some exposure) to warmth and the joy of giving.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on April 14, 2001
Poignancy, humour, and detail are hallmarks of Polacco's books...and Chicken Sunday shines in all of these. Our girls (5 & 7)loved it so much that they asked for it to be read again as soon as we got to the end. All the telling things of a child's world, including being unfairly accused, secret hidey holes, and longing to show an adult how much they love them, are there. In addition there is a wonderful richness to the language, with images such as "a voice like deep thunder and slow rain".
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 19, 1997
As usual Patricia Polacco hits the mark with the lively characters and dialogue. The children are not depicted as sugary sweet, but as real life children. The grandmother is one that probably anyone over 40 remembers as their grandmother. It brings back memories of wanting something and sacrificing for it. In the world today that lesson can sometimes fall on deaf ears. The illustrations are the usual high standard that is evident in of all Polacco's books. A must read for families that remember the good old days and would like to have this generation remember them also
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on April 7, 2000
This book is wonderful. Patricia Polacco is a wonderful authorwho tells such real life stories. I love the fact that they worked sohard to buy the hat for Miss Eula. Also she does beautiful illustrations. From the pictures you can find out so much more about the story. The language she uses in this book is so real that you can almost really hear them talking. I would reccomend this book to anyone who likes to read. Patricis Polacco can touch the heart of all people, young and old!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 17, 2012
The themes that are presented in this book are beautiful. Polacco does a wonderful job of showing how the power of love and friendship can far outweigh our differences. Once again, Polacco uses her own personal story to illustrate how people can come together regardless of their race, religion, or culture. This story is about her close friendship she had formed with two boys (who were a different race and religion than her) and their grandma (Eula Mae). Eula Mae was also considered Patricia's grandma because her babushka had died. Early on in the book, Polacco paints a picture of love and family despite their differing backgrounds and race.

These three children want to buy a hat for Eula Mae that she has been admiring in the shop window for a long time. While trying to ask the hat-shop owner (who is a Holocaust survivor) if they could earn money by working for him, they get accused of doing something that they did not do because of bad timing. They realize they must do everything they can to show the shop owner that they are honest, good children and didn't do what he thought they had done. The young girl teaches the other two boys how to make Pysanky eggs, and they give them to the shop owner as a gift. He admires their courage and ends up doing something very kind for them in return. Through this situation, the theme that stands out is that of being honest and always doing what you can to make things right.

Polacco also celebrates the different cultures present in this book, for example, the Pysanky eggs from the Ukraine, and the fried chicken that Eula Mae makes on Sundays after church (where the title comes from). These very different people are brought together in a beautiful way in spite of their differences, and they end up becoming friends. In the end, Eula Mae receives the hat she has wanted for so long, and the children experience a very rewarding feeling of doing something kind for someone else.

I encourage teachers of young-intermediate students to read this book to them so they can recognize the many important lessons that can be learned from it. No matter what age you are, these lessons of the heart help to remind us how love, friendship, and good deeds can bring people together no matter how different you may be.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 21, 2009
I read Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco. First the kids want to buy Grandma a hat for Easter and they tried to raise money. One day they walk by Mr. Kodinskis's store into an alley. The older boys threw eggs at Mr.Kodinskis's door. Then he thought that they threw the eggs, but they didn't throw the eggs at the door. So they went home and made ''PYSANKY EGGS'', for Mr. Kodinskis, After that, they give them to him. They sell the eggs to make money and he gives them the hat for Grandma. I like this book because it is interesting. I think 3rd graders and 4th graders would like this book because they would understand the book and also tell their grandmothers. I like it better this time than last time because I understand it. I have read it before.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 10, 1999
I read it in class. I loved the project that we did about it! We made signs with Pysanky eggs and egg baskets and we had to make a price. And I made a basketwith eggs in it and it cost buy one get one free for a dollar. kay that's all! Oh, and my mom came and showed us how to make pysanky eggs! kay... THATS IT
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.