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Child of the Hunt Unbound – Import, October, 1998


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Product Details

  • Unbound
  • Publisher: Pocket Pulse (October 1998)
  • ISBN-10: 0743431383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743431385
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)

More About the Author

CHRISTOPHER GOLDEN is the award-winning, bestselling author of such novels as The Myth Hunters, Wildwood Road, The Boys Are Back in Town, The Ferryman, Strangewood, Of Saints and Shadows, and (with Tim Lebbon) The Map of Moments. He has also written books for teens and young adults, including Poison Ink, Soulless, and the thriller series Body of Evidence, honored by the New York Public Library and chosen as one of YALSA's Best Books for Young Readers. Upcoming teen novels include a new series of hardcover YA fantasy novels co-authored with Tim Lebbon and entitled The Secret Journeys of Jack London.

A lifelong fan of the "team-up," Golden frequently collaborates with other writers on books, comics, and scripts. In addition to his recent work with Tim Lebbon, he co-wrote the lavishly illustrated novel Baltimore, or, The Steadfast Tin Soldier and the Vampire with Mike Mignola. With Thomas E. Sniegoski, he is the co-author of the book series OutCast and The Menagerie, as well as comic book miniseries such as Talent, currently in development as a feature film. With Amber Benson, Golden co-created the online animated series Ghosts of Albion and co-wrote the book series of the same name.
As an editor, he has worked on the short story anthologies The New Dead and British Invasion, among others, and has also written and co-written comic books, video games, screenplays, the online animated series Ghosts of Albion (with Amber Benson) and a network television pilot.

The author is also known for his many media tie-in works, including novels, comics, and video games, in the worlds of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Hellboy, Angel, and X-Men, among others.

Golden was born and raised in Massachusetts, where he still lives with his family. His original novels have been published in more than fourteen languages in countries around the world. Please visit him at www.christophergolden.com

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 82 customer reviews
SMG is my role model!
Cherise
In this book you also get to see what kind of sacrafices Buffy is willing to make for her friends, and how much she really loves them.
Courtney Kay
The story was very well written and the characters were very well-depicted.
Slayerette

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 28, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Christopher Golden and Nancy Holder write the best Buffy the Vampire Slayer novels, not just because they are good writers but because they understand both the characters and the mythos of the Slayer. Even though the stories are set in Sunnydale, Golden and Holder have a keen appreciation for the Old World-ness of the Slayer's world. This is not just a question of Giles coming from England, Angel from Ireland and Jenny from the land of the gypsies, but rather a recognition that when you are talking about ancient evil you have to skip across the ocean because that is where our sense of vampires, demons and things that go bump in the night originates. "Child of the Hunt" represents this sensibility quite nicely.
Buffy and her cohorts are enjoying a traveling Renaissance fair that has come to Sunnydale, but while they enjoy most of what they see they do not like the way the visitors treat Roland, their court jester. That is not the only significant development in town, for roaming the countryside are the minions of the Wild Hunt, in the service of the Erl King and with a taste for flesh. Of course there is a strange and terrible secret that links Roland to the eerie visitors. The Slayer wants to get involved, but Buffy must beware the awful curse, which dictates that no one can see the face of the leader of the Wild Hunt and live. Unless, that is, they join the hunt and take an oath to serve the Erl King.
This is not a story about the end of life as we know it, like a Buffy season finale or Golden and Holder's justly celebrated Gatekeeper Trilogy, but then that is not the point. This is a more intimate story, where Buffy is fighting to save Roland more so than she is to stop the Erl King.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Heather L. Teig on August 13, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a fan of the TV show I was excited when I discovered the books about her but at the same time hesitant, thinking they might ruin things for me. The opposite happened. Now the space between Tuesdays seems to drag on forever, for after reading the book you feel even more a part of Buffy's inner circle. What makes the book even better than the show is you get to read each characters thoughts, hopes, and dreams.
This book isn't simply another Buffy episode either. It would be a major production for any of this book to make it to the small screen. You don't need it to either, the authors' imagery and descriptions allow the imagination to create your own show.
The plot is exciting. I couldn't put the book down, and if I hadn't moved on to another Buffy book by the authors I would be reading it again, and again, and again...
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Nicole on December 17, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I did a report on this book. I'm in seventh grade but I love to read Buffy books. This book was written greatly and it is my favorite book now. I was very impressed with the writing and I was so anxious to read what happened that I couldn't even put it down. I recommend this book to everybody I even lent it to my mom. My teacher was so impressed with my report that she actually asked me where she could get a copy. I have read this book four times. I loved the fairs and Roland was really cool. All you people who have read the book you probably know what I'm talking about with the King Erl. Thanx for reading my review.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Branden Poole on September 24, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Whenever I read a commercial tie-in book (basically, any novel that's based upon an existing television show, movie, video game / RPG system, or comic book), I'm always wary. Usually you're left with a sub-par story that just happens to feature the same characters that you know and love from the initial source material. So when I started reading "Child of the Hunt", I didn't have high expectations.
I was pleasantly surprised, however. The book is able to capture much of the spirit and voice of the television show (of which I'm a fan). The credit for this of course lies in the authors, who are well versed in the Buffy franchise, as both have written previous novels on the subject and Mr. Golden alone has contributed about as much to the "Buffyverse" as Joss Whedon himself at this point. There were many elements from the TV series that the authors were able to translate well into the novel, such as the distinct humor of the show, the dead-on characterization of the cast, as well as some of the more serious nature of the program.
I found the story to be very interesting and inspired as well. On the show it's common to see Buffy take on all manner of vampire and demon, but the program usually doesn't stray into the realm of the fae. Golden and Holder provided a refreshing deviation from the normal Buffy villain (delving deep into mythological lore to bring us a unique creature of legend). The story here is very dark as well; it touches upon the runaway population of Sunnydale, as well as feelings of loss, fear, despair and abandonment. The authors do a great job of setting up the mood for the story. The villains here are truly evil and ruthless, and the violence (of which there is a good deal) is at times quite brutal. This works for the best of the plot, though.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Talley on January 8, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
My second book I've read from my favorite hit t.v show and again, I am impressed! The writing is great and the characters are so lifelike and true to form. What I like about the books are the fact that we finally get to delve into the collective minds of the complicated characters that are Sunnydale's 'Scooby Gang'. A vampire slayer, a watcher, a witch, a werewolf, a vampire, a wisecracker human and a rich girl who keeps getting mixed up with the gang, even if she pretends she can't stand them. Like the show, the book was beyond entertaining and well worth the money.
This novel, 324 pages, could easily have been a great episode. It was a very different departure from what we've seen in the show. A weird group of traveling renaissance faire people that arrives in Sunnydale, CA, (a.k.a, the Hellmouth) who are not only weird, but have something to do with a sinister group of horsebacked, hellhound dark faerie roaming the woods around Sunnydale looking for souls.
The Scooby Gang think a faire would be uncool, but find themselves drawn to the faire anyway and experience a feeling of dread and doom. Jousting contests, human chest matches, knights and ladies and a court jester that all seem a little too...real.
Caught up in a whirl of confusion, the gang experience the dark faerie for themselves and find out the faire is the least of their problems. The Erl King has brought the Wild Hunt to the Hellmouth and the gang must stop them before all the lost souls in town become part of the Hunt forever. Not only does the Slayer have to worry about the king, but the jester in the faire is not what he seems...he is destined to become the Slayer's mortal adversary....
Tracy Talley~@
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