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No Child Left Behind Primer (Peter Lang Primer) Paperback – January 30, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-0820478449 ISBN-10: 082047844X Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: Peter Lang Primer
  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Peter Lang International Academic Publishers; 2 edition (January 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 082047844X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820478449
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #505,199 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The Authors: Frederick M. Hess is a resident scholar and Director of Education Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute as well as Executive Editor of Education Next. His many books include Common Sense School Reform (2004), Spinning Wheels (1999/2004), Revolution at the Margins (2002), and A Qualified Teacher in Every Classroom (2004). He is a faculty associate of the Harvard University Program on Education Policy and Governance. A former high school social studies teacher, he holds an M.Ed. in teaching and curriculum and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University.
Michael J. Petrilli is Vice President for National Programs and Policy at the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, a Washington-based school reform organization. He served as a Bush administration appointee in the U.S. Department of Education (2001-2005), where he helped coordinate No Child Left Behind’s (NCLB) public school choice and supplemental services provisions and oversaw discretionary grant programs for charter schools, alternative teacher certification, and high school reform. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Education Next, Education Week, The Public Interest, and other venues. He holds a B.A. in political science and a teaching certificate in secondary social studies from the University of Michigan.

More About the Author

An educator, political scientist and author, Rick Hess studies K-12 and higher education issues. His books include Cage-Busting Leadership, The Same Thing Over and Over, Education Unbound, Common Sense School Reform, Revolution at the Margins, and Spinning Wheels, and he writes the popular Education Week blog "Rick Hess Straight Up." Rick's work has appeared in scholarly and popular outlets such as Teachers College Record, Harvard Education Review, Social Science Quarterly, Urban Affairs Review, American Politics Quarterly, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Phi Delta Kappan, Educational Leadership, the Washington Post, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Atlantic, and National Review. Rick serves as executive editor of Education Next, as lead faculty member for the Rice Education Entrepreneurship Program, on the review boards for the Broad Prize in Urban Education and the Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools, and on the boards of directors of the National Association of Charter School Authorizers and 4.0 SCHOOLS. A former high school social studies teacher, he has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Pennsylvania, Georgetown University, Rice University, and Harvard University. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Government, as well as an M.Ed. in Teaching and Curriculum, from Harvard.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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All in all, a book I'd recommend to anyone who's studying education or is thinking about becoming a teacher.
wkg495
I still think NCLB was a mistake, and the authors do a good job of explaining the criticisms of the law, but I finally feel like I really understand it.
Henry Oldman
Overall, it was a very informative book, and if you know nothing about NCLB, this is probably a good book to read.
R. Olive

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Henry Oldman on April 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
Along with millions of other teachers, 've spent the last five years talking about and trying to understand No Child Left Behind. It was hard to figure out what the politicians were thinking, or to sort through all the competing claims about AYP, testing, highly qualified teachers, spending, supplemental services, and the rest of it. Cutting through the confusion, the authors have offered a clear, straightforward explanation. They explain the law's history, its major parts, and provide a really helpful summary of public opinion and the politics of making the law work.

I feel like I finally have a sense of what the folks in D.C. were thinking. In fact, after the explanation of the history that led to NCLB and the reasoning for it, I'm almost a little sympathetic to them. I finally understand why we've all been so confused about what the law requires and how its testing systems is supposed to work. (Turns out, it's not that we're confused so much as it's the law that's confused-- this is how they designed it!). I still think NCLB was a mistake, and the authors do a good job of explaining the criticisms of the law, but I finally feel like I really understand it. And, after reading this book, I'm happy to report that NCLB strikes me as a lot less scary. It makes more sense and seems more manageable. And, strangely enough, I've got more respect for all the different people involved in shaping it.

As for readability, I was impressed. The book is clear, jargon-free, and easy to read. Not what I'd expect from a couple of Washington DC policy people. I wish more books in our field read like this.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By wkg495 on April 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
It's not often that I read a book on something like No Child Left Behind that I can get through in one sitting. Usually, I read a chapter, and then push it aside for a week, and then try to read another. But this thing was so straightforward and clear, that I sped right through it. The authors are surprisingly fair for such a controversial subject. In fact, I would have liked to see them take more of a point of view and offer their own insights on the law, but they really stayed pretty arm's length the whole way through.

My favorite parts were their explanation of the history and politics of the law, and their explanation of how the public feels about it. In fact, they've got this interesting argument-- that's new to me-- that No Child Left Behind looks more like a Democratic law passed by Lyndon Johnson than a Republican law pushed by George Bush. But I also found the explanations of spending, and scientific research, and the highly-qualified teacher provision really helpful. All in all, a book I'd recommend to anyone who's studying education or is thinking about becoming a teacher.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Olive on October 11, 2007
Format: Paperback
I bought this book for a research paper I was writing about No Child Left Behind, and I wanted to gain more understanding about what the act was. Overall, it was a very informative book, and if you know nothing about NCLB, this is probably a good book to read.
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