Customer Reviews


118 Reviews
5 star:
 (51)
4 star:
 (25)
3 star:
 (17)
2 star:
 (9)
1 star:
 (16)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


90 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must own game to show off your Kinect (still great w/o Kinect)
Child of Eden - The good
- Beautiful graphics and audio soundtrack
- Immersive Kinect controls
- Use of up to 4 controllers as vibrating force feedback
- Well-designed shmup (shoot'em up) with intricate gameplay-scoring mechanics

Child of Eden - The not so good
- Shmups tend to be shorter games than other genres
- Menu navigation...
Published on June 14, 2011 by Patrick H. Nguyen

versus
31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's ok for $25
Was expecting more based on all these good reviews. It's basically flapping your arms around as you're shown computer art; more specifically flapping your right arm most of the time and waving around your left arm if you see purple. It's ok, glad I got it for $25 in the BYOG1F sale at best buy. Other kinect games (e.g. kinect adventures, kinect sports, and dance...
Published on July 10, 2011 by Com


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

90 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must own game to show off your Kinect (still great w/o Kinect), June 14, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Child of Eden - The good
- Beautiful graphics and audio soundtrack
- Immersive Kinect controls
- Use of up to 4 controllers as vibrating force feedback
- Well-designed shmup (shoot'em up) with intricate gameplay-scoring mechanics

Child of Eden - The not so good
- Shmups tend to be shorter games than other genres
- Menu navigation can be confusing because it sometimes switches between Kinect and controller
- sitting position does not control as well as standing (higher Kinect sensor placement preferred as well)

Menu navigation can be with either the Kinect of the game controller. Menu navigation is a little confusing because it doesn't seem you can go completely controller-free to navigation. It appears you can but often the game seems to switch to controller mode and you have to press a button on the controller to switch back to Kinect menu control. In general, the menus are a little confusing in terms of selecting missions.

The game is definitely meant to be played with Kinect controls rather than the standard 360 game controller. Combined with the controllers for force feedback, controlling with the Kinect is the most immersive experience where you just forget the interface and become one with the game.

If you place your Kinect at waist level, the game control appears to suffer a slight bit. The game appears to control better with the Kinect higher up, especially when targeting near the bottom of the TV. It's not a major difference but if you can, put the Kinect above the TV. The logic also applies to sitting down. Child of Eden does allow you to play in the sitting position but when sitting down, targeting objects near the bottom of the screen can be hard because if the Kinect is placed low and you're sitting down, when you move your hand to crotch level to target low objects, the cursor will spaz while the Kinect is figuring out where your hand is. The game controls better in the standing position as well. I played a large chunk of the game with the Kinect at waist level and it played fine.

The game uniquely allows you to use up to 4 controllers as vibrating devices so if you wear baggy pants or shorts with pockets, it's an awesome experience. I thought it would be a gimmick, but it just feels awesome. It's not just generic vibrations. Different explosions produce different effects. The vibrations also appear to be spatial and positional as well. There's also some pulsations due to the various music beats. You have to experience this pants vibration to understand how good it feels. I only have 3 wireless 360 controllers so I didn't have the full 4 controller experience but it felt great nonetheless. I also tried 2 controllers in the front pockets of my shorts and it worked great. It really recreates the atmosphere of being in a game machine at the local arcade.

The game starts with an introductory movie in high definition that looks like something out of the mind of Tim Burton. You see a real actress model playing Yumi where she's walking through a surreal forest scene with augmented CGI. Her images will intersperse throughout the game. The actual in-game graphics are very good. Personally, the art direction is merely good for me since the artwork is somewhat abstract and there's not as much artistic license as I would've liked, but my lack of enthusiasm is merely personal preference. The framerate is extremely solid and shows no obvious moments of slowdown.

The first mission is the tutorial level where they teach you the game mechanics. The right hand is used to paint the various enemies on-screen. You just move your hand over the enemies which locks onto them. Once they are locked you do a simple wrist flick to unleash the explosions. You don't have to do a dramatic motion to unleash your weaponry like you may have seen in various hands-on gameplay videos, just a quick flick of the wrist. The left hand controls your tracer weapon which is like a machine gun. There is no locking of targets. You simply maneuver the onscreen cursor with your hand which autofires.

The trick is figuring out which weapon to use on which enemies so you'll be switching back and forth between the weapons constantly. As part of the game mechanics, the game doesn't allow you to use both weapons simultaneously. They designed the game to force you to switch hands thru the different types of enemies so weapon choice is not merely preference. For example, in order to destroy enemy bullets, you need to use the tracer gun (machine gun) instead of the standard weapon. Raising both arms (a la an orchestral conductor) will unleash your smart bomb which clears the screen of bad guys. General movement of the screen is on-rails like most shmups. However, you can shift the view in a direction by moving the cursor to the edge of the screen. During the frantic scenes where enemies are filling the screen, you'll often be waving your right hand as if you're erasing a chalkboard in order to paint enemies and launch explosions quickly.

Targeting via your hands is wonderfully done as you never feel like you're fighting the controls. You'll feel part Mickey Mouse in The Sorcerer's Apprenctice, part Tom Cruise in The Minority Report. I've never liked the Rez controls whether it was on the Sega Dreamcast, Sony Playstation 2 or Xbox 360. Every tiem I played Rez, I kept wishing the game used a mouse. I hated the subtle autoaiming in Rez to compensate for a game controller. But in Kinect, it feels amazing and accurate with your hand. You rarely overshoot the cursor like with a game controller.

Game mechanics-wise, there are multiple ways to play Child of Eden like most shmups (shoot-em-up games). If you simply want to kill enemies and finish the game, you can play frantically and move your hands rapidly. If you want to score higher and increase your multiplier, you have to play more precisely and deliberately. For example, you should target more enemies before launching exposions. Also, the more you launch missiles to the beat of the music, the higher your multiplier score will be. This sounds easier than it actually is. It's hard to build a high multiplier because you have to switch to your tracer weapon in order to shoot down enemy bullets. There are lots of little nuances to the scoring mechanics that I haven't figured out yet. I'll adjust the review if as I find them.

Like other shmups, the screen can become quite hectic where it's hard to distinguish between debris, enemy bullets, or enemies themselves so it requires constant attention to quickly identify the various elements. If you love shmups, you'll love Child of Eden.

Of course people will note Child of Eden's lineage to Rez because Tetsuya Mizuguchi was basically the father of both games. But for people that don't know Rez, Child of Eden is like playing your typical shmup such as Raiden or Ikaruga or Torus Trooper or even more old school, games like Galaga or After Burner. The only difference is Child of Eden plays from a first person perspective rather than third person.

I cannot comment on the length of Child of Eden as I have not yet finished the game. However, from reading other reviews, it appears the game is short. Shmups tend to be short so this is more a negative on the genre than on child of Eden (I finished Raiden IV rather quickly). So replayability, such as with Pac-Man Championship Edition and other such games, comes from trying to achieve higher scores. There are a number of things to unlock which lengthens the game somewhat. Length is mostly likely the greatest weakness in this fine game.

There are no multiplayer game modes. Xbox Live support is restricted on online leaderboards. It's unclear if there will be any DLC levels in the future.

Bottom line: Child of Eden is a must-own Kinect game. There are now 3 games that people universally use to show off the Kinect: Dance Central, Kinect sports, and now Child of Eden. This game is defined by the Kinect controls and the amazing music. The music is so well integrated into the gameplay and is not just background noise. Most age groups will enjoy playing Child of Eden except for young children whose dexterity might not be high enough to subtly control the cursor. If you don't have a Kinect, it's still a great game, but you feel a bit disconnected. If you do have a Kinect, it becomes a phenomenal game. If you've never like shmups, Child of Eden may make you a convert.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


51 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Kinect Game yet!!, June 15, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
I received the game from Amazon yesterday and all I can say this is a must buy. I have not played the game without the Kinect (you do have the option to do so). Also I have the Kinect on top of my DLP (the first review said that it works better if it was placed higher).

This is the best game out for the Kinect yet (6/14/11), period (Sorry Kinect Sports, your 2nd best now).

The Graphics are simply amazing, easily a 10. The controls were very good, and the sensor picked up and tracked my arm movements very easily. The pace of the game was great (and some parts are frantic).

You use your right hand to target your laser and after you lock on up to 8 targets a quick flick of your wrist fires the laser. You use your left hand to target and fire a rapid fire gun that can shoot down enemy missiles that are fired at you. When you raise both hands you unleash a powerful bomb that basically nukes everything on the screen. There are blue balls that are periodically released that you have to shoot to regenerate your health (from when you run into enemies or are hit by their missiles). You can earn bonus points (with Good or Perfect ratings) based on how you fire your laser with the beat of the music. After you clear an entire section you get your score and a rating on how you performed.

Additional screens are unlocked based on the number of stars earned.

I can't stress how much fun I had playing this game, It's that good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's ok for $25, July 10, 2011
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Was expecting more based on all these good reviews. It's basically flapping your arms around as you're shown computer art; more specifically flapping your right arm most of the time and waving around your left arm if you see purple. It's ok, glad I got it for $25 in the BYOG1F sale at best buy. Other kinect games (e.g. kinect adventures, kinect sports, and dance central) are always an instant hit with guests when they come round, but I'm not sure this will go down as well as it's less intuitive and needs some explaining -- and even then it's not going to be everyone's cup of tea.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This game NEEDS to be bought if you have Kinect!, June 15, 2011
By 
Chris (New York City) - See all my reviews
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Seriously, why doesn't this game have more publicity?

Like reviewers and the developers of the game have said (and I have confirmed), this game is better with Kinect than the standard controller. Very fluid, lag-free and immersive; this game truly shows Kinect's potential.

Seriously, you'll be kicking yourself later if you don't buy this game!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A unique blend of style, artistry, and music makes Child of Eden an easy recommendation for any Kinect owners., June 17, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Overview:

Developed by Q Entertainment and published by Ubisoft, Child of Eden is a first person shooter. But it's also a game unlike almost every other first person shooter out there. Dazzling visual and audio effects, brilliant level design, smooth controls, and a catchy technopop soundtrack form a solidarity with which Child of Eden rises to greatness.

Story:

If you haven't heard of Child of Eden, the game is essentially an on-the-rails first person shooter. The story is set in a distant yet near future, where space travel has been accomplished and the internet is referred to as "Eden." The first child to be born in space, Lumi, is saved into Eden's archives. Centuries later, scientists attempt to recreate Lumi from her record in Eden; to their dismay, Eden becomes corrupted (by futuristic spyware ads?). As the player, you are tasked with purifying Eden of this viral intrusion and saving the new Lumi from being destroyed.

Sounds weird? You bet. But the story succeeds not because the subject matter is unconventional, but because its implementation is unconventional as well. There is no epic narrative here, no real dialogue to speak of. The viral intrusion isn't represented by some all-powerful avatar whom you have to defeat. And yet somehow the game manages to capture your attention all the same. Lumi, who is also the face of the mysterious real life band Genki Rockets (whose music is featured prominently in the game), is captivating in her innocence and beauty. As you come upon the penultimate seconds of each mission, flashes of her face and figure as she sways gracefully to the music - freed from the viral infection - just seem to draw you in further.

Gameplay:

Ultimately, the story is only a backdrop for the innovative gameplay. There are two modes of playing Child of Eden, one with the standard controller and one using Kinect. In both versions you are equipped with the same arsenal of weapons: a tracking missle launcher capable of destroy viral incursions with devastating accuracy, a purple shooter used to eliminate enemy projectiles and similarly colored enemies who are especially vulnerable to rapid fire, and a "Euphoria" attack, which is essentially a screen-clearing bomb attack.

Child of Eden is an on-the-rails game, meaning you move along a set and predefined pathway. Along the way, enemies and powerups will spiral around you, and it's your job to eliminate and/or capture as many of these infections as possible. As you destroy them, you rack up points for efficiency and thoroughness. The Tracking missile is the most effective weapon to use against most enemies, and if you time your attacks along with the soundtrack, you'll earn increasingly rewarding bonuses.

Some situations will require you to use your purple repeater gun, keeping the levels from becoming too monotonous. Enemies also come in dozens of different varieties, each with their own behaviors, strengths and weaknesses - some even react differently to your two main weapons in a visual way. Clearing through wave upon wave of these oddly-designed (cybernetic worms, jellyfish, whales, and phoenixes all need to be purged) viruses is fun to do and watch. Finally, your Euphoria attack can save you from being overwhelmed, but be aware that you must collect Euphoria powerups before you can use them in battle.

You can't discuss Child of Eden without its compatability with Kinect. While using the controller is slightly more fluid and precise, there's no denying just how enjoyable it is to blast through the deluge of enemies using Kinect's motion controls. Using Kinect, your right hand becomes your homing missiles, requiring you to flick your hand forward after you've locked onto your targets. Your left hand becomes your purple machine gun. Raising both hands above your head activates Euphoria. Playing Child of Eden with Kinect is an infinitely more rewarding experience; the motion controls are smooth and the movement really brings you into the action. You feel powerful, as if your hands are literally shaping the world around you. The camera can occasionally be a little jittery, but this is a minor annoyance at worst.

Graphics & Sound:

The game succeeds on a technical and artistic level as well. The graphics in the game are vibrant, and the game plays smoothly, despite the smorgasbord of cybernetic invaders that swirl through your entire screen. The backgrounds feel living, the enemies animate fluidly and sometimes shiny lights are really just all a game developer needs to keep your attention. The game also achieves on an artistic level as well, managing to capture a mix of cybernetic, matrix-code feel with an organic twist. It's almost like you're floating in a techno dream that you can't tear yourself away from, even if you wanted to.

I've already mentioned the catchy tunes that play in the background as you blast your way through the game, and how you earn bonuses if you time your attacks to synch with the rhythm of the beat. On screen flashes of "Good!" and "Perfect!" accompany your attacks when you pull them off successfully, and these are further joined by musical chimes, notes, even lyrical melodies that meld seamlessly into the soundtrack. When you get into a good groove, your attacks harmonize with the soundtrack into explosions of music that only further highlight Child of Eden's artistic vision.

Other Notes:

The one complaint I have is that the game can be over too quickly. You unlock new levels by earning stars from each stage, but in total (at the moment) there are only five levels. These could easily and conceivably be completed in an hour, for the particularly rhythmic and shooter-oriented gamers. There is a plethora of unlockables, including concept art, videos, and collectible items for Lumi's Garden (which is essentially the title screen). Still, at the end of the day I wish there were more actual levels of gameplay to be had. Here's hoping that Ubisoft and Q Entertainment might see fit to release some DLC.

Final Thoughts:

Anybody can enjoy Child of Eden, but for those who see videogames as more than just mindless entertainment, I can not recommend it enough. Stunning visual and artistic design unite with musical and auditory splendor to create a game that is worthy of being called art.

Recommended For:
+ Fans of First person shooters
+ Fans of games with extraordinary style and vision
+ Anybody with a Kinect and $50 to spare for the game.

Not recommended For:
- People with Epilepsy. Like, seriously.
- People without a Kinect. The game might be better with a Kinect, but don't buy a kinect just for this game. With only 5 levels to blast your way through, it'll be a short-lived high for spending the $149.99 for.

See more reviews like this one at my blog: boredomsadvocate.blogspot.com/
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally, Kinect is going in the right direction, June 22, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Just picked up this game yesterday after reading the reviews on here and I have to say I am glad I did. To say that this game fully immerses you in the play would be an understatement. The controls are so intuitive, so after a few minutes of figuring everything out you'll be on your way to blasting....viruses? Whatever the heck it is your shooting I'll tell you its a lot of fun.

Also, as a "hardcore gamer" I expected this game to be big on the colors, music, and explosions but lacking in story. From what I saw yesterday (granted I only played for about an hour) there actually appears to be a decent storyline in place. This game is exactly the kind of thing that Kinect was made for...if you are on the fence or if you have been waiting for Kinect to finally come out with something good go grab this game and play it; you won't be disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A stunning work of interactive art, June 16, 2011
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
This is a really interesting and beautiful game.
A lot of people have mentioned it is short - even while praising it. I actually don't find it excessively short.
The worst part of the game is the long and unskippable opening cinematic. That's kind of typical of Japanese games though.
The Kinect controls are well done and very responsive.

Be prepared to kind of scratch your head and wonder what's going on the first few minutes, but then you get it and it is awesome. At its core, this game is "just a shooter", but that doesn't do it justice. It is like saying an Ansel Adams is just a photograph. There is an art here that you don't see very often in this medium.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never thought I'd play a game like this!, June 15, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
This game is truly something special, and you can't help but smile while playing it. What surprised me most was how well it controlled with the kinect. It followed my hand very quickly around the screen and there was very little lag.

This game is just pure fun.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally - A Reason to Dust Off the Kinect I got for Christmas!, June 19, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Intrigued by the Project Natal demos, but knowing there were no good games, I told my wife not to buy me a Kinect last Christmas. For some reason (I guess so it would be a big surprise), she bought me one anyways. Sure enough, I played the demo game that came with it about a dozen times, then unplugged it and stuck it under the TV. That was in January. Now its June, and I've finally taken the Kinect back out again. The reason - Child of Eden.

I took one look at the demo videos online and knew that finally someone had come out with a really enjoyable game for the Kinect. I went out and bought this game yesterday morning, and let me tell you, I was so right! This is probably one of the only games I've bought at the release price, and so far I don't regret it at all. The Kinect controls are unbelievably responsive, and it makes it soooo easy to get immersed in the game. The spectacular music that you are rewarded with when you do good really makes a difference too. Together it is a full sensory experience.

Pros:
- Control scheme: Kinect really shines here - makes it possible for anyone to dive in and be an instant expert. I haven't even bothered trying it with the standard controller - why would you??
- Music: Energetic, inspiring music that soars when you hit the targets. And you get bonus points for hitting the targets in time to the music!
- Action: My heart rate goes through the roof playing this game
- Storyline: The nutshell story is that you are flying around killing computer viruses. The fun of it is that you are trying to save some hottie, and because she's such a hottie, it makes you happy when you finish the level and get to see her face
- Immersion: This is one of those games that gives you tunnel vision. Your house could burn down around you while you are playing this game and you would not notice, it is that intense.
- Wow factor: When people see you playing this, they want to play too.
- Ease of play: There's a tutorial, but you won't need it. Its that intuitive.

Cons:
- The "mission select" menu is a bit confusing. If you just hit "play", it always plays the first level, not the last level you played, so you have to choose the right level manually each time
- The game would lose tracking of me in front of the Kinect every now and then. Could be my Kinect though
- Unplayable if the Kinect is mounted below about waist height. For some reason, it interprets everything "low"
- Left hand is always rapidfire, right hand always missiles. It'd be nice to be able to switch, since some missions require almost all rapidfire... your left arm will be like Popeye's after playing this for a bit. EDIT - I just realized you can change this in the menus... use either hand, and just clap to change between rapid/missiles. Much better.
- There are no checkpoints or manual saves. If you die, you go all the way back to the beginning of the mission. Can get pretty frustrating if you were just about to finish. This is probably my biggest peeve (which I hope will eventually be addressed), as it tends to be the main reason I walk away from the game.
- Looks like the game is going to be a bit short. Near as I can tell, its only 5-6 levels. I've only had it a few days, but I expect replayability to be high, and plenty of opportunity for DLC from the developers.

All in all, the cons are pretty minor, and like I said, I don't have any regrets. If you have a Kinect and have been looking for a reason to actually start using it, this is it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just the best Kinect game so far but also one of the year's best, June 27, 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 (Video Game)
Simply put, if you own a Kinect, this game needs to be a part of your library.

The game is one of the most imaginative and enjoyable shooters that I have ever had the pleasure of partaking in. Forget playing with a controller, playing with the Kinect is the way to go here. It's an undeniably trippy experience, waving your arms in front of the screen as you destroy all the obstacles and projectiles preventing you from getting to Lumi, the girl you're tasked to save. The best thing is that out of all the Kinect games I've played, this one is the most responsive with the target reticles following your hand gestures with hardly any visible lag time. Selections are made at about double the speed they normally are, taking the Kinect experience and making the interaction between player and sensor a smoother affair.

It's all over too quickly but you won't mind as this game rewards multiple playthroughs by offering plenty of unlockables ranging from art galleries, video filters and other cool features.

Child of Eden is an audio/visual feast. The graphics are spectacular and raise the bar for other shooters as far as I'm concerned. It's the kind of game that looks so great that even people who abhor videogames have no choice but to look on as this game is played. Coupled with the thumping tunes, it's literally a perfect marriage of sight and sound. For this game to be played properly, you have to allow yourself to get lost in the music because maintaining the maximum amount of score multiplier bonuses requires you to fire your homing lasers on the beat. I didn't realize it at first but it wasn't until I figured it out that I suddenly became aware of how interactive this game truly is. Before you even realize it, you'll be moving in time with the music, allowing yourself to be taken over by the rhythm of it all.

If I have any complaints, it's only that playing this game can wear your arms out. I played three stages back to back and by the end of the third one, I literally had to hold my right arm up with the left, much to the entertainment of my wife who was watching me play. The game addresses this by occasionally posting up alerts suggesting a break if you're feeling sore. It's a minor complaint and other than the game being too short, there's very little to find fault with in this game.

Child of Eden is a game that should be experienced by all, especially those with the Kinect. The game is being released later this year for the PS3 but even with PS3 Move support, I just don't see it coming close to the experience that playing Child of Eden really is when it's being played hands free.

Absolutely recommended, especially for those that are familiar with the game Rez, which is the forefather of the Child of Eden experience and also created by Eden's designer, Tetsuya Mizuguchi.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0x9b744ce4)

This product

Child Of Eden - Xbox 360
Child Of Eden - Xbox 360 by UBI Soft (Xbox 360)
$39.99 $16.14
In stock on April 25, 2014
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.