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Children of Athena (The New Pantheons) Paperback – May 17, 2013


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Product Details

  • Series: The New Pantheons
  • Paperback: 522 pages
  • Publisher: Fractal Moon; 1 edition (May 17, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 061581672X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615816722
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,146,630 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Henderson on August 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In James Gurney's "Dinotopia", one of the dinosaurs postulates an interesting point to the narrator. He says "You of the West think of time as a line, moving continually in one direction, while your Eastern brothers think of time as a circle, continually repeating itself. There is truth in both views." For an eternal optimist, truer words cannot be found. The history of humanity is that of a helix--the geometric combination of the line and the circle. Countries and empires rise and fall, rise and fall, endlessly building atop the ruins of the old. What changes is that as history goes along, governments become less corrupt, less willing to sacrifice their own people for their self-preservation while giving nothing in return, and more open-minded.

In "Children of Athena", humanity builds itself upon the moon, overlooking the ruined remains of Earth--a perpetual reminder in itself of the mistakes that they have learned from. They are ruled over by the gods of old--those of the Greco-Roman, Norse, and Shinto pantheons, though in reality these gods are nothing more than figureheads created for the entertainment and guidance of the masses, who are the real rulers through the Anonymous collective. Even Zeus, chief of the gods, answers to Anonymous. All citizens are able to monitor all others, and the economy is based on a karma system, which is governed from side-to-side instead of from above. Humans are required to have devices within them that force them to absorb the feelings of others, known as empathy augs. All are connected through Fog, a network of nanoprobes that creates WiFi, fabricates matter, heals injuries, and so much more. The only neighbors humanity has in the galaxy are the Dragons, who stemmed from Earth's Polynesian population.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By NK on June 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
...of a world where money is of little consequence and influence is based on accomplishment towards the public, not on clever manipulation of those around you.

'Children of Athena' is undoubtedly a book not everyone will enjoy. It deals with darkness as much as it deals with light and the author isn't afraid to spell out things that other books don't even tare to touch on. But that is one thing that makes this book so excellent. There is a blatant disregard for the established 'formula' for success. The author doesn't play things safe, or tries to pander to a specific audience. Instead, we get a no-holds-barred piece that showcases a future for humanity that is at once frightening, but also beautiful.

Most of all, it encourages to think. Think about all those things we hold dear today and how insignificant they may become. Think of how we view the world, society as a whole around us and how society, in turn, thinks of us. Are we giving as much as we are receiving? Are we all we can be?

The plot and the story itself are woven neatly into the conjured up future and, as I am happy to say, refuse to step into the traditional black and white paintings of good and evil. Without wanting to spoil anything, i can only say, that the evil presented in the pages of this book is more terrifying than most I have read about.

Most of all though, I enjoyed how the book made me think, something that not many modern best-sellers even try to do anymore.

A definitive must-read from my point of view.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alexander Crommich on July 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Humanity is scattered throughout the moons of the solar system living in clouds of nanotechnology called the `fog.' The secrets of the human body have been unraveled. The mind can be stored and transported like an mp3 file. Zee Prime, an AI created by humanity that has become our mother, lives in giant rings orbiting the sun.

There's no privacy, and the actions of each man, woman, and child are judged by the race as a whole. Imagine if likes and dislikes on Facebook were the currency you lived by. Every decision made is done through the Anonymous network. Everyone votes, everyone knows. It's the internet made into a physical utopia. And the Cthulu-like forces of entropy, fascism, racism, and sexism want nothing more than the spread despair and accelerate the heat death of the universe. This is the world W.B. Wemyss presents in Children of Athena.

The biggest strengths and weaknesses of this book stem from the fact that it presents an idea more than it tells a story. True, there is a narrative and there are characters, but they're vehicles that allow certain ideas to interact with each other and make their points rather than engaging elements in and of themselves.

Also, at times it's hard to follow the author's train of thought, and there are several threads that don't seem to fully develop by the end of the novel, but the idea itself being presented, a utopia created by limitless technology and the internet made physical reality, is absolutely fascinating. More, it's a world that despite all of its whimsy is utterly believable, and it's a world that I found myself wanting to live in.

The tense the author uses, present third person, might throw you at first, but Wemyss exercises enough restraint to keep it from overwhelming you.
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