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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 20, 2003
This is probobly the 2nd to worst out of the whole 7 movies. It just aint creepy or wierd enough like "COTC 1" and "COTC 4" They have an adult co-leader and child leader that is about 12 or 13. All the rest of the kids are anywhere between 15-17 years old. This movie didnt show any of thier cult meetings and there was just too much gore in this film, which really was boring cause it was the same kids that killed. If you want to see a decent COTC movie with the kids and the gore, you need to get either "COTC 2" or "COTC 4" They have more of the little kids in it killing or doing thier cult stuff. But this movie was just not needed for the series.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HALL OF FAMEon December 25, 2004
No other author in recent memory has had as much consistent success selling books as Stephen King. For roughly three decades the Maine writer churned out book after book, each one selling more and more copies. He's a world unto himself, the lucky fellow! He's so successful that he could throw out his pens, put away his typewriters, bury his word processor six feet under, never write another word in his life, and STILL have enough money to wallpaper the Great Wall of China five times over. In many respects, it's Stephen King's world and the rest of us are just living in it. But, and this is a gigantic but, an enormous number of metaphysically bad films based on his novels threaten to put a serious dent in his legacy. We all know the good ones, the ones that not only scared audiences stiff but also helped propel King's career to even greater heights. "Carrie" is probably the best example, followed by "The Shawshank Redemption" and "The Dead Zone." These are wonderful, magical films that one can watch again and again without wearying of them. Then there are the rest: the truly wretched refuse that reminds one of dental plaque or the junk that washes up on the shores of a filthy river. Welcome to the Children of the Corn franchise.

"Children of the Corn 5: Fields of Terror" is the archetypical low budget horror film instantly recognizable to fans of the genre. Its got a group of young people leaving their urban element to head out into the countryside, a few recognizable actors who once made bigger films but now must scramble for a paycheck, and an up and comer who would move on to better things. Allison (Stacy Galina), Greg (Alexis Arquette), Tyrus (Greg Vaughan), and Kir (Eva Mendez) take a trip to the sticks in order to attend a funeral. Also going along, but in a different car, are Lazlo (Ahmet Zappa) and his girlfriend Charlotte (Angela Jones). Tragedy suddenly erupts when Lazlo and his significant other wander into a cornfield and meet their maker at the hands of a bunch of kids armed with sharp farm implements. The other four kids don't know about this incident, but they do learn about the kids after Greg crashes his car in a ditch. Ezekiel (Adam Wylie) and a few of his cronies emerge from the corn to warn the four about trespassing on private property. They also direct these outsiders to the nearest town and bus stop, but they just miss said bus and must stop into the local tavern where Kane Hodder works as a bartender. After a thoughtless comment to the locals about an unpleasant odor in the air, our group learns that a burning corn silo is to blame. Wanna bet that silo will play a big part in the next hour or so?

In the interim, the group holes up in an abandoned house near town to await the arrival of the bus after discovering someone set fire to their car. Allison takes some time to explain her increasing funk: she heard an offhand comment in the bar about "He Who Walks Behind the Rows," a name that evokes memories of her brother Jacob (Dave Buzzotta). He ran off years ago to join a cult professing to worship this being, and it's no to learn that this very cult resides in the same area where Allison and her pals are now staying. Ezekiel, with the help of understanding adult Luke Enright (David Carradine), directs the ceremonies and sacrifices to "He Who Walks Behind the Rows," who just happens to live in the aforementioned burning silo. Allison reunites with brother Jacob and tries to talk him into leaving. Unfortunately, a book containing the cult god's holy writings fall into the hands of Kir, who reads it and promptly joins the group. Anyone in the cult attaining the age of eighteen must willingly jump into this silo fire so the demon can absorb their spirit, or some such nonsense. Needless to say a lot of people are going to go into that fire, including some local firefighters, a few cult members, and Jimmy Hoffa. Fred Williamson shows up from time to time as the suspicious local sheriff.

So all the elements listed above are here: the group of city kids ran into a rural evil, David Carradine and Fred Williamson showed up to collect their paychecks, and up and comer Eva Mendez put in her time as a snobby looker with a penchant for joining corn cults. All of the characters are appropriately irritating, with special mention going to Alexis Arquette as a mouthy city slicker who doesn't know when to keep his mouth shut. His eventual demise at the hands of enraged cultists is uniquely satisfying and requires that I bump this film up from two to three stars. An added benefit to watching "Children of the Corn 5" is the number of people we see engulfed in flames. When you're going to set up a fiery god living in a corn silo as the centerpiece of your film, you've got to start passing out fire retardant suits to the stuntmen. The scenes where the firemen fall prey to the roaring flames shooting out of the silo transcend the laws of physics. Watch and see if you can figure out why.

The only extras on the disc are trailers for parts three, four, and six of "Children of the Corn," "Halloween: Curse of Michael Myers," "Mimic 2," "Dracula 2000," and "Halloween: H20." This installment in the extraordinarily persistent "Children of the Corn" franchise was the last one I could watch without groaning aloud. It takes a steely constitution to weather the next two entries, let me tell you. Give this one a chance if you like Eva Mendez (what guy wouldn't) or if you simply must see every horror movie you stumble across.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Back to the cornfields with He Who Walks Behind the Rows for another installment of guess with adult's in trouble now. That's right, here's yet another installation in the saga of He Who Preys Upon the Young, this time showcasing the plights of a few rather unfortunate young adults as they wander into the stalking fields. It begins as two cars toting six unwary occupants near a small town where their friend, a victim of an "accidental bungee cord jumping" demise, wanted his ashes to be spread. As these city-dwellers move closer and closer to the prize, however, they blunder into the hands of some rather unfriendly youths looking for some time, and folks they don't seem to appreciate, to kill.
Its strange to say that, in watch the Children of the Corn sequels, I've found very few things captivating and yet I still harrowingly press onward. I'm not certain why that is or what the call the cornfield actually has on a soul, but I know that many of these movies, such as this one, are in the realms of basic bloody entertainment don't reach the pinnacles of enjoyment that I sometimes strive for. There were moments of wonderful brutality in the movie, with many a body (outstretched arm, unwisely placed head) meeting the edge of some very sharp harvesting utensils, and there were a few moments that seemed to have that special something to give a person that had been traveling the rows for a while. Still, as it pressed into the faith matters and the principles that had been secured deep into this viewing mind since the onset of the series, I found my mind impatient and mentally wandering, looking for something akin to a horrific manifestation to make everything all right. This sadly never came, though, and I found myself with only some blundering antics thrown into the midst of some gargantuan fields to keep me company, chasing it all with some very angry, sometimes easy-on-the-eyes (at least in one instance) youthful hostiles on their heels.
If you've pressed this far into the fields and made it through some of the very bad sequels, then this won't be as wretched of a taste as some of the others you've found. You'll find yourself laughing at some of the cheap effects, though, and noting that David Carradine makes a very good chair-bound mouthpiece, plus you should like some of the deaths (even a certain entertaining Zappa appears therein) as they paint the screen with blood. This is why I, for some reason or another, give it a 3.2 on the 5 star list, because I've been worse places and appreciate the offerings made. Still, if you haven't made it this far, I wouldn't suggest taking on such a hefty task of moving this far up the ladder, mostly because the beast inside the silo is bound to disappoint you as much - although the ironies in the ending might make you nod your head and laugh.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Besides a cameo by Fred Williamson, most of the people getting killed in this thing are cute college students. I swear that the main person is Martha Quinn from MTV but that's just because I hope for Martha Quinn to succeed in something if only in B movies.
Nothing all that original in this one, except that the chick that looks like Martha Quinn (but I think she's one of the Arquettes - the one that doesn't make any money) is trying to save her brother from this cult because he's chickening out on his 18th birthday. The rest of the cast gets killed, although the really cute Hispanic girl jumps into the fire because she has come to believe in the tenets of the cult and she's too old to live. She's also in mourning but I really fail to see how easily someone can be brainwashed into killing oneself. Usually it takes months, even years to get someone into a state where they will kill themselves for religion. This woman spends one afternoon thinking about one of the dumb kids said and she's jumping into the fire.
It's not a bad video and I've seen worse horror movies, but there's something anemic about this whole endeavor. Maybe it's just that everyone is TOO good looking, not as good looking as those cute victims in Urban Legend, but still too uniformly cute.
Oh yeah, this one also has not one but TWO of the Zappa brats. Sorry, but Dweezil's not one of them.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 2006
This is the dullest of the CotC films so far, but it's too late for me to turn back now. Much like the last 2 ones, it doesn't seem directly related to the original film, but just another variation on the basic setup. The corn matters again this time, however, and He Who Walks Behind the Rows is back, though this time as a fire in a corn silo, for some reason. For most part nothing really happens. There is a plot, of sorts, involving the main characters brother who joined the Corn Cult and so on, but it's just another basic re-do where a pack of young people stumble into a town full of evil children. They stand around for a long time, eventually some people die, but not in a particularly intriguing fashion. David Carradine makes a brief appearence, and he's passably amusing, but the film hasn't got a whole lot else going for it. Also, the head evil kid isn't very good, as has generally been the case in this series. It's tough to make small children scary or intimidating, I guess. The film does have an amusingly pointless stinger at the end, and once the killin gets started it's sufficiently amusing, but it's mostly a whole lotta nothin.

Grade: D
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 9, 2009
Surprisingly this is Sid's first entry into the Children of the Corn series. Over the years we've seen bits and pieces of these films, but never sat down to watch one through. Our first attempt was a pretty sad one since we caught Children of the Corn 5 on tv and thought why not? It just seems as if there is no change to the premise except gradually making it worse and worse to the point of no return. We happen to be very devout b horror fans and thought it was pretty hilarious, but can understand some thinking it's just terrible.

The film happened to have an all star b cast with Shaft, David Carradine, Alexis Arquette (George from The Wedding Singer, and Eva Mendez's starring in her first flick. Luckily for her (and us) this seemed to have the same effect it did for Jennifer Aniston in Leprechaun spawning a very successful career in actual movies. The premise for our laugh fest happens to start with six college students who wind up getting lost in a deserted town. They come to find this town is plagued by a group of little kids controlled by an murderous evil force. The lead kid is this little redhead, who had to be in some TGIF show long ago, and is simply hilarious. He plays the ultimate evil force standing at 4'5" and is sooooo far from scary. To some this may lead you to dislike the film, for us it added 10x the enjoyment. Despite all the murders the college kids decide to stay around and try to save some of the kids who are under the evils control.

Overall the film was really bad in that good sort of way Sid just can't get enough of. The scene where Shaft and Carradine face off was one of the most memorable for us. Children of the Corn 5 just happens to make it in our favored time of 90's horror by 2 years, and certainly gets the green light from us. Just be clear that we're recommending it to those who enjoy a nice hilarious low budget horror and not to the avid horror fanatic. For the true Children of the Corn followers we'd imagine this one was a real joke.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2003
It goes back and forth in this series. it goes from good(the first) to horrible(2nd) to bad(3) back to good, then down to decent. This movie doesnt follow the series at all. Yeah it involves "he who talks behind the rows." but what too much is changed in this one. For one, There is a adult leader. Yeah he isnt the main leader but still he is one of the leaders in the movie. second, why is it that there are plenty of adults running around through the movie. If i watched the first and 2nd correctly, the whole belief they had was that they needed to get rid of the adults.Yet in this one, there is a whole town full of people. Also, help me understand the point of having a goofy ... looking actor like the one they had to play the main girls b/f. I almost went nuts watching that .... crack stupid jokes and what is with his half goatee. Would anyone out there really decide to kill themselfs just to kill 2 of the kids. Imean come on. he stole the weapons from them and still decided to blow himself up. I will say that it got 3 stars from me cuz the story behind it is original and isnt just lets do the same thing as the first but with more killing and blood (COTC 2). The movie follows a group of college students whose car goes into a ditch and they have to go into town to get help. they miss the bus and decide to stay in some creepy abandoned house and thats when it all starts. And also, if these people are college kids, are we really suppost to believe that the girl that offers herself to the monster is only 18? cuz she said she was. If you like this series then watch this movie cuz it is one to see and keeps ur attention and is fun to watch.Just a warning though. If you are into this series just to see a large number of killings and blood then this one u wont like. There arent too many people killed (maybe 5 or 6) so be ready.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Well, since Part IV was pretty good, I decided to watch Part V, entitled "Fields of Terror". I was suprised to see actors like David Carradine, Eva Mendez, & Alexis Arquette in here.

Well, the whole plot of this movie I am just going to say really fast, so I apologize if this is short, but its pretty much six teens going to a funeral or something like that for a friend, the two are killed immediatly, then the other four last pretty long. They find this farmhouse being run by the cult of kids, but this time they are all controlled by an older man, played by David Carradine.

All of the teens die exept for one, whom is pregnant. After the events of this, she goes on and has the baby, and thats pretty much the sypnosis of the film.

This film was just average, didn't care too much for it, I would've given it 2/5, but something made me give it a 3/5.

IT HAS KANE HODDER! Yes, Jason from four Friday the 13th films, although he only plays a brtender for acouple minutes, it was awesome to see him. It would've really been cool to watch him beat the hell out of the children of the corn.

So I give Children of the Corn 5 3/5. But not eally recommended because I don't think most people would like this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 29, 1999
i'd like to say that this franchise just gets better with each installment, but it's simply not true! the children of the corn series peaked with the fourth one, but went completely to hell with the fifth! i don't know what the makers of this film were trying to do, but whatever it was they failed miserably! perhaps they were trying something new, trying to break away from what had been going on in the first four. haven't you ever heard of the saying, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it"? i just didn't care if any of the "good guys" lived or died, there's just no connection with any of the characters that is necessary. the plot was predictable and the few twists that were put in just came out of no where and seemed to be put in just to take up time. and when did "he who walks behind the rows" become the next david koresh? last i checked, "he who walks behind the rows" was supposed to be a haunting, scary creature, not a laughable psychopath! if you rent this movie, you will be sorely disappointed. get one of the first four, they will suit your needs better!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 12, 2014
After "Children of the Corn IV" I was really excited to jump right into "Fields of Terror". "The Gathering" brought a new style and element to the series, and I was looking forward to seeing where the series would go next. Well any good will or excitement died off pretty quickly as "Fields of Terror" played out.

While we don't have the stellar cast seen in part IV, "Fields of Terror" has a pretty solid line-up with Eva Mendes and David Carradine, toss in Alexis Arquette and Fred Williamson, and that's a realitvely well known group, Unfortuantely, they are all wasted here, given nothing to do.

As the film opens we meet a group of "teenagers?" in two cars traveling the backroads of America on their way to scatter the ashes of a recently departed friend. Eva Mendes tries to be solemn, I think, because she may or may not have had a relationship, it's muddled and the focus on these scenes is more on the wacky antics of the couple in the lead car stopping every now and again to tape blow-up dolls along the road. At one stop while the guy is fussing with his blow-up doll, the girl wanders into the cornfield and gets hacked up, the guy seeing this tries to run and gets hacked up too. Somehow the car carrying the other "teens" is attacked by one of the blow-up dolls and crashes, stranding them all in this small "Nebraska" town, and when did Nebraska get a mountain range or have palm trees? We learn that there is a weird farm run by kids and overseen by an old man who is also wierd, and that they worship a diety known as "He Who Walks Behind the Rows"...and coincidentally, one of the stranded teenagers has a brother that ran away to worship "He Who Walks Behind the Rows".

Stupidity built on cliche on top of poor directions, lousy F/X, wooden performances. This isn't even at "Part 2"'s so bad-it's-fun level of film, this is just a boring slog to get through. I guess if you are dying to see Eva Mendes in her first "major" film role, you can check it out, but honestly there is nothing here to recommend watching this.
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