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Children with a Star: Jewish Youth in Nazi Europe Paperback – September 10, 1993


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Children with a Star: Jewish Youth in Nazi Europe + Salvaged Pages: Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Reprint edition (September 10, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300054475
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300054477
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,458 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Nazis' murder of 1.5 million Jewish children is the focus of this pioneering study. Expelled from school, forced to wear the yellow star, Jewish children in German-occupied Europe had their family lives shattered by anti-Semitic legislation prior to the outbreak of war. Later some hid in attics or forests; others concealed their identities but remained visible, constantly threatened by starvation, disease or selection for the gas chambers. Yet, Yale scholar Dwork demonstrates, Jewish children created their own mental space, where play, love and relationships continued amid the evil and horror. Tapping letters, diaries, drawings and oral histories of survivors, Dwork adds a poignant new dimension to Holocaust studies.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA-- A poignant and gripping story by an author who writes with a heart. Dwork begins her history by reiterating the grim statistic that only 11 percent of European Jewish children survived the war and that over one and a half million children were killed. She documents her narrative by weaving personal recollections of survivors and entries from their diaries. Readers will be transfixed by the children's daily lives--the ordinariness as well as the atrocities. A new dimension in books about the Holocaust. --Mary Quinn, Fairfax County Pub . Lib . , VA
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sabrina Van Goethem on November 8, 2013
Format: Paperback
People who know me personally, know that I have an interest in what happened during WWII, and more specifically the Holocaust. For years, I have been trying to find the psychological explanation behind the genocide. What turned ordinary people like you and me into monsters, capable of committing such crimes?

There are many books about the Holocaust, but almost all of them are geared towards what happened to the adults. Very few books focus on the fate of children. 'Children with a Star' by Deborah Dwork tries to fill that gap.

The book is divided into 7 chapters and each chapter deals with a certain aspect of children's lives. It starts out at the beginning of the war, when new rules such as not being allowed to go to school anymore would have affected the children. Later on, it moves towards transit camps and ghettos, until finally the life of children in slave labor or death camps is told.

The book is also illustrated and the photos provide a face to put to the names mentioned in the book, making it much more personal. When I saw a group picture of children I found myself wondering how many of those happy little faces would still have been alive by the end of the war...

Whilst it's obvious the author did a lot of research for this book, I'm not convinced she got it across to the readers very well. The sections which come from interviews with survivors were very clear, but the parts inbetween were often difficult to read. And with difficult, I don't mean because of the subject of the book. In my opinion, the author often uses a difficult way to tell something which could have been said more easily: sentences are way too long and use too difficult words. I have to admit I had to restrain myself from skipping parts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dudley Ristow on May 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Is the poignant ending to this book on the Holocaust. It is the answer given to the author when she asked the survivors why were they so ready to share their experiences with her. This is totally in contrast to the hearing that was given to survivors when they return from the camps. They were then told - "it is past, let it go we don't want to hear more about it." The book covers the whole spectrum of the Holocaust experience from these childrens' happy idyllic childhood days, persecution in their own home-towns, their going underground, their relocation to the ghettos, on transport to the camps and their shocking experiences there. Particularly poignant is the description of the shock of arriving at Auschwitz-Birkenau - it was an experience out of hell and nothing that their before life had prepared any of them for and how they were forced to discard all human emotions on learning that their loved ones' selection to the left had lead them to gas chambers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Strong willed on October 12, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great read for any person and I highly recommended to anyone who wants to know what exactly happened during the Holocaust. Many of the stories that were told by adults who were just children at the time of the war are very sad. This book was well written and I strongly support the effort for those who suffered through the Holocaust to be given the chance to tell their story, for the truth must be told!
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