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A Child's Introduction to the Night Sky: The Story of the Stars, Planets, and Constellations--and How You Can Find Them in the Sky Hardcover – May 1, 2004


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A Child's Introduction to the Night Sky: The Story of the Stars, Planets, and Constellations--and How You Can Find Them in the Sky + The Everything Kids' Astronomy Book: Blast into outer space with stellar facts, intergalactic trivia, and out-of-this-world puzzles + Educational Insights Nancy B'S Science Club Moonscope And Sky Gazers Activity Journal
Price for all three: $62.91

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 and up
  • Grade Level: 3 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1120L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers; Stk edition (May 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157912366X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579123666
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 10 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (144 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,655 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-6–Supported by a mix of cartoon vignettes, elaborately detailed illustrations of constellations, sky maps, and small but dramatic space photos, this tour of the universe takes readers through the solar system and well beyond–introducing along the way a handful of astronomers, space probes, myths, and principles of physics. Hamilton's informal scenes of dinosaurs watching a giant meteor coming down, stars cast as human figures with exploding heads, and such mirror Driscoll's general tone. Beneath such chapter heads as "Hunks, Chunks, and Flying Objects" or "The Zodiac Zoo," the author notes that "Stars and planets get most of the attention when we're talking about space. But there's lots of other cool stuff up there, too." The author defines special terms in a running "Deep Space Dictionary," and closes with an array of dates, calendars, and current paper or electronic resources. Because all of the information here is easily available elsewhere, and the sheet of glow-in-the-dark stickers and the adjustable star finder tucked into a pocket will be problems in a library setting, this genial, handsomely packaged survey makes an appealing, but secondary, choice.–John Peters, New York Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From the Inside Flap

Since ancient times, people have been looking up and wondering about all of the things that glow in the night sky, and about our place in the big, wide universe. The study of the night sky and all of the objects and forces up there is called astronomy, and A Child's Introduction to the Night Sky is a great introduction to what astronomers have learned (and are still discovering), what astronauts and scientists explore—and what you yourself can find by gazing up into the night sky.

You'll learn about how stars are born; how the planets move through the sky; and just where we are within the big galaxy we call home; the Milky Way. You'll find out about solar and lunar eclipses, the phases of the Moon, and what a comet's tail is made of. You'll delve into mysterious forces (like black holes and dark matter) that are so strange that even scientists don't fully understand them yet.

And when it comes time to find out about the starry constellations, you'll learn their names and shapes, along with their stories—sometimes called myths—that were invented to help explain and identify them.

You'll even learn about rockets, satellites, space stations, and space travel, including some of the exciting plans we have for future missions. When will a person visit Mars? It might be sooner than you think!

Finally, you will find out how to take the handy Star Finder outside with you and find all of your favorite stars, constellations and planets in the sky, just like professional astronomers do. (Wait until you find out how easy it is to spot Venus).

With A Child's Introduction to the Night Sky, the Star Finder inside and the fun glow-in-the-dark stickers you can put on your ceiling, you will be a junior astronomer in no time! --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Michael Driscoll is a reporter for the Martinsburg Journal in West Virginia, and has written for Reuters and the Associated Press. He's a former editor at Black Dog & Leventhal, where he worked on a wide range of titles, including the State Shapes series, Take Me Out to the Ballpark, and Photo Oops. Driscoll studied poetry at Emory University in Atlanta, and has been a poetry afficionado ever since.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 144 customer reviews
Purchased this book to go with a Telescope for Xmas gift.
ILove2Shop
I bought this book for Christmas for my 5 year old granddaughter, and she loves it.
Rick79
I recommend this book for those children who are into the sky.
Irene E. Klein

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
A CHILD'S INTRODUCTION TO THE NIGHT SKY is one of those 'children's books' that should be read by the adults before passing it along! There is much to learn in this colorful, artistic and very informative survey of the stars, making many of the legends behind the constellations and mythologically named configuration of stars easy to visualize and understand. It is bound to provoke questions from the 'child readers', making adult homework or refresher course a must.

Writer Michael Driscoll thankfully does not 'dumb down' his readers but rather stimulates with concise and informed language. After an interesting Welcome to the Universe, he divides the book into sections: What's Up There - both what we can see and what we can't see; and Exploring What's Up There - what astronomers and astronauts do and what the reader can do. He then outlines a brief history of space, maps of the night skies, and adds succinct histories of the mythological characters for whom the star configurations are named.

Accompanying this informative and entertaining take on the night sky is the artwork of Meredith Hamilton that goes beyond illustration into the science of depiction of stars. Included in the book are glow in the dark sticker packs and 'star finders' that, while they may cheapen the book for adults, they probably will please the younger brother and sisters in the family. For an outing of learning about the stars this is a very good beginning - for everyone! Grady Harp, March 06
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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By light october on January 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The subtitle of the book is the Story of the Stars, Planets and Constellations -- and How You Can Find Them in the Sky. It should read The Stars, The Planets, the Astronomers, the Universe and Everything. The books has definitions, factoids, readable text, stories, illustrations, pictures, a star wheel/star finder, stickers and everything that has anything to do with our world and our universe. Not for small children (too much text/ too much information), but the best introduction to astronomy I have seen for middle school and older children presented in a very very approachable/ user friendly format. Well done!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a birthday present for my great nephew. The book comes with stars to put on the ceiling of the room which he just went crazy for. He finds the book challenging as he is in the 1st grade but reads 3rd and this is a 5th grade book. He loves it and it goes really well with his telecope. I recommend this book for those children who are into the sky.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By R. Edwards on April 25, 2007
Format: Hardcover
We purchased this book for my daughter as a reward for a good report card. Her 1st grade class has been learning about space. While the book may seem a little advanced for first graders it is definitely a book that they can used to reference with an adult's help. The book is broken down in and way and written so that the common person without astronomy knowledge can learn from it and transfer that to the child. This book can also be used as a great resource for teachers teaching younger kids about our universe. Included with this book is a glow in the dark star chart that helps anyone find the constellations. This book provides an easy way to have quality time with a child that is also educational. If you are looking for a one stop shopping book about space that a child can used for a while then this is it!
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By woolyPULI on September 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
My 6 year old son had a class project about the night sky, I purchased this book and was blown away by the detail and artwork, the viewing wheel was a great addition to the book used to great effect by young and old. I gave the book to his Teacher and she was so impressed with it that she used it as a teaching resourse and took inspiration for some lessons out of it, if you only buy one book for your child on astronomy let it be this one
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Marynna L. Lindsey-Kerce on February 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Incredibly -- despite the title, this book is not just for children.

By far, it is simply the best available, most thorough introduction to the night sky and to astronomy, for curious people of all ages -- the sort of book that motivates every parent to tramp outside, book in hand, wearing eager smiles -- with or without the children!

Beautiful illustrations decorate and enhance the text. Everything is here: models which make it possible to easily visualize the size relationships of the planets in our solar system, as well as their distribution and the distances between them. The visible planets and major constellations are clearly identified, and helpful hints for finding them are provided. Packed with information that is not easily or readily found elsewhere, and packaged in an engaging format which is easily accessible. You don't even need a telescope to use this book in your own backyard. There are clear explanations of what to look for, what to see with the naked eye, and how to use binoculars and telescopes to get a better view. There are even glow-in-the-dark stickers to use in building your own night-sky model on your own bedroom ceiling or elsewhere. Truly, this is the astronomy book I've been looking for, all these years.

Very highly recommended. Simply delightful!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Young Mensan BookParade on January 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
In the book, "A Child's Introduction to the Night Sky," it teaches about the planets, the solar system, constellations, comets, asteroids, and more. My favorite part is where you learn a sentence that helps you memorize the planets. This will help everyone who reads it to learn the order of the planets.

I think anyone, boys and girls of every age, reading it will learn something about space, and I think a lot of people should read it because it will teach you many things about space and planets that you may not have known.

I do have a few complaints about some of the pictures. First, the picture shown of Venus is blue but mostly I've seen pictures of Venus that are more of a reddish color. Also, Saturn looks a little bit different than what I've always learned, as it looks a bit too colorful. Aside from that, it is a neat book, full of great information and I rate it 4 out of 5 stars.

Review by Young Mensan Mason, age 9

The book, "A Child's Introduction to the Night Sky," is all about space and astronomy with lots of brilliantly colored pictures for kids to see. It teaches about all the different planets, red dwarfs, and the universe.

All different kinds and ages of people, boys and girls, would like this "space adventure" story because it tells a lot about space and stars and the night sky. At least people who like space would like it. At least I like it. I read a book similar to this called, George's Secret Key to the Universe and George's Cosmic Treasure Hunt and they had space facts and pictures every now and then but it was a fiction story where there was a super computer named Cosmos and he could open a door that leads to different planets in the universe.
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