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Chili Nation Paperback – January 5, 1999


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Frequently Bought Together

Chili Nation + Chili Madness: A Passionate Cookbook- More Than 130 New Recipes! 2nd Edition + Chili-Lover's Cook Book: Chili Recipes and Recipes With Chiles (Cookbooks and Restaurant Guides)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Clarkson Potter; 1 edition (January 5, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767902637
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767902632
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #696,559 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

From Chili a la Whistle Stop (Alabama) to Serious Capitol Punishment Chili (District of Columbia) to Code 10 Chili (Wyoming), you'll find every imaginable version of what the authors describe as our "one truly national shared food." There are chilies with beans and without, with meat and without, green chilies, and many variations on the classic "bowl o'red." The Sterns' Roadfood (1976) and other books on American food are well known, and their latest is fun to browse through. For most collections.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Jane and Michael Stern document that every state in the Union has its own approach to chili, the Texas-created national dish. Devotees of the original "bowl of red" may fume in protest that Maryland's shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce lightly rouged with chili powder stretches the definition of chili beyond the breaking point. Michigan's Upper Peninsula stuffs its miners' pasties with chili instead of the traditional meat and rutabaga filling. Washington State spikes its chili with plenty of coffee. Florida crosses chili with Cuban picadillo. Vermont mellows out the bite of chili peppers with maple syrup. And what does Hawaii do? Naturally, it studs its chili with chunks of macadamia nuts. One can read this book as the triumph of spicy cooking across the breadth of America or as a perversion of authentic ethnic cookery. Mark Knoblauch

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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If you enjoy chili, this is a great book to add to your collection.
KLMinMN
One of my favorites is the Cincinnati chili, which has chocolate in it.
Sean P. Logue
Each recipe I've tried has been good, while most have been delicious.
Katherine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By David G. Smith on February 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
So, I got me a dilemma, and here it is. I am a very creative person who occasionally has to find things that a four year old will eat. This is the great book for all my needs. Gotta cook at home? Little four year old yummy, not too spicy extravaganza? American Chop Suey Chili from Maine. Maybe a little Kansas Chili. Want to prove I am an experimental guy....How bout Boilermaker Chili. Want to burn some mouths at a pot luck? Tigua Indian Bowl Of Red.
Again, The Sterns are geniuses. I have had some of my favorite meals, at home or on the road(and gained some of my favorite pounds) because of them. But this book is a cultural geography lesson and a daddies dream in one. I don't see this as being a knockoff or reproduced. I see this as a celebration of the large amount of chili recipes that represent our nation. This is the kind of patriotism I want to celebrate, a diverse and spicy nation....and this book does it from soup(some of the chilis are thin) to nuts(macademia....Hawaiian Chili.)
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Threemoons on March 19, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I admit--I first got this book on a whim to top up an order for Super Saver Shipping. It's now one of my most reached-for cookbooks, and is almost falling apart from use! CAVEAT: Don't buy this book unless you have access to most of the various chilies--fresh, dried, and canned--in the book; using the listed ingredients really DOES make a difference. However, the Internet is a great resource for finding hard-to-find items, and dried chilies stay forever in a bag in the freezer. Also, the contents of an opened can can be frozen in a baggie...having said that, I have won more than one informal pot-luck prize with the gems in this book.
Not all chili has to be watery, or contain starch--many of the recipes are for what I call "Texas-style" recipes--all meat, no beans--which leaves you to choose your own side-dish to temper the heat. This book runs the gamut of recipes from ultra-mild to very hot, vegetarian to carnivore paradise. Almost every single recipe requires only one pot, and can easily be increased for a crowd. For solitary folks, nothing beats a batch of chilie--eat half over a few days and freeze the rest for a great meal when you're in a rush.
Get this one and have fun!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you like chili at all, you'll enjoy this book. It has a chili recipe from each of the 50 states, plus DC. Some are specific recipes from restaurants or diners the authors chanced upon; others are just indicative of regional cooking. If I have one complaint, it's that some of the recipes call for hard-to-find ingredients, but I think they'll be worth seeking out. The recipes have been great so far--I've cooked for friends by asking, "Which state do you want to go to?"
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence W. Prichard on February 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
Chili Nation, by Jane and Michael Stern has all the appearance of being a quickly put together raid of their (presumably) voluminous files.
Some of the recipes have appeared elsewhere, e.g. "Square Meals."
Many of the chilis are good, and some are very good, but their hearts don't seem to be in it.
John and Matt Lewis Thorne's "Serious Pig" has a better, more thought out section on chili.
This is all right, but just all right.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
I bought this book on a whim about a year ago, and simply love it. Its both a cultural adventure and a delicious trek accross America. If you are a chili purist, you might have trouble with some of the recipes. If you just like tastey food, you'll love the variety of recipes paying homage to what is arguably our nation's favorite food. The cultural anecdotes preceding the recipes for each state and the District of Columbia are interesting and lend insight into why the ingredients for the recipes were selected. They are fun, easy to make recipes that your family will truly enjoy.
We particularly love the Whistle Stop Chili from Alabama, the Arizona version featuring pork, and the Nebraska Chili Mac and Cheese.
I think you will enjoy this trip across America as much as we did.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you like chili, then this book is for you! I was amazed at the variety of recipies. You are sure to find several that you like since they differ greatly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
One of my culinary quests in life is for the ultimate bowl of chili. Just when I think I've found it, someone comes up with a new idea to create another savory and spicy chili recipe. This book is full of recipes like that, and they often contain ingredients reflecting the local cuisine or some aspect of the local food culture. For example, the Hawaii recipe contains macadamia nuts, the Vermont recipe has maple syrup in it, and the Wasthington state one is spiked with coffee (appropos of Starbucks), and the Pennsylvania recipe has unsweetened cocoa powder.
The recipes also very quite a bit; most contain meat, but some are totally vegetarian, and some don't even have beans. There are red chilis, green chilis, spicy and not so spicy recipes, and the meats include beef, pork, sausage, chicken, lamb, shrimp, and veal. Some of the recipes stretch the definition of chili to the breaking point or perhaps beyond, such as the Maryland recipe that calls for shrimp and crabmeat in a cream sauce with a little chili powder. But whether this counts as true chili or not, I found the ingenuity and creativity of many of the state's recipes a delight and an interesting theme around which to build a cookbook about chili.
If you're into variety as well as spicy food, you'll probably enjoy trying out all the recipes here. The ones that don't have a locally famous ingredient often come from a restaurant the Sterns ate in that had a recipe that they liked. The authors also include a lot of information on chili history and trivia and a mail-order list of places to get spices and chilis. And last but not least, the Sterns also include a few side-dish recipes, such as coleslaw, jalapeno cornbread, corn pudding, and a three-bean salad.
Overall a witty, well-written, and interesting cookbook on a great American dish, and with some nice, extra features thrown in for good measure.
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