Chinese Classical Music

January 1, 2006 | Format: MP3

$17.98
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
8:04
30
2
5:24
30
3
4:27
30
4
8:03
30
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5:58
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5:29
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7
4:58
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8:07
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3:20
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7:26
Disc 2
30
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6:48
30
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6:41
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5:23
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6:22
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4:07
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3:52
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5:14
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2:27
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9
5:41
30
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3:43
30
11
8:49
30
12
6:49
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1999
  • Release Date: January 1, 2006
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: China Record Corporation
  • Copyright: 2006 CRC Jianian, Inc.
  • Total Length: 2:07:12
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QZUYTG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #193,421 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
78%
4 star
22%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 9 customer reviews
Great notes too.
Gerry Scott-Moore
The music is excellently performed, very interesting, and sometimes it's simply beautiful even to a western ears.
Simon
Glad I made the purchase.
James J. Nelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 4, 1999
Format: Audio CD
These four CDs survey the best of Chinese traditional music, focusing on the four types of instruments: plucked instruments, bowed instruments, wind instruments, and percussion. The variety and range keeps this set from ever getting dull, and the music touches every conceivable emotion. This is a set to be experienced. My only regret is that there aren't more volumes in the series. If you are hesitant about this sounding like Chinese restaurant music, don't worry. This seems to be the genuine article, not influenced by Western music or muzak. Some of the instrumentalists on these CDs take your breath away with their technical proficiency and power. If you think you'd like to try some authentic Chinese music, this may be the only set you'll ever need.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Gerry Scott-Moore on February 25, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The man who put this together, Aik Yew-goh, did it with very older artisans that were directly of the Chinese traditional music prior to the 1911 revolution. He is a musician as well as an engineer and producer and used exceptional equipment to record these master recordings, traveling all across China carrying tons of equipment with the intent of documenting it's breadth. He succeeded.

As others indicate this is amazingly accessible to Western ears, because of it's cross-cultural qualities of obvious skill and musical scope. Great notes too. If there were a to be a single collection of Chinese music for the novice it would be this one. They slipped out of print and now apparently are back. One can only hope more offerings from the Hugo label will see the light of day.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Y.P. on May 8, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is an impressive collection, produced by Hugo Production based in Hong Kong. Included in the cloth-bound box are 4 CDs, divided according to the emphasis of instruments involved.

CD1: Hugo Masters 1: Bowed Strings
CD2: Hugo Masters 2: Plucked Strings
CD3: Hugo Masters 3: Wind Instruments
CD4: Hugo Masters 4: Percussion

Although it wasn't explicitly advertised as such, it is clear that this box-set is meant to serve as an introduction to the Chinese music for the "Westerners" and is designed with this in mind. The selection of music includes some of the traditional/classical pieces and folk music arrangements, as well as some newly composed, under healthy dosage of Western influence. The performances here are, as far as I can tell, uniformly good, with gorgeous recorded sound to match. The lucidly-written liner notes by Patricia Bryers can serve as an excellent starting point to explore the Chinese music. One obvious drawback of the notes, however, is her choice of using the "traditional Roman" spelling in translating the Chinese musical instruments and terminology. The non-Chinese speaking (or even Chinese-speaking) listeners might have great difficulty finding further information in the library or web search using her translation.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Greenlight on January 8, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Well, this review will just be to register another vote of confidence, based on a lot of personal listening time with the Hugo catalogue, which I had the opportunity to look back into recently. It's the better part of two decades now, after stumbling onto the early Hugo releases while living in China. I don't speak as a newcomer to these now better known recordings.

A number of the early Hugo discs (particularly the abandoned Lotus imprint) are no longer available anywhere in the world, so they are certainly worth finding. Don't worry too much, of course, as there have been reissues (even acquisitions of performances from before Hugo Aik's days). But the reissues haven't been entirely regular ones, and a fair number of the Hugo recordings are likely to languish (again, until they're forgotten) simply because there isn't the spare operating cash for a reissue by a small label.

Aik Yew-Goh's recordings for at least a decade served as the lone fertile oasis for traditional musicianship in a slapdash mainland Chinese marketplace. At that point in the mainland music biz, the mindset was 'karaoke ... or else.' There were a few good 'approved' state-label pressings of some national troupes. (I take that back about 'pressings': 95% were actually flimsy cassette manufactures at the time.) And then, here and there, in tiny, tucked away alley shops, you might happen upon a single disc from this wonderful label. Somehow it found its way up as an import (at the time) from Hong Kong. And it generally would sit on the shelf, too expensive, and moreover pointless to almost any buyer, since CD players were still an unaffordable luxury. No one paid them any mind at all in the mainland record stalls.
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