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Chinese Cookery Secrets: How to Cook Chinese Restaurant Food at Home Paperback – April 1, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0716020684 ISBN-10: 0716020688 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Elliot Right Way Books; 2nd edition (April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0716020688
  • ISBN-13: 978-0716020684
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,370,362 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Deh-Ta Hsiung was born in 1933 in Peking (Beijing) and educated amongst other places at University College, Oxford, and the Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London. His career has included the following: food and wine consultant to Chinese restaurants in the UK, Hong Kong and India; teacher of Chinese cooking regularly around the world (including France, Ireland, Finland, India and at Ken Lo's Chinese Cookery School in London); Chinese restaurant inspector for a prestigious guidebook and for several major food manufacturers. He is also the author of numerous books on Chinese cooking, including two he co-authored with Ken Lo. But his accolade must be as special Guest Chef at the Savoy, London, for their staff on several occasions. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
At last, here are recipes for some of our favorite dishes from every-day, non-gourmet Chinese restaurants! Among these are Lemon Chicken, Chicken Chow Mein, Sweet & Sour Pork, Kung-Pao Chicken, Twice-cooked Pork, and Hot & Sour Soup. You won't find every dish on your favorite restaurant's menu, but there are several good mainstays. On the down side, there are also some recipes for items I've never seen in a Chinese restaurant, like squid and lamb dishes. Also, in a few recipes, the measurements are difficult to translate, like "1/3 pint of chicken stock (200 ml)"...how much is that in cups? But most recipes are fairly simple and easy to follow. Overall the book is very thorough, covering specialty Chinese ingredients, cooking equipment & methods, and even authentic Chinese serving and drinking customs. I bought the book hoping to be able to re-create my favorite Chinese take-out dishes at home, and there are enough recipes for these that I am satisfied.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By M Brooke Helman on August 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is an essential book - don't let the unknown author and the low price fool you.
This book is the only book I've found to have the proper marinades. That is a good part of the battle of Chinese cooking.
The book also contains the correct cutting instructions.
If you are just starting out, or an advanced Chinese cook, you need this book on your shelf. The recipes are reliable and consistent. The technique that this teaches you is just as indispensible as La Methode!
My only regret is that the publisher cheaped out on illustrations - a few good colour plates would be a welcome addition.
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29 of 37 people found the following review helpful By S. Young VINE VOICE on October 12, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been looking for a cookbook on american chinese restaurant cooking. I had thought this was the one. It's not. HOWEVER, if you tweak the recipes a bit you can get good results.

Their chow mein is made with pan fried noodles, which would make it a lo mein. Their sweet and sour is immensely more sour than sweet. My brother who can handle just about anything didn't like it. And there were only about ten recipes out of at least seventy that were truly something as a main entree in an american chinese restaurant, but they weren't exact.

The good side of this book; it teaches the basic format of how to cook chinese correctly, so you can go through any recipe you find else where and change it to fit. There's a seasoned oil, a basic stock, an egg/flour batter for deep frying and how to marinate meat correctly. These make a big difference in the flavor of what you get.

It's worth it to learn how to cook correctly. But don't trust the ingredients if you're use to the chinese restaurant that serves bright red sweet and sour and chow mein that has more vegetables than meat.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Edward J. Vasicek on July 5, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book does describe how Chinese food is made in many of America's restaurants. Unfortunately, making food this way AT HOME could be an ordeal unless one wishes to cook Chinese food day after day.

Nonetheless, there are many bits of information that can be easily applied at home to make our attempts MORE like what we find in Chinese restaurants. Many of the recipes included are not the typical dishes found in Chinese buffet restaurants (at least in my region of the country), but some are,including twice-cooked pork and chicken with bamboo shoots and mushrooms. I would suggest using this book as a methodology and basics primer. You can then take other recipes, use the methodology, and add the ingredients almost always present in the recipes of this book (rice wine and the unique oriental soup stock, for example). Or, in other instances, you can almost guess the ingredients based on the patterns here!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nader Alnajjar on April 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful book. It has lots of details and very easy to follow. There may be a need to tweek some receipes to suit your pallate. I have read this book time and again and written personally to to thank the author. He was kind enough to respond. Indeed a lovely book !! I just wish it had the photo of each receipe. But what more can we expect from such a low priced book. Congratulations to Deh.

Nader Alnajjar
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