Customer Reviews


29 Reviews
5 star:
 (21)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I want the entire collection!
I LOVE the wei-chuan series of cookbooks. They are billingual and in my opinion the best Chinese cookbooks! I collect cookbooks and have american printed Chinese cookbooks from the 1970's to the present. Even the ones written by Chinese are adapted to suit the American palate in most cases. These cookbooks are terrific though! The recipes are all very close to my auntie's...
Published on January 4, 2003 by Candace A. Gee

versus
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not bad if you're new to dim sum cooking
the recipes in this book are quite accurate, although most fall into two categories - dumplings and buns. a very good beginner's book, if all you want to do is make some pork buns or shui mai, and for the price, it gives excellent recipes for most of the basics.
Published on December 27, 1999


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I want the entire collection!, January 4, 2003
By 
Candace A. Gee "dilettante" (Houston, TX United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
I LOVE the wei-chuan series of cookbooks. They are billingual and in my opinion the best Chinese cookbooks! I collect cookbooks and have american printed Chinese cookbooks from the 1970's to the present. Even the ones written by Chinese are adapted to suit the American palate in most cases. These cookbooks are terrific though! The recipes are all very close to my auntie's and grandmother's recipes and techniques. I love the photos guiding you through difficult steps. In this book- you'll find all the goodies you get in chinatown. i've tried out a lot of the recipes and they TASTE like the ones in chinatown! (uh- that would be a good thing!) I love the variety in this book; buns savory and sweet, moon cakes, egg tarts (dontots- the best thing in the world straight out of the oven!), dim sum- shui mai- har gao (that shrimp dumpling that everyone always orders) , jung taes- the Chinese burrito, sesame balls (I've burned my both of my hands entirely with hot oil- trying to make these puff so be CAREFUL!), you tiau those sticks of greasy bread that my mom refers to as a chinese donut for some reason, those gorgeous pastry flowers that look impossible to make but are surprisingly simple... okay this is just an amazing book and you will amaze yourself when you make your first snack. (so what if it looks completely different from the picture- the taste is still the same!!!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All the favorite comfort foods of Chinese cuisine!, July 25, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
This is one of my most cherished cookbooks! Just leafing through and seeing all the glorious photographs sets my mouth watering and inspires me to cook up one of these wonderful comfort foods, many of which I grew up with. The number and variety of Chinese snacks presented here is astounding, and the recipes are so absolutely authentic and well-tested, you cannot go wrong. Everything I have made has been utterly delectable.
The recipe selection is amazingly comprehensive. Included, of course, are the myriad varieties of buns and dumplings served at Cantonese dim sum or sold at Chinese bakeries in Chinatown. But the recipes go beyond that to present the whole gamut of comfort foods traditionally eaten at meals and as snacks in various regions of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Included are the famous eight-treasure rice pudding and other molded puddings; Beijing-style crullers and sesame flatbreads eaten dunked in soy milk; steamed wheat-flour cakes and rice-flour cakes; deep-fried wheat-flour and rice-flour fritters and dumplings; baked, filled pies and turnovers, both savory and sweet; the famous won ton soup and other savory soups; sweet soups of rice dumplings, beans, taro, tapioca, almonds, etc., served hot or cold; varieties of egg rolls and bean-curd rolls; different regional varieties of moon cakes; steamed bread puddings; steamed bamboo-leaf-wrapped packages of savory meat, vegetables, and rice; the famed egg tarts and coconut tarts; cookies traditionally made for festivals and celebrations. . . . I could go on and on.
In short, this cookbook is simply the best collection of favorite comfort foods out there and well worth owning!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great recipe selection, wish there was a video, May 10, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
A fantastic selection of sweet and savory recipes and easily my favorite new cookbook.
Ingredients are generally easy to find and the author's instructions are clear, except when the process is inherently complex (e.g., pleating dumplings), but this has more to do with aesthetics than the success of the recipes. I've made several of the steamed dumplings and a few of the deep fried recipes with great success. The nice thing about having solid recipes such as these is that you can then experiment with whatever is in the fridge, e.g., making shau mai using fresh corn instead of wonton wrappers.
The book cover is coated in thick plastic for easy cleanup, the large pictures show how the dish should look, and the smaller pictures along the book's spine are helpful, although I wish there was a video that showed the entire process.
I actually bought this book for just one recipe: xiao loong bao (translated as "Little Juicy Steamed Buns" in the book), which burst with broth in your mouth and are especially nice with chinkiang vinegar. The problem is that for a klutz like me, perfectly pleating 1" dumplings is no easy task (if you want to see this done by a master, watch the title sequence of the film "Eat Drink Man Woman").
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even if you're not Chinese, this is a great Dim Sum guide, June 5, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
A Chinese friend recommended this book and the Chinese Cuisine companion. We have tried a number of the recipes and they come out tasting just like a good Dim Sum "snack" in San Francisco.
The recipes are especially well organized: the sets of ingredients are grouped and numbered, so it is easy to follow them. Good color pictures show exactly what you would see on a Dim Sum cart, so you don't have to know the name for sure. Every cookbook should be this well designed!
The text is in both English and Chinese.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, if time-consuming, food!, September 18, 2002
By 
Diane E. Lowe (Los Angeles, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
Many of the snacks in here are simply delicious and the recipes include large full-color photo of the results as well as photos of any complex procedure. The instructions are clear and in both Chinese and English. The only down-fall is that many recipes are very time-consuming or include ingredients that aren't found in a regular supermarket. Also a few recipes in here could be considered full-fledged main dish items, which is not bad, but could be confusing because of the title.
All of the recipes are authentic and incredibly fantastic. I would recommend this book to anyone who wishes to start cooking authentic Chinese food.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful cookbook, July 24, 2002
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
This is a wonderful cookbook. It has easy to follow instructions and wonderful photos. I have tried to make most of the snacks and they all turned out great. It is nice to make those snacks, but it certainly needs a lot of your time. My husband first tried the sunshine cakes and some other cookies and after that, he kept on asking when I am going to make more of those "yummy cookies." It certainly is nice to see his happy face when he sees me making cookies. All in all, this is a must buy!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I like all the Wei-Chuan books, September 11, 2010
By 
C. J. Thompson "Arctic John" (Pond Inlet, Nunavut Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
The Wei-Chuan Publishing Company (apparently connected with the Taiwanese Wei-Chuan Cooking School), has produced a good number of Cookbooks, mostly dealing with Chinese cookery but also coveing other Asian cuisines as well. I own over a dozen of these now and I like all of them. More importantly, I like all of these books for tmuch he same reasons and, accordingly, I have decided to do a general review that applies to each of them and then provide a few individualized comments where appropriate.

Basically, the Wei-Chuan publications are authored/editored by several different persons but the format is largely the same. Each book is divided into logical sections (Meats, Vegetables, Appetizers, etc.) and nearly every recipe is accompanied by a good photograph of the result with some recipes having additional pictures of the preparation as well. This feature alone makes these books well worth the purchase. Another feature of this cuilinary series is that the books are written in China and, at least as far as the books on Chinese cuisine is concerned, the reader need have no issues with 'authenticity'. I personally also like the fact that all of the books are written in Chinese characters and then translated into English. This has has an added bonus of occasionally providing some unintentional amusement due to a particularly 'unfortunate' translation but I specially like it as I am teaching myself Mandarin and these books are excellent learning tools. I often take one on the plane with me when I travel (along with dictionaries) and can spend hours happily translating passages. It is amazing how often the actual translation of a recipe title bears little resemblance to the English title provided.

Finally, I have to say that the recipes in all of these books are interesting and he ones that I have tried to reproduce have worked out well. Mainly though, I just like reading through these books for inspiration and enjoyment. The money I have spent has been repaid many times over.

The We-Chuan books I currently own are as follows:

Chinese Cuisine - Very good introductory section. Recipes range from simple everyday dishes to exotic banquet style delicacies.
Chinese Dim Sum: Wel-Chuan Cultural and Educational Foundation - Great 'step-by-step' pictures for many recipes. Bit too much emphasis on sweet rather than savoury for my personal taste.
Chinese Snacks - More of the same as in the Dim Sum book. No 'step-by-step' pictures but I actually like this book better.
Chinese Appetizers and Garnishes - I haven't attempted much from this book but I am thankful for the great 'step-by-step' pictures provided.

Favorite Home Dishes Chinese Cooking - As the name suggests, most of the recipes are simple and, thus, easy to prepare.

Chinese Cuisine Beijing Style - Lots of Imperial Banquet dishes and many exotic foreign influenced meals that have been 'Chinesified'.
Chinese Cuisine: Cantonese Style - 75 Cantonese recipes. Good recipes with nice pictures but a sparse introduction.
Chinese Cuisine Shanghai Style - Typically good Wei-Chuan quality but probably my least favorite of the 'regional' Chinese cookbooks.
Chinese Cuisine-Taiwanese Style - Excellent Book. Some truly unique recipes I have never seen elsewhere. I love to browse this volume.
Chinese Cuisine: Szechuan Style - I love Szechuan food especially but I would still treat this book as a favorite anyway.

Indian Cuisine - A nice book but be aware that the recipes Indian dishes for the Chinese palate, not Indian.
Vietnamese Cuisine - Great recipes.
Japanese Cuisine - Nearly as good as many books I have that are written by Japanese chefs.
Korean Cuisine - My favorite of the We-Chuan non-Chinese cookbooks so far,
Singaporean, Malaysian & Indonesian Cuisine - My least favorite Wei-Chuan book so far. Somewhat interesting but I don't look at it much.

Finally, I have a new Wei-Chuan book on order and will continue to buy from time to time. I will review separately as I read these new books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For when I'm feeling ambitious..., August 19, 2009
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
I basically got this and a few other Chinese cookbooks from my parents when I moved out. I am half Taiwanese and love Chinese food, especially snacks and street food. Where I live now, I can get Cantonese dim sum, but not any other kinds of snacks and so once in a while, when I've got a full day, I will go through this book and make one of the recipes that I miss most. I am not exagerating when I say that it usually takes a full half day or day to make some of these. It's especially tough when I make some dessert and then realize at the end of the day that despite a full day in the kitchen, I still need to cook dinner. Don't bother buying this book if you never spend more than half an hour in the kitchen at a time.

I do really love the recipes. There are shortcuts if you can buy pre-made wrappers (ex: wonton). And many of the snack are freezable so you can make a whole bunch for future eating pleasure! ex: shu-mai, leek turnovers, dumplings... Note some are not as freezable, ex: yeast dough used for pork buns and red-bean paste buns.

I am not completely unfamiliar with Chinese cooking techniques so the recipes are easy for me to follow - the diagrams and simple pictures are sufficient for me. I do understand that it could be challenging if someone has no idea how what they're making is supposed to look like. Also, it does use ingredients, such as lard, that are not always found in US supermarkets.
I recommend this book for the home cook who either cannot get great Chinese snacks at the store or loves to cook and who once in a while has a day to devote to cooking.

My last point is about the Wei Chuan collection. I have this one and 2 on rice dishes. I like the way these books are organized and am thinking about buying one of the more general books, such as the one one Chinese Cuisine or Chinese Cooking for Beginners. Much of Chinese cooking (from observing my mother, grandmother and aunt) seems to be about tasting the food as you cook and eyeballing the amounts to put into the dishes. While the snack dishes require strict recipes, the other books were good for me to get an idea of the right ingredients to incorporate and approximate proportions. I'd love to know more about how others use the books, and which ones they like most.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent dim sum book for Chinese or Americans, July 3, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
This is very good book for cooking Dim Sum or other Chinese snacks. The instructions are clear and accurate. I have tried quite a few of the recipes and they all turned out very decent; although the preparation is time-consuming.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Snack Recipes!, July 16, 2001
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) (Paperback)
I found the recipe for Lotus bulbs just like I was looking for. I had them in China and they were delicious! I'm trying all the other snacks too. It's great to be eating snacks that are good for you. I can even make my own steamed buns instead of buying them frozen! I even found some recipes that didn't look too good in the picture but I tried them and they were great! If you want to make healthy snacks this is the book for you!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu)
Chinese Snacks (Wei Quan Shi Pu) by Shuhui Huang (Paperback - September 1, 1985)
Used & New from: $6.15
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.