Chopin: Etudes Opp.10 & 25

March 11, 1985 | Format: MP3

$11.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
1:57
30
2
1:26
30
3
3:42
30
4
2:01
30
5
1:38
30
6
3:10
30
7
1:30
30
8
2:20
30
9
2:06
30
10
2:03
30
11
2:16
30
12
2:40
30
13
2:21
30
14
1:26
30
15
1:51
30
16
1:42
30
17
2:54
30
18
2:03
30
19
4:51
30
20
1:06
30
21
0:56
30
22
3:56
30
23
3:33
30
24
2:31

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 9, 1985
  • Release Date: January 9, 1985
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • Copyright: (C) 1984 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 55:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000V6Q930
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,415 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is one of my favorite CDs that I own!
Zoe Harbour
One of the distinct qualities of Pollini that separates him from the rest of the crowd is COMPOSURE.
pianoman
Maurizio Pollini's musical vision is unique.
Chip Hartranft

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Chip Hartranft on February 2, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Maurizio Pollini's musical vision is unique. There has simply never been a pianist as direct, or playing as lucid, in the entire history of the instrument. Nor has there ever been an artist so averse to generic expressivity of any kind. In nearly ever piece he undertakes to play, Pollini manages to distill every phrase, to reduce things to their essentials. While his utter lack of sentimentality has attracted critical barbs over the years - he is purported to be 'cold', 'mechanical' , 'intellectual' (horrors!) - it actually arises from the deepest kind of spiritual engagement. Pollini is able to achieve this depth of engagement in part because of the extraordinary freedom his memory and technical facility permit.
Pollini's recording of the Chopin Études is legendary, and with good reason. I imagine that Chopin, much as he envied Liszt, would have simply been astonished by the masculine energies, the sheer majesty Pollini summons from these pieces. Without calling the least attention to himself, Pollini creates a sound world so compelling that no listener can go away unmoved. That his austerity, intensity, and refusal ever to swoon has moved some listeners to think they hear a lack of musicality is not surprising, but it says much more about those listeners than about Pollini! My advice: disregard them, dive into these performances, and discover a Chopin like no other.
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156 of 181 people found the following review helpful By Wayne A. VINE VOICE on November 14, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I'd imagine that anyone serious about the solo piano repertoires owns several recordings of these Etudes and probably has given Mr. Pollini's at least a spin. If you're new to this, Pollini has a substantial reputation as a pianist and many of his other recordings have garnered praise. Judging from the hubbub here with these reviews you'll quickly learn that there are two teams battling around this composer, and they tend to represent emotion versus intellect. This is a tough issue with Chopin as the composer himself gave indications he wanted to be considered a "classical" (that's "intellectual" but even that's questionable) composer. Some of this music, played "classically" may have struck his contemporaries as romantic nontheless. It's all discussions about angels dancing on heads of pins.

Some think Pollini's approach is too intellectual, meaning he downplays the schmaltz...perhaps, I'm never sure. OK, these are not the dreamiest performances maybe--I wouldn't use them for a hot-tub seduction--but they're really spectacular anyway; his technique is incredible. The first Etude that one reviewer here hated took my breathe away with its precision and dramatic sweep. The rest of the disc is great. I think anyone new to this music would be very happy with this disc.

What's bugging me these days about what we're doing here, and why I think I'll bag out of doing it anymore, is that, well, on one hand we've got Pollini, a world-renowned pianist who is known for his interpretive thoughfulness and Frederic Chopin who seems to be widely regarded as a composer of top notch music.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By T. Cheng on November 4, 2005
Format: Audio CD
In reading these various reviews, let's say that everyone has their own opinion. However, wheter one sees Pollini's Chopin as cold and indifferent (someone calls him a "calculator") or as one of the greats of this generation, I simply invite you to listen. I will give you a specific, towards the end of the powerful Etude nos 12 op.10, starting at the 2'12" mark, listen to the way Pollini handles the left hand arpeggios, the accompaniment. With anyone else, this is just that, but with Pollini, this becomes- for me- a meditative, masterpiece of stillness, juxtaposed with the thunder that flashes at at 2'30". No one else plays it like this.
Another aspect of Pollini's unique style of interpretation can be heard in the nos7 op.25, the greatest of the Etudes. This is usually played as an overtly Romantic, love-sick tune, done to the point of smaltz. Pollini plays the notes as Chopin writes them. No more, no less.
Is Romantic music such as Chopin's to be interpreted from performer to performer, from generation to generation as the reviewer below says? I think not. If Chopin wanted something to be played with extra sadness or expression, he would have indicated so. George Sand documentated famously how Frederick would tear his hair out getting a single bar of music just right, taking days behind a closed door. A single bar!! The great composers were aboslutely meticulous in their dynamic markings, they knew what they were doing... let's hear the music as they meant them to be heard.
This is one of the greatest Chopin recordings in the repertoire.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By pianoman on November 28, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Since many people read these reviews as a source for deciding what to purchase (or not to purchase) I will start off by emphatically expressing that this one of the best piano performances/CDs of all time (and in the history of the piano most likely). There are not enough superlatives in the English vocabulary to describe this performance which is tantamount to elevating an earthly piano to the high heavens.

Etude = An instrumental piece, usually of some difficulty and most often for a stringed keyboard instrument, designed primarily to exploit and perfect a chosen facet of performing. (Groves)
Ok so Chopin's etudes are not exactly Czerny but they are still etudes!

The etudes, in my opinion, belong to a certain subset of pieces that stretch the limits of the piano, specifically, and the art of pianism, in general. This subset does not necessarily have to be defined, but Liszt and Rachmaninof also fall under this category.

One of the distinct qualities of Pollini that separates him from the rest of the crowd is COMPOSURE. Pollini has the ability to nullify all the human tendencies/temptations that are destructive to the cause of pure music (fear of mistakes, inability to sustain tempo, the legitimate tensing of the hand after technically difficult passages, uneven pedalling, swallowing notes, etc....) Pollini plays the 24 Etudes with practically no mistakes (if one listens closely the only intermittent mistakes are extremely trivial to nonexistent - taking a nanosecond here and there to breathe).
The Chopin etudes are some of the most feared pieces in the piano world. Not for nothing we don't have a complete strong recording of Rubinstein playing these.
Pollini presents a majestic, Olympian and masculine version of these pieces.
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