Customer Reviews


34 Reviews
5 star:
 (18)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saint Jack's Passion: the Gospels as literature
By Miles' own admission, his approach is strictly literary and he has even coined the term "theography" to more properly describe his approach. Miles attempted in his first book to view the character of God in the Tanakh (the Jewish version of the Old Testament, which is in a different order than in the Bible that Christians use) as one would view a character in any...
Published on November 25, 2003 by Eric J. David

versus
36 of 50 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Captivating ... for about 150 pages. After that... overdone
I suppose that readers who finished Miles' prior book, "God: A Biography" will be equally captivated by this new title - a sequel of sorts. But if this is your first exposure to Miles' "literary God" you might find, as I did, that your interest waxes, but quickly wanes.
The unusual approach he takes to his rather unique protagonist is really fascinating at first,...
Published on March 10, 2002 by Daryl Anderson


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saint Jack's Passion: the Gospels as literature, November 25, 2003
This review is from: Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God (Paperback)
By Miles' own admission, his approach is strictly literary and he has even coined the term "theography" to more properly describe his approach. Miles attempted in his first book to view the character of God in the Tanakh (the Jewish version of the Old Testament, which is in a different order than in the Bible that Christians use) as one would view a character in any literary work. God goes through doubt, conflict, remorse, even depression in Miles' reading of the Jewish scriptures, ending in an uneasy peace and a centuries-long silence. It is almost as if God is trying to figure out what the hell he's going to do next.
In the "sequel," Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God, God breaks his silence. God had promised his chosen nation, Israel, that he would return them to their homeland out of exile and demolish their enemies with glorious military victory. This was the currency of the day for gods, and Jehovah was not one to be one-upped. However, the crisis in the title deals with the fact that God does not keep his promise. Being the creator of the universe, one does not suspect that he can not keep it, so the only other option is that he chooses not to. Indeed, a Nazi-equivalent holocaust will soon strike his people and his nation. God not only will go back on his promise--he will do so in spades. But why? The answer to this question is to be found in reading the whole book, and a synopsis cannot do it justice, but in a phrase: he has thought of a better way.
God comes to earth, in the form of a baby, turning his sublime Self into the ridiculous humiliation of an infant being born with all that blood and pain, entering the world to the smell of manger droppings -- the Lord of Hosts, completely dependent on the world just to stay alive. And it is just that dependence that is the point God (and Miles) is trying to make. God doesn't just want to kick military butt for his people, he wants to win a greater victory--he wants to conquer Satan, which means he wants to conquer pain, sorrow, shame and, ultimately, death itself. God wants to identify with his people by becoming a person. And not only that, he wants to suffer the most horrific, humiliating death imaginable so that he can relate to all of his children, not just Israel.
Miles does Christians an immense favor by starting his book with the reminder that the Crucifixion is supposed to be one of the most disgusting scenes imaginable. While it has been sanitized in most popular religious artwork (even to the point of calling the day we commemorate it "Good" Friday), the truth of the matter is that God is butchered like a lamb who, unlike a lamb, walks into his death with full knowledge of what is happening to him. The French subtitle of the work is "The Suicide of the Son of God" drawing attention to what some recent French theologians in an Appendix call Suicide Theology. The purpose again is to shock, not for the sake of shocking, but to re-create what the disciples must have been going through to see their God going through the death of a criminal.
Speaking of the Jews of the time, much attention is given these days to what is called "the Historical Jesus." While much of this scholarship and research may be valuable, the more and more we try to track this misty figure down, the more diminishing seem the returns. One wonders what the actual effect would be if we were to have a documentary of the life of Christ filmed in living Technicolor. Would it increase our faith? Or would it disappoint? The reactionary reaction to the radical re-thinking of Jesus of History is to focus on the Christ of faith. Whereas conjecture and history are the guides of the former, the church and tradition are the guides of the latter. Doctrine and dogma, rule and questions are eschewed in exchange for the comfort of faith. This is the Christianity that most people are familiar with, yet, as Jaroslav Pelikan in Jesus Through The Centuries has shown so cogently, there is no one Christianity that you can point to; no Christ of faith that exists, but many Christs. No matter on either side of the debate, Miles says, what we have is a book (a series of books, actually) that shows a third way (as genius often does), leaving the two bickering schools in his literary dust.
In an Appendix to his work, Miles compares the two schools to people who try to see through a rose window in a cathedral, one school trying to remove the stain, the other trying to stain everything. Miles prefers to look at the window: the Gospel story, taken as a whole. The work of art this is the Bible is, after all, what captured the imagination of the world. Neither the Jesus of History nor the Christ of Faith is nearly as worthy of our attention as the character Jesus Christ of the Bible.
Miles writes that he was first inspired to write his two books by Bach's brilliant masterwork St. Matthew's Passion. Which brings us back to the half-facetious title of this review. Is Jack a saint? Perhaps. Perhaps not, but he is, in my estimation, performing as important a translation job as did St. Jerome back a thousand and a half years ago. By bringing the story (and both of the contending schools must remember that this faith has always been based on storytelling) of Jesus Christ back into focus, Miles has given us a Newer Testament: something fresh, despite the age of the story, something creative despite the re-hashing of familiar scenes, something that can truly bring the Spirit of God as close to us as our breath.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


62 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-written heresy, December 4, 2001
By 
Jeremy Garber "urbanmenno" (Denver, CO United States) - See all my reviews
Miles' book attempts to interpret the Gospels through formal literary criticism. Rather than attaching historical study to the Gospels' message, Miles treats Jesus and his message purely through the text, and comes to a startling conclusion -- that Jesus' death was necessary because God failed to deliver on God's promise to the Israelites, and needed a way to triumph on a metaphysical level.
Whether or not one agrees with Miles' premise, he writes brilliantly and understandably. Recent Biblical scholarship gets bogged down in dry-as-dust unintelligible "academicese." Miles understands the principles of clear and succint writing while still advancing complicated theories. I recommend this one for anyone seeking to stretch their understanding of what we have received as Scripture, as well as those interested in literature and how it relates to the Bible. Like him or not, read Miles to get your brain working.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Literary criticism of the Bible at its best!, May 16, 2002
By 
Therese "Treehugger" (Peoria, IL, United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Jack Miles, author of the Pulitzer Prize - winning *God -a Biogaphy* has written an excellent literary analysis of Christ in the New Testament.
What is the "crisis" referred to in the title? The crisis is that God has not delivered his Chosen People from 500 years of oppression. How does God solve this problem? Answer: God/Christ commits sacred suicide. This is Miles' provocative conclusion from his stirictly literary analysis the Christian Bible. How does Miles arrive at the conclusion? You, dear reader, should read the book in order to appreciate how he develops his plot and arrives at his conclusion. And believe me, there is a plot!
A caution is in order. Miles writes and studies Christ from a strictly literary point of view. He is not interested in the historical Jesus. If one reads this only to learn about the fundamentalist Jesus, the traditional Christian Jesus, or the historical Jesus, then this book will not satisfy! If on the other hand, you want to experience a great Biblical reading adventure, then buy and read this book!
I also would recommend that a reader, who is unfamiliar with literary critism and postmodernism, study and read Miles' appendices. "Appendix I" deals with the biblical canon and "Appendix II" deals with the history of critcal analysis of the Bible (e.g. historical criticism, canonical criticism, literary critcism)and how to appreciate the Bible as art.
I did not always agree with the author, but I enjoyed how he told the story of Christ. As a postmodern Christian, I will not privilege my reading over his.
Have fun reading *Christ: a Crisis in the Life of God*!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Pulitzer??, January 7, 2002
Pulitzer prize winning author Jack Miles, who wrote "God: A Biography", has finished in this work what he started in the other: a biographical analysis of God that developes both his character and characteristics throughout the writings of the old and new testaments. Written from a literary critic's perspective, Miles makes its clear from the beginning that his is not a historical or theological exegesis---something some reviewers have been in error to have expected. As such, Miles freely allows his character to to go where the literature of the bible takes him and to evolve plotwise from expectant creator, to general and ogre, to finally a loving father..
The outstanding contribution of Mile's book is the way it traces God's role from Israel's defender, to Israel's punisher, to finally the impotent (in this world) suffering servant who crucifies himself just before the entire country is about to be crucified along with him in the 70 AD and 135 AD rebellions against Rome. One can clearly see the changing motifs of the biblical writers as promise after promise in the bible fails to materialize and they are forced to literarily justify these failings in order to protect the integrity of their god. In the end, God's power is shifted to the next world and away from this one, in much the same way that Paul's theology shifted the second coming from this world to the next when it became obvious that it wasnt going to happen within his lifetime (read 1st Cor, 7:29). Miles, true to his committment to not render historical or theological conclusions, never explicitly says this, but it is obvious to anyone carefully reading the text.
I highly recommend this book for the reasons stated above, and would add that works such as Mile's go far towards the prospect of clarifying humanity's relationship with what Freud called the "hysteria" that humans feel when they, unlike any other animal on the planet (to our present knowledge), comprehend that their own life has an end..
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A creative and inspiring meditation, December 15, 2001
By 
This is a work of vast erudition, and its extremely clever author deserves the benefit of the doubt from his readers. Many reviewers of both this book and the author's previous book on the Tanakh (aka God: A Biography) evidently assume that there is something whimsical, shallow and capricious--even blasphemous--about Miles' meditation on the evolving character within history of the God of the Old Testament, and in this book, of God Incarnate as he is revealed in the New Testament. On the contrary, while highly original and beautifully written, to a Nietzchean level which is capable of glossing over weak or even dangerous arguments with lovely and sometimes thrilling prose--this book is in fact fundamentally grounded in some of the most recent, and exciting works of Biblical scholarship written in the last decade or so.
Before questioning the author's intentions, it might be wise to read two splendid commentaries on the New Testament, Moloney's commentary on the Gospel of John and Byrne's commentary on Romans, both published as part of the Catholic "Sacra Pagina" series and available on Amazon. These commentaries address the profound harmonies between Judaism and Christianity, and provide plenty of objective buttressing for the arguments put forward in a very readable and thought-provoking way by Miles.
It is true that the idea which Miles may consider the keynote of his thesis--his revision of the doctrine of atonement--will be rejected by believing Christians, and there is certainly nothing in the above-mentioned commentaries that supports Miles on that point. But this is a clearly demarcated part of his thesis, and the close and fascinating reading of the New Testament, principally the Gospel of John, that emerges from Miles' analysis follows the Scripture closely and is unrelated to Miles' unnecessarily provocative original contribution to the doctrine of atonement.
Often Miles adopts a rhetorical strategy that seems to distance himself from Christian belief, but this is generally a pose which allows him to maintain his scholarly credentials while taking the Scripture at face value. It might also be useful to read Leo Strauss's "Persecution and the Art of Writing" in order to understand Miles' strategy of creating enough intellectual elbow-room amidst the aridity and reductionism of historical Biblical criticism in order to propose his creative and generally reverent ideas.
Enjoy Miles's dazzling intellectual performance, but take him seriously as well. This is a very stimulating work that has an important place in the evolving reconciliation between Christianity and Judaism. One does not have to agree with everything in it to enjoy many benefits from Miles' thinking. It is a splendid and humane work of the religious imagination.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Gospels as a Work of Art, December 23, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God (Paperback)
Mr. Miles drives past the Jesus Seminarians, the historical Jesus freaks, and the Q gospel talking heads, toiling away with their picks and shovels, and says let's look at the gospels (primarily the Gospel of John) in a different way...as a piece of literature, a sort of historical novel, and see if that allows us to gain a better understanding of the main character, God.
That literary (not to be confused with literal) approach gives the reader a real sense of freedom from the heavy wet blankets of theological reverence (...God does not make mistakes!) and biblical historocity (...did this really happen?...can we attribute that saying directly to Jesus?), and allows him or her to reflect on the radical difference between God as presented in the Old Testament and God as presented incarnate as Jesus Christ.
How does one reconcile the God that appeared to Joshua, with sword drawn, as the Commander of Lord's Hosts, "the divine warrior in person," ready to lead the victorious assault on Israel's enemies in the battle of Jerico, with the God who delivered the Sermon on the Mount? How does God go from promising to crush Israel's enemies and restore a great, powerful and independent Israel, to being the God who declares victory by saying, "Take heart, I have conquered the world" just before he surrenders himself to be crucified by the hated Roman conqerers of Israel? Mr. Miles, accepting the gospel premise that Jesus is God, taking the stories in the bible at face value, weaves in the context of the times, first century Jewish culture, and God's previous covenant and history with Israel, and provides some elegant and provocative answers.
Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God is enlightening, thought provoking, provocative, blah, blah blah. I recommend it because it is such a refreshing and challenging approach to this subject. Literary perspective or not, make no mistake about it, Mr. Miles is quite serious about the underlying moral theology that is the message of the gospels. It's just that he presents the subject in such a facinating way, he makes it fun to just sit back and go for the ride.
Give yourself a treat, read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars When gods learn contrition, March 7, 2002
Miles' earlier work on a desert people's god, "God: A Biography," focused on a deity new at the job. Miles' portrayal depicted a god learning the role. He's inconsistent, breaks promises, commits genocide and grows increasingly dictatorial. At one point, a single man challenges him, winning a moral victory which clearly disturbs this irrational spirit. Finally, like an elderly curmudgeon, the deity simply withdraws from those he wishes to worship him.
According to Miles, after a long span of time the god has learned remorse. He has subjected his followers to a succession of invasions and dispersals. Israel becomes a client state of the Assyrians, Babylon, Greece, and now, Rome. As with many aged, powerful men, the god has reflected on his own actions and decided some positive actions are in order. He doesn't consider his career a failure, but discerns humanity's course isn't following its destined path. Genocide and other manifestations of his power are no longer the answer. A new course is necessary, so he becomes the Incarnation - a deity housed in a human body.
Miles portrayal of Christ's life shows how poorly this deity understands his creation. After all, as a god with neither peers nor serious challengers, he fails to understand human characteristics. Throughout the account, Christ is ambivalent in his assigned role. He shifts from expressing his divinity to being but a man, confused and perplexed by the role forced on him. He doesn't question his fate, knowing, at least in his adult life, that he is to be sacrificed. He understands the need for his role, but anticipates the pain as any of us would.
Miles relates how uncertainty leads to ambivalence in the behaviour of this Incarnation. Repelling followers at first, he begins gathering adherents, but, they too, are confused. Mostly Jews, his recruits think his mission is to restore Israel as promised. When they fail to understand his claim to a wider mission, they fail to comprehend. How can this "messiah" claim to redeem Israel when he offers succor to strangers and enemies? When he dies in such squalid circumstances, a social criminal, the distress among his followers is intense. Miles notes the significance of such a death, describing it as "a huge and horrifying surprise". Christ has not imparted his knowledge of the finale, leaving his followers confused and adrift. Even the resurrection seems hardly worthy of notice. There's no grandeur, no powerful declarations, little drama. The meaning of it all must be derived over time until the deity's original intention can be imparted to others. The result is not the god's accomplishment, but the people who had faith in the idea and imparted it to others.
Miles' account is full of inconsistencies and elf-contradictions. These are not author's faults, however, resulting instead from the material he consults and brings to our view. The Incarnation is as inconsistent as his "father," which isn't surprising given his previous career. Christ asserts the teachings of the Prophets foretell his coming, yet the god Miles portrays seems to know nothing of "love" in those days, particularly love of all humanity. The god's focus, promises and failures, are for Israel alone. How then, does this deity in its human incarnation, expect anyone to believe his new identity? Miles concludes that the act of sacrifice is self-explanatory needing no further elaboration.
Miles postscripts the story with a literary analysis of its telling. One interesting facet is the Bible's use of irony. Irony uses or "double meaning, or reversal of meaning. . . and will not stoop to explanation." He suggests that in this case, long-standing practices are suddenly reversed, then there is a place for irony in religion. He admits to the novelty of the concept, but argues that it fits the Judeo-Christian story. It's a compelling and challenging idea, but then, so is this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Opening the Field, October 17, 2003
By 
Richard Wells (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God (Paperback)
It's my good fortune to have spent about a year in India over the course of the last three years, and I've often hosted first time visitors. Conversations invariably move to an overview of Hinduism, a religion that is quite foreign to Westerners. Almost without fail my guests have voiced the belief that Hinduism is all myth, and not to be taken very seriously. I've taken to asking these folks what makes Hinduism more a myth, or fiction, or literary construct than Christianity, and, to no surprise, they've failed to come up with an answer. I'm sure if any of these folks had been dyed in the wool Christians I would have heard something about the revealed word of God, etc., etc., but they've been open-minded enough to ponder the questions and the implications of judging another's belief system based on their own.
With both, "God, a Biography," and "Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God," Jack Miles has opened the field of discourse by presenting the Primogenitor as a literary character rather than a factual being; and Christ as the same, regardless of his historical reality. He has asked Christians to look at their God in much the same way we look at "foreign" Gods. Was Krishna born on July 19, 3228 BCE, in Gokula, India? Will he return at the end of the current age to usher in a time of peacefulness? Was Jesus born on December 25th, 1 CE. Will he return to judge the living and the dead? To Hindu's Krishna walked, talked, made love, performed miracles. To Christians Christ did the same (except, perhaps, made love.) How much credence we give to any story depends on our orientation, but regardless of belief, the stories themselves are wonderful.
One reason they're wonderful is they are rich in metaphor, and it's the metaphor that Mr. Miles explores to great effect. Who can deny the beauty of an infant, and the idea of an infant knowingly giving love? Who can deny the power in the story of God admitting an error and sacrificing himself in an attempt at rectification?
Mr. Miles's success is that he opens the metaphor, and forces us to think.
Although I'm not a huge fan of Mr. Miles literary style - in fact, I find it a bit stilted - what he has to say more than adequately compensates for the difficulty style presents.
Highly Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


36 of 50 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Captivating ... for about 150 pages. After that... overdone, March 10, 2002
By 
Daryl Anderson (Trumansburg, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I suppose that readers who finished Miles' prior book, "God: A Biography" will be equally captivated by this new title - a sequel of sorts. But if this is your first exposure to Miles' "literary God" you might find, as I did, that your interest waxes, but quickly wanes.
The unusual approach he takes to his rather unique protagonist is really fascinating at first, but after a while it just wears out its welcome - a 30,000-word, tightly-edited piece in "The New Yorker" would have served the central idea better. While there is certainly a different artistic sensibility at work here, reading this book was something akin to watching "Rocky", then "Rocky II" and "III" all in a row. A relatively powerful theme and a stylistically new framework beats you up through repetition in too many guises. Imagine "Brother, Where Art Thou II"
Its hard to figure out who would enjoy this book end-to-end, as obviously quite a few have. A deeply and more traditionally Christian readership will be simply appalled by the diminishment of the central elements of their faith to historico-literary plot requirements. An agnostic, humanist or simply atheist readership will be put off by Miles' clear deep faith in the underlying reality of the story. I suppose "lit crit" types could enjoy it, but by eschewing the academic dryness of their genre, this book also steps outside their focus and stands as an implicit criticism of the emptiness of that approach.
The idea is intriguing enough at first take - to treat the biblical "God" as a literary character. Trace his (no Goddess here!) ups and downs from the perspective of how his collective authorship struggled to recreate a protagonist consistent with their culture's own diminishment and the failure of earlier `chapters' to come true - eventually turning to the plot "twists" of the New Testament and the new character in the story, Christ.
But that collectivity or authorship was a source of one of my itching complaints that eventually had to be scratched. Why not just attribute the twists and turns of the main characters of this God story to the unusual fact that it was written over hundreds of years, and by authors in the thrall of faith and a belief that earlier "drafts" were holy writ ? That is, why not follow the more traditional analyses that consider either the theological or the historical growth and change of the idea of God ? Admittedly these have often been dryer than Sinai dust, but that only suggests that the real accomplishment of Miles is to tell the story a lot more engagingly - the David McCullough of a different era.
After all - how many literary characters have been created thus, by dozens of authors over centuries ? It seems hardly the same thing as traditional character-based literary analysis - tracing the development in David Copperfield's or Silas Marner's personae over several hundred pages. Furthermore, Miles' tracings are rather sweeping. By the time I got to the chapter exploring the plumbing of Christ's sexuality I was at about the same point I would be if a similar book were exploring Huck Finn's unstated masturbatory life! Unless lit crit is your field, such tracings can hardly hold your interest as much as the stories themselves. Eventually the distinctiveness of the approach loses its freshness and starts to seem silly. A frankly good-old-fashioned fiction such as Mailer's or Saramago's is ultimately more satisfying.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Worthy Sequel to a Classic, April 17, 2004
By 
This review is from: Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God (Paperback)
"In what follows, the text of the New Testament will be considered rather as if it were a stained-glass window. That is, it will be looked at and appreciated as a work of art, rather than seen through in an attempt to discover the historical events that lie behind it." [p.13]
To those whose profession is to either inflate or deflate the gospels as a representation of actual history, this literary critique of the gospel account of Jesus' life may appear to be asking all of the wrong questions. But while the historical scholars duke it out over whether the gospels can be treated as history, the meaning of the gospels, in the broader context of the relationship between God and the Jewish people (and, later by extension, to the rest of the world). After five centuries since the promise of a restoration of the kingdom was first offered and no hope of it yet being fulfilled, a redefinition of the relationship was in order.
The gospels portray a redefinition of this relationship in ways that shocked the conscience of the average Jew. Not only would God come down in the form of a man (something that hadn't been done since the days of the early patriarchs), he would come not to conquer the world, but to re-enact the Passover, only this time, God would play a completely different role: the Sacrificial Lamb. The literary methods highlighted by Miles depict a story in which Jesus reveals only a little at a time, sometimes speaking in parables and other cryptic language, in order to pique the curiosity of his audience so that they can fully appreciate what he said at the right time.
As with his earlier book, God: A Biography, Miles looks at the text without the theological gloss of later religious commentators, and analyzes the text solely for its dramatic and literary value. Miles expressly makes the point that in the gospels, everything is mentioned for a reason. For example, Miles points out that the Devil's temptation of Jesus indicates more is implied than just an interaction between the Son of God and his archenemy. The Devil's questions and tests resemble those that a people who had been waiting a long time for God to restore them would ask. The post hoc theological worldview and the misplaced emphasis on the need for historical authenticity have dulled this edge of this passage.
Miles closes the book with a defense of the literary criticism method of analyzing the gospels, which he admits is the exception rather than the rule in the historical-critical vs. Christian apologetic debate. While the paucity of helpful archaeological data does little to help solve (or refute) the historical meaning that orthodox Christianity has made the primary focus, Miles' literary method gives us an evenhanded glimpse of what the message in the gospels must have been like to the original audience, which bears much more fruitful meaning, at least to the question of why people would dedicate their lives to Jesus Christ even when they were not relying on a historical record of an actual event.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God
Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God by Jack Miles (Paperback - November 5, 2002)
$16.95 $13.62
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.