Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.95
  • Save: $1.29 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Christ and the Media has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by JVG Books LLC
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Clean and Unmarked Copy.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Christ and the Media Paperback – April 15, 2003

18 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.66
$7.69 $7.81
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Save up to 40% on professional, scholarly and scientific resources.
Wiley's Summer Savings Event
Save up to 40% on professional, scholarly and scientific resources. Learn more.
$11.66 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Christ and the Media + The End of Christendom + Conversion: The Spiritual Journey of a Twentieth Century Pilgrim
Price for all three: $40.91

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Regent College Publishing (April 15, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573832529
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573832526
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.3 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #309,136 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Kendal B. Hunter on February 28, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is Malcolm Muggeridge's critique of The Media, with a special emphasis on television. His thesis is that 1) television is the greatest influence upon the modern word, and 2) televisions influence, on the whole, has been detrimental to civilization. (23)

His first lecture is a thought-experiment. He sees Christ rejecting an offer from Satan for prime-time TV appearance-what he called "the Fourth Temptation of Christ"- as the example for latter-day Christians (Lecture 1). By the very nature of televion, the Christian message would be distorted. Television is so controlled and stylized, it is essentially a "fantasy-machine" (62). He continually affirms that "the media is the world of shadows." (74)

His second thought-experiment is a bit more poignant. In the second lecture, entitled "The Dead Sea Videotapes," he imagines what future archaeologists would make of our world if they studied our television programs. His conclusion is that our civilization was a cult of progress, sexual consumption, and education. (53ff). Reality TV, anyone?

His last lecture is a boiler-plait discussion on television as epistemology. His specific target is the strictly homogenized, carefully edited product called "Newzak." After citing some startling incidents that evince that news is "not so much what has happened, as what can be seen [caught on tape] as happening, or what seems to have happened." (62) He closes his lecture and the conference by comparing TV with Plato's cave: if all we see are shadows on a wall, then for all intents and purposes, that is what is real.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Gord Wilson VINE VOICE on October 10, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Malcom Muggeridge is one of the funniest, most insightful and downright stubborn authors of the twentieth century. He was funny in Punch, the British humor magazine, he was funny on the BBC in "That Was the Week That Was," and even funny in a Monte Python meets real life sort of way when he got kicked off the BBC for alledgedly mocking the Queen. Of course it was all a misunderstanding, like the misunderstanding that got writer P.G.Wodehouse denounced as a traitor for making those wartime broadcasts from Germany. Malcom Muggeridge was the man who straightened that all out and got PGW repatriated, and later PG (Plum) Wodehouse was knighted as one of Britain's best. Surely there were no hard feelings toward Malcom as well.
Then Muggeridge did an interview with Mother Teresa for the BBC, and made a series of TV shows called A Third Testament about St. Augustine, Pascal, Tolstoy and other figures who had influenced him. At the same time that priests and bishops in England were leaving orders and losing faith, Muggeridge was somehow finding it. That would have been forgiveable, but he remained subversively funny. The essays collected in The Most of Malcom Muggeridge and Tread Softly For You Tread On My Jokes are side-splittingly funny and rank among the best of Punch's drollery. His two volume autobiography even has a funny title: The Chronicles of Wasted Time. Christ and the Media doesn't have a funny title (which may be why it originally went out of print so soon), but it contains a funny essay called "The Fourth Temptation." In a humorous role-reversal, journalist Muggeridge is also interviewed by the BBC. His roasts of the media in his many books are so funny that his opponents had no recourse but to put his books out of print. Thanks to Regent College, their little trick didn't work, and this subversive little volume is once again at large. Get it while you can and write your own review.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. Schroeter on January 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is probably one of Malcolm's most interesting works for a couple of reasons. First, he is at the top of his game in his use of English and reason. Second, because this is the most unmitigated and focused response to liberal media I have ever read. It was so direct and harsh that66 at times I found I wasn't sure I agreed with him. However, the more I mulled over the thoughts and worked through it, the more I realized I was in agreement with his premises. Excellent and thorough, though it will seem a bit short.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Aimee Thor on March 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
Muggeridge was wise beyond his time! This book is utterly fascinating and kept me spellbound for days. He explores the many issues that modern media practices bring to our culture. A wonderful, though troubling look at life through the lens. Awesome reading!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. Christensen on November 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
Muggeridge was a modern-day prophet in that he had a clear perception and understanding of the impact of Television on Western Media. In his words, "It is a truism to say that the media in general, and TV in particular...are incomparably the greatest single influence in our society today...This influence [is] largely exerted irresponsibly, arbitrarily, and without reference to any moral or intellectual, still less spiritual, guidelines whatsoever. Furthermore, if it is the case, as I believe, that what we still call Western civilization is fast disintegrating, then the media are playing a major role in the process by carrying out, albeit for the most part unconsciously, a mighty brainwashing operation, whereby all traditional standards and values are being denigrated to the point of disappearing, leaving a moral vacuum in which the very concepts of Good and Evil have ceased to have any validity."

He clearly describes the power of the editor (of TV news/documentaries especially) to present "the truth" or "reality" live, in living color, through carefully edited clips--which present the event from the perspective of the editor--telling the story the way the editor wants to present it, which may be (and often is) very different from "the truth" as seen and experienced by the various people involved in the event.

Bernard Goldberg, in his book "Bias", has described several examples from CBS News, and there have been many more recently.

Muggeridge's only practical solution: "Put a Christian behind the camera.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?