and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.04
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.91 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Who Is Jesus Christ? Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew Paperback – September 30, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.04
$8.37 $4.01


Frequently Bought Together

Who Is Jesus Christ? Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew + No Wonder They Call Him the Savior: Discover Hope In The Unlikeliest Place
Price for both: $25.30

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Our Sunday Visitor (September 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592765998
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592765997
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.2 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,729,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Who is Jesus Christ? Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew is a very serious and well-thought-out attempt to teach us once again just who is being proclaimed in the Gospel of Saint Matthew. It is a slow, steady journey through this Gospel, a journey that pauses over and over again to examine in a thoughtful and prayerful way the names and titles given to our Lord in this Gospel... I hope that in the years to come [Sammons] will follow this book up with later volumes on the other evangelists. I also hope that we will see more and more books like this, intelligent, erudite, yet accessible, on our Divine Savior and his life and personality." - --Fr. Benedict Groeschel, C.F.R.

About the Author

Eric Sammons is head of Evangelization at St. John Neumann Parish in Gaithersburg, MD, and is completing his M.A. in Theology degree at the Franciscan University of Steubenville. He writes the popular Catholic blog The Divine Life. He is co-founder of the not-for-profit Little Flowers Foundation, whose mission is to assist Catholic families seeking to adopt special-needs children. Eric lives with his wife Suzan and five children in Maryland.

More About the Author

Eric Sammons is Director of Evangelization for the Diocese of Venice in Florida and has a Master's degree in Theology from the Franciscan University of Steubenville. A convert to Catholicism from Evangelical Protestantism, Sammons has appeared on EWTN and is a frequent guest on Catholic radio, as well as the former co-host of the Washington, DC radio show "Catholic Matters." His articles have appeared in OSV Newsweekly, Homiletic & Pastoral Review, Catholic Online and CatholicExchange.com

Eric lives with his wife Suzan and six children in Florida.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
The next time I read, I pick up a different book from the book pile.
Marcel LeJeune
Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew (Our Sunday Visitor, 208 pages, paperback), a book that prematurely answered the Pope's call.
Brandon Vogt
Sammons's style is not only approachable and entertaining, but the premise of the book is one that I appreciated.
Sarah Reinhard

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Brandon Vogt on November 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
In Pope Benedict XVI's recent letter Verbum Domini, the Pope called Christians to a deeper love for the Word of God. In particular, Benedict encouraged a fuller, more holistic approach to Scripture. This approach looks at the Bible through the lens of the Church, not through the lens of secular scholasticism, and it is an invitation to harness the full arsenal of Church Tradition: the Church Fathers, the writings of Saints and Popes, dogmas, doctrines, and the formulations of Church councils.

Back in late September, Catholic blogger Eric Sammons released a new book titled Who Is Jesus Christ? Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew (Our Sunday Visitor, 208 pages, paperback), a book that prematurely answered the Pope's call.

In Who Is Jesus Christ?, Eric uses 25 chapters to explore each of the names and titles ascribed to Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew. The book begins with lesser emphasized labels, like "ghost" and "carpenter's son", then builds with familiar roles like "prophet" and "teacher", and finally crescendos into the most fundamental title of all, "Jesus".

While browsing the book, the content seems fairly heady. But Eric's lucid, eloquent style draws the reader from page to page without overwhelming them; anyone with a basic knowledge of the Bible should be able to understand most of Eric's meditations.

But despite its clear prose, Who Is Jesus Christ? features deep material. Quotes from Church Fathers pepper every chapter, while liturgical prayers, commentary from the Saints, and Eric's own reflections fill out the rest of the pages. This book is what holistic Scripture study looks like, a model to be emulated.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Cammie on November 11, 2010
Format: Paperback
"Who is Jesus Christ? Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew" by Eric Sammons is one of the best books that I've read in a very long time. At the moment I'm alternating between not letting my copy, which I've just finished but already want to read again, out of my sight, and thinking of people who I know who would really enjoy reading it.

The book is a careful study of Jesus Christ, as seen through the names that he is called in the Gospel of Matthew. Each name is the subject of a chapter. The chapters are further divided into five sections so that the book flows naturally from title to title. The first section, "Incomplete Perceptions" includes the chapters: Man, Rabbi, Ghost, Carpenter's Son, John the Baptist, Elijah, and Jeremiah. The next section "Roles" is made up of King of Jews, Prophet, Lord of the Sabbath, King of Israel, Teacher, Christ and Lord. This is followed by Old Testament Prophecies and Figures: Nazarene, Shepherd, Physician, Bridegroom, and Emmanuel. The forth section titled simply "Son" includes the many ways Jesus was addressed that included that same name: Son of Abraham, Son of David, Son of Man, Son of God and "My Beloved Son." Lastly Sammons looks at the name given to Joseph by an angel: Jesus.

While I read it chapter by chapter, absorbing the amazing insight that each name reveals, I am certain I will learn even more when I read it again (there's just so much information and insight!). Paul has spent the past weeks looking up when I interrupted him from whatever paper he was working on to share one insight or another that had never even occurred to me. From the question "did you know that only one person in the book of Matthew calls Jesus "Rabbi?" (Do you know who it is? The same person uses it two times!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Reinhard VINE VOICE on April 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book smacked of "Bible study" and maybe the brilliant author will forgive me for having put off reading my review copy for so very long. Because, you know what? It wasn't at all what I expected. Sammons's style is not only approachable and entertaining, but the premise of the book is one that I appreciated. Instead of going through Matthew verse by verse, Sammons takes each title of Jesus used in the Gospel and compiles it into a section. There are 25 of these (why was I surprised by that number?), and they're all done completely and yet succinctly. After reading this book, I truly do feel like I know Jesus a little better...and that I want to pursue the Gospels to get to know Him even better. This was not only unlike any other study I've seen, but also a way of making the Gospel truly real and living. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search