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Christianity and the Nature of Science: A Philosophical Investigation Paperback – June 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Book House; 2nd edition (June 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801062497
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801062490
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #410,981 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

I am enthusiastic about this book. I think it presents some important ideas that we, as Christians working in science, need to explore and discuss. The book should be very suitable for a text in a science course for non-science students, and I intend to use it for such a course. -- Bernard J. Piersma, Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith

Moreland has undertaken to give Christians a clear-eyed conception of science that does its legitimate authority full justice but is sharply resistant to contemporary tendencies to take that authority as ultimate, global, and autonomous.... Christianity and the Nature of Science is a nice piece of work.... I can recommend the book very highly. -- Del Ratzsch, Calvin Theological Journal

About the Author

J. P. Moreland (Ph.D., University of Southern California) is professor of philosophy at Talbot School of Theology. He has authored or coauthored many books, including Scaling the Secular City, Love Your God with All Your Mind, and Immortality: The Other Side of Death.

More About the Author

With degrees in philosophy, theology, and chemistry, I have taught theology and philosophy at several schools throughout the U.S. I have authored or co-authored several dozen books including Kingdom Triangle, Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview; Christianity and the Nature of Science; Scaling the Secular City; Does God Exist?; Immortality: The Other Side of Death; and The Life and Death Debate: Moral Issues of Our Times. I am a co-editor of Christian Perspectives on Being Human and Jesus Under Fire: Modern Scholarship Reinvents the Historical Jesus. My academic work appears in journals and periodicals such as Christianity Today, Philosophia Christi, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, and The American Philosophical Quarterly. I served with Campus Crusade for 10 years, planted two churches, and I have spoken on over 200 college campuses. Presently, my wife and I attend the Anaheim Vineyard Christian Fellowship.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Marc Swikull on February 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
J.P. Moreland, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Talbot School of Theology, Biola Univsersity, does a great service to the Christian (and non-Christian) scholarly community in laying out the foundational issues in the philosophy of science and how they relate to Christian theology.
The work covers the definition, methodology, scope, and presuppositions of scientific investigation as well as a thorough examination of the "realism"/"anti-realism" debate within the philosophy of science. Lastly, Moreland gives a thorough treatment of "The Status of Scientific Creationism."
This book is intellectually rigorous. It is serves as a thorough introduction that is particularly encouraging to the Christian academic community. If you are either a student or a professor, you will come away much more educated.
The book also contains an excellent bibliography for those who are interested in further study.
Moreland is a bona-fide Christian scholar--not someone who is carelessly defending creationism. Rather, he writes from the perspective of a thoughtful philosopher.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
First, I'd like to encourage everyone who might be persuaded by the arguments of the disparaging reviewers to read the book, as Moreland answers arguments like the ones they raise quite well. I'd also encourage everyone to read and be fair even to arguments they find personally threatening to their worldview. The reaction of some people to questioning the authority of science are identical to the reaction of some people to the questioning of the authority of religion. And this is not a coincidence, we all react poorly when what we worship is questioned.
Finished this book a couple of weeks ago and I was very impressed. This book is an introduction to the philsophy of science but it's written as a refutation of scientism (the belief that only scientific knowledge is real knoweldge) and an apologia for creation science. However, Moreland's bias should not be taken as indicative of the depth of his treatment of his subject. He gives what seemed to my virgin ears to be a very substantial treatment of the demarcation problem, to the issue of scientific realism, and to the various alternatives to scientific realism. Despite what some might think, Moreland himself actually comes down on the side of "eclectic" scientific realism, which is the belief that some of the theories of science should be interpreted realisitcally (heliocentrism, for example) and other perhaps should not (wave/particle duality, string theory, etc.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Nate Jacobson on January 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Moreland's book is an excellent review of the issues philosophers of science (and some scientists) grapple with in evaluating the legitimacy and implications of scientific claims. Scientism, the view that science is the preeminent source of knowledge, is delineated and critiqued. Moreland gives good reason for a more critical view of naive scientific self-confidence, and he argues persuasively that theistic hypotheses can fall within the pale of science correctly understood.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jacob Prahlow on November 29, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Moreland gives his readers here an excellent introduction to analyzing scientific assumptions and asking philosophically grounded and pertinent questions. This work is extremely reflexive and provides readers with an excellent framework for rationally warranting a philosophical investigation of one's own assumptions as well as those of the scientific community at-large that Moreland encounters. An excellent book that will be beneficial to both the relative novice as well as those who have experience in philosophy and theoretical discourse.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Ethan E. Harris on January 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Of course everyone has biases, and some foolishly think that philosophy is useless. Some think that only that which can be physically reproduced in a laboratory situation is that which is valid; in which case, all thought is irrelevant. Some people involve themselves in happy contradictions.
Moreland is outstanding in the area of pointing out difficulties with resolutions in the area of thought and rationality. This is a very interesting and educational read for those who think they can "pos[e] a hypothesis that can be physically tested" as the foundation of truth and thought.
Dr. Moreland does not wave his education in the face of the reader. He doesn't make you feel "less" because you don't have a degree. I've never taken a class by him, but he is a great instructor, even if you disagree with some of his points.
All in all this is a worthwhile book to contemplate.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Book Guy on February 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very sophisticated discussion of philosophy of science issues, especially the sections on realism and anti-realism. Many skeptics of religion simply are unaware how much of their secular, scientific worldview is based on assumptions about what is real and how we know things. Just because science can produce technology that works, such as cell phones, does that mean that what science tells us about "reality" is true? The Nova TV specials and the Discovery Channel all speak as if the "Big Bang" or "evolution" were objective scientific phenomenon, just as concrete as a test tube full of sulfuric acid. Moreland effectively and clearly explores the literature that sees these as constructs or myths depending as much on inferences and conceptual architecture as they do on any real observations.
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