Christianity without the Cross and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $1.50 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by GrammiesAttic
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: In VERY GOOD, gently used condition with tight binding, clean, crisp pages. Text is free of any markings, writings, or highlighting. Ships from Amazon warehouse...Amazon customer service and money back guarantee.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Christianity without the Cross: A History of Salvation in Oneness Pentecostalism Paperback – April 1, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-1581125849 ISBN-10: 1581125844

Buy New
Price: $28.45
23 New from $23.99 20 Used from $16.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$28.45
$23.99 $16.00
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books

Frequently Bought Together

Christianity without the Cross: A History of Salvation in Oneness Pentecostalism + Oneness Pentecostals and the Trinity
Price for both: $48.05

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 404 pages
  • Publisher: Universal Publishers (April 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581125844
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581125849
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.8 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #785,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 73 people found the following review helpful By J. Istre on November 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
When people think of the UPC, they immediately think of Holiness Standards, Jesus Name baptism, and Oneness theology. However, it has not always been this easy to describe Oneness people. The United Pentecostal Church (UPC) formed in 1945 with the merger of two organizations: Pentecostal Church, Incorporated (PCI) and the Pentecostal Assemblies of Jesus Christ (PAJC). The main difference between the organizations was the interpretation of the New Birth. Both organizations subscribed to Repentance, baptism by immersion in Jesus' name and receiving the Holy Spirit (Ghost) by glossolalia (speaking in tongues, or babbling incoherently). However, the largest faction of PAJC believed this three-step formula was required to enter heaven and avoid hell fire, whereas the PCI largely believed that one was justified at repentance and that water baptism and spirit filled glossolalia were not necessary to avoid hell fire. The merger language was very carefully chosen to bring these two groups together to agree on the fundamental doctrine. The phrase "full salvation" was the magic term that the PAJC interpreted to mean that the three steps were necessary, whereas the PCI position could interpret "full" to mean something more than mere "salvation" which to them was achieved at repentance. "Full salvation" to a PCI was indeed the three-step formula, but not defining for one's eternal destiny. Such was the agreement at the merger that ministers would not contend over this issue to the destruction of the new body called UPC. The problem appears to be that official publications of the UPC do not wish for many to know about the PCI tradition within the organization.Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Lew Ferris on May 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
As a former United Pentecostal Church minister, to confess that I read this book with great interest is an understatement. Oneness Pentecostals owe it to themselves to read this book carefully. No history of the Oneness movement as this book documents is available through any Oneness source. I was facinated by the wealth of background information that Mr. Fudge has documented at great length, and by the interviews he held with Oneness ministers and adherents some of who I know personally! And as to the accuracy of the information in this book....Mr. Fudge is right on! The words and writings of well known Oneness pioneers such as H. A. Goss, John Paterson, Andrew Urshan, C.H. Yadon, and G.T. Haywood will amaze the Oneness reader. And this is not just hearsay! Everything is documented.
However, challenges have already been made to the accuracy of some of the information in this book but no quotes or references were given, or any documentation cited. By way of criticism, however, I am not totally comfortable with the main title of this work "Christianity Without The Cross." Contrary to a very large percentage of what Oneness pioneers believed (with whom I agree), most Oneness believers today (with whom I disagree), do in fact equate the "water and the Spirit" of John 3:5 with water baptism in Jesus' Name and the infilling of the Holy Ghost evidenced by speaking in tongues as the new birth, however, they do believe that it is the "Cross of Christ" that makes it possible for repentant sinners to partake of the "water and the Spirit" as they believe it. Great book!
11 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Lewis on August 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
The title of this work serves as a lightning rod. It is bound to be controversial (and a perusal of the earlier reviews substantiate such a conclusion). While the title will almost certainly be objectionable to most members of the UPCI, I submit that it is legitimate so long as one understands a careful distinction the author intends. Dr. Fudge uses the term "the cross" to refer to the preaching of the cross in a Pauline sense. He takes it primarily from Paul's letters, and specifically from 1 Corinthians 1:17-18. As such, the preaching of the cross is the message of salvation by grace through faith in the reconciling death of Christ. While Dr. Fudge says as much in the text of the book, this special nuance is not immediately apparent in the title, while his explanation is not near the beginning of the book. Nevertheless, the fact remains that while members of the UPCI believe in the crucifixion of Jesus as an historical event, they decidedly do not believe in the cross in this special sense as the sole means of salvation. No one, according to them, can be saved according to the Reformation rubric of sola fide and sola gratia. Rather, one is saved by following the UCPI interpretation of Acts 2:38. Given this theological differentiation between "the cross" and the "the crucifixion," it is entirely appropriate to say, as does the title of this book, that the UPCI advocates "Christianity without the cross", even though its members believe in the historical fact of Jesus' crucifixion.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 1, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Finally, a work that undoes the myths perpetrated by a Protestant denomination on itself and its adherents. I was amazed to read what many Oneness Pentecostal "pioneers" really believed... which runs contrary to the histories written by themselves post-merger. The two groups that merged in 1945 (PCI and PAJC) did NOT believe in the absolute necessity of oneness theology, baptism, nor the sign of "tongues" for salvation, as is purported in said "histories." This book, the result of MANY interviews and obviously tedious, painstaking research (it is profusely footnoted)sheds light on the history of a movement that self-claims to be "the true" bride of Christ. Names of good men, often pushed aside in the mythologized histories created by the UPCI are finally given their due, as major more mainline evangelical contributors to a union of Pentecostals gone awry in the past 3-4 decades. They did NOT all believe as the UPCI does today, and they were not the exclusive band of believers they are portrayed to be by their current UPCI biographers. As a former member and minister of this denomination, I can only say thanks to the author for unraveling the web of misrepresentations and letting the facts shed light on these formerly unchallenged revisionist self-histories. Although the title initially seems a bit harsh, it seems more appropriate after a thorough read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?