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  • A Christmas Tale (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
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A Christmas Tale (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]


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The Criterion Collection
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Product Details

  • Actors: Catherine Deneuve, Jean-Paul Roussillon, Anne Consigny, Mathieu Amalric, Melvil Poupaud
  • Directors: Arnaud Desplechin
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Color, NTSC, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Criterion
  • DVD Release Date: December 1, 2009
  • Run Time: 152 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002PHVGYA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #216,898 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

New, restored high-definition digital transfer
L'aimee: Desplechin's 2007 documentary
New documentary featuring interviews with Desplechin and actors
Original theatrical trailers
New and improved English subtitle translation
PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by critic Philip Lopate

Editorial Reviews

In Arnaud Desplechin’s beguiling A Christmas Tale (Un conte de Noël), Catherine Deneuve brings her legendary poise to the role of Junon, matriarch of the troubled Vuillard family, who come together at Christmas after she learns she needs a bone marrow transplant from a blood relative. That simple family reunion setup, however, can’t begin to describe the unpredictable, emotionally volatile experience of this film, an inventive, magical drama that’s equal parts merriment and melancholy. Unrequited childhood loves and blinding grudges, brutal outbursts and sudden slapstick, music, movies, and poetry, A Christmas Tale ties it all together in a marvelously messy package.

Stills from A Christmas Tale (Click for larger image)






Customer Reviews

The cinematography is also attractive as is the score.
Mike Liddell
The ending is inexcusable, providing no resolution to the main mystery presented in the beginning, but instead ends with a fuzzy illogical trick ending.
Stephen McHenry
The family in question could be called quirky, but that would bring to mind "The Royal Tennenbaums", and this family is not that one.
Gryphonisle

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Eric M. Eiserloh on October 18, 2009
Format: Blu-ray
This one is not for everyone. Most people will probably not only have trouble with its length, but its style, as well. Both as wild as it is imaginative, Christmas Tale is like a post-modern jazz score, mixing elements from a variety of cinematic styles that are jarring (at times), but always interesting to behold. As long as the film is, it always keeps moving and changing before our very eyes. What makes its odd stylistic combinations work is the compelling depths of its explorations into family and the bonds the unite, or divide us. Like and The Royal Tennenbaums, with a nouvelle vague twist, the film is not only full of odd combinations of image and music, but seems to jump from one film to another from scene to scene, as if each character or emotional quality (from light comedy to serious drama) were each receiving its own rendering. At times, the characters turn and speak directly to the camera. The filmmaker also intercedes by providing chapter headings and keyhole views, but, somehow, what could have become a cacophony of chaos, turns into a wonderment of cinema that any real cinephile will be amazed to behold and want to experience again....
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Glida on November 5, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
French director Arnaud Desplechin's film works as one of the best mult-layered movies of the genre, which in many respects takes its conventions and turns them on their head. Not your feel good, holiday coming home movie but one which inverts and mischievously perverts viewer expectations and instead dares to substitute real people for the usual suspects. The first rate acting (the legendary Catherine Deneuve and the not as well known but no less talented Desplechin actors Mathieu Almaric and Emmanuelle Devos) takes a conventional genre situation - mother (Denueve) suffers from cancer and needs a bone marrow transplant - and explores the generational conflicts that afflict this family and provocatively and evocatively deals with the issues of mother love; forgiveness; sibling rivalry; grief for thwarted dreams and life changing losses, and even fidelity itself. For film lovers who enjoy characters in unconventional situations, this film will continue to reward upon future viewings. Those requiring conventional Hollywood plotting and endings should probably look elsewhere. I would add that the director is one of the best working today. One of the best films of 2008.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By William Shriver on December 2, 2009
Format: DVD
[4.5 stars] It may be a mistake to call this a "dysfunctional family Christmas movie." The individuals of the Vuillard family have, in fact, all submitted themselves to the precise roles that will allow the family to function. And that is the real problem. Each has to contort himself, at times almost beyond human recognition, in order for things to make a certain sort of sense. There is distance in how they address each other: no "maman", no "papa", just first names all around. The system that allows this family to function even includes "Anatole," an imaginary wolf that lives in the basement. It is a well-honed system.

The mother, father, three siblings, assorted cousins and spouses that populate this family tree all have a psychic tie to a withered root, namely the firstborn son, Joseph, who died of a rare cancer at age six. Elizabeth, the oldest surviving child, complains of a grief that has no apparent source. She is the type of person we all have met at some time in our lives, someone whose main grievance is that she feels herself to be inadequately aggrieved. She completely surrenders herself to the false martyrdom of self-pity, willingly clutching each grudge to her bosom, even as it drains her of life and poisons everyone around her.

We see how Henri, the middle child, becomes Elizabeth's chosen victim, and Ivan, the youngest, tries to mollify everyone. All of this has a decidedly theatrical effect. The family members are depicted as performers just as much as the Ekdahls are in Fanny and Alexander (Special Edition Five-Disc Set) - Criterion Collection, with whose first 90 minutes A CHRISTMAS TALE bears more than a passing resemblance.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Ellington VINE VOICE on July 2, 2012
Format: DVD
While watching this marvelous film, I didn't expect it would divide people the way that it has. In my eyes, there wasn't anything to dislike. In fact, I was so absorbed and so taken by what I was seeing that it quickly shot to the top of my personal ballot for the year of 2008 and, in reflection, I think it may be one of the very best films of the last decade. Coming to the site to post a review and I was floored to see the negative responses by so many (I say `so many' knowing that that is only appropriated to the lack of reviews, since there are only a total of 19, including my own). Yes, for every person saying that this is five star worthy (which it is) there are two saying that it is not.

WHAT?!?!?!

Oh well, we can't all love the same things. Some balk at the `Frenchness' of this film and I say "give me more" considering that the French make, by far, the best films ever. Seriously, when is `French' a negative term when describing a film? Also, this is a FRENCH film, so why weren't you expecting it to be `very French'? Yes, this is French in the way it is molded, but it is also a more serious mined French film. This isn't indicative of the New Wave cinema of the past and so while the scenarios painted and the actions of certain individuals may not feel `American' and may feel `foreign' to us, there is a sincerity here, an honesty that really befits the nature of the film. This is more comparable to 2009's `Summer Hours' in tone and overall impact. There is style in the layout and there are moments of flamboyance, but they are tapered to present a more natural and relaxed reality.

The film tells the story of a dysfunctional family reuniting for Christmas after word of the matriarch's cancer spreads.
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