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Christmastide: Prayers for Advent Through Epiphany from The Divine Hours Paperback – October 21, 2003


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Frequently Bought Together

Christmastide: Prayers for Advent Through Epiphany from The Divine Hours + The Divine Hours (Volume Two): Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime: A Manual for Prayer + The Divine Hours (Volume Three): Prayers for Springtime: A Manual for Prayer (Tickle, Phyllis)
Price for all three: $39.18

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 276 pages
  • Publisher: Galilee Trade (October 21, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385510268
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385510264
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #429,882 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Tickle, a prolific author and contributing editor for PW, makes her marvelous trilogy The Divine Hours accessible to novice readers unaccustomed to the ancient church tradition of fixed-hour prayer. Beginning with the first Sunday in Advent and continuing through the 12 days of Christmas through Epiphany, this manual includes daily offices for morning, noon and vespers. The times of each office are flexible; late risers will be thrilled to see that the morning liturgy can be accomplished anytime between 6 and 9 a.m. There are readings, hymns and psalms for each day, as well as a prayer appointed for each week. The manual is intended for individual use, but can be adapted for "those blessed occasions in our lives when the office can be kept in company with others."
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Inside Flap

?A welcome remedy for the increasing number of lay Christians who have rediscovered the daily offices. Tickle puts each day?s prayers, psalms, readings, and refrains?everything you need?in one place. The rhythm that Tickle?s book establishes gives one a stronger sense of participating in an ancient, worldwide but very personal liturgy.?
?Nora Gallagher, beliefnet.com, and author of Things Seen and Unseen: A Year Lived in Faith

The third and final volume in a trilogy of prayer manuals compiled by Publishers Weekly religion editor Phyllis Tickle as a contemporary Book of Hours to guide Christians gently yet authoritatively through the daily offices.

The Divine Hours is the first major literary and liturgical reworking of the sixth-century Benedictine Rule of fixed-hour prayer. This beautifully conceived and thoroughly modern three-volume guide will appeal to the theological novice as well as to the ecclesiastical sophisticate. Making primary use of the Book of Common Prayer and the writings of the Church Fathers, The Divine Hours is also a companion to the New Jerusalem Bible, from which it draws its Scripture readings. The trilogy blends prayer and praise in a way that, while extraordinarily fresh, respects and builds upon the ancient wisdom of Christianity.

The third and final book in the set, Prayers for Springtime, provides prayers, psalms, and readings for this season associated with rebirth. Compact, with deluxe endpapers, it is perfect for those seeking greater spiritual depth. As a contemporary Book of Hours, The Divine Hours: Prayers for Springtime heralds a renewal of the tradition of disciplined daily prayer, and gives those already using the first two volumes the completion they are seeking. With this volume, the series culminates with three prayer manuals encompassing the liturgical and calendar year with the offices for every day.


From the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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The Kindle version is quite difficult to use.
N. Ackles
I loved that it is the daily office, yet with the Advent readings.
T
Rather dry; quickly became monotonous and burdensome to read.
D. Knighton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By V. Zaprzal on January 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
The Christmastide book is the perfect book to use for those who are starting to learn about the Liturgy of the Hours. We used this book at my parish throughout the Advent Season before weekday morning mass. We have since adapted to the regular morning prayer, but this book is a great way to start before going to the full version. I would recommend this book to anyone! The only con is the small print.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Adrienne Brown on December 1, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was extremely disappointed in the Kindle format of this book. It has almost no table of contents, and the different days for prayers are not numbered, delineated by weekday, or anything. For example, you cannot look for "First week of advent", or "Monday" or anything like that. There are just a bunch of prayers run together in sequence: morning, daytime, evening, morning, daytime, evening. How can anyone find the prayer for the right day of advent when there are no date markings or references of any kind? In contrast to the Pocket Edition of the Divine Hours, by the same author which has beautiful formatting and is easy to use, this book is totally unusable.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David Kenney on December 24, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A few years ago I might have been skeptical or leery about something like this... I was talking to one of my friends a while back and she was telling me how she had taken her son to the park to play and she observed a nun who was praying "while reading from a book." She told me that it "just looked so unnatural, why don't you just pray freely and openly and come before God as yourself - using your own words?"

And I would imagine a lot of people might feel that way.

But the liturgy of the hours is more than just praying traditional prayers or praying through scripture, it's about getting into a rhythm of prayer. When you pray the divine hours you are allowing the prayers to govern your time instead of just praying "whenever you feel like it."

Plus, praying through scripture has been happening since long before Christ. In fact, we know that even Christ prayed the scriptures. From the cross Jesus prays, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" Which is a direct quote from Psalm 22. Praying or quoting the first line of a scriptural text was a way of "referencing" the entire passage. It was a way of saying, "I feel like this" or "remember this and what this teaches?"

And last, though praying the hours might feel like its weighted heavily in church tradition, well....that's because it is. And I think that's one of the bigger sellers for me.

I was reading somewhere about how the designers at Volkswagen decided to re-release the Beetle. And surprisingly enough it came about as a knee jerk reaction to the boom of the internet and the quick rise of technology. It seems that as each new year came and left, more and more people felt they were being thrust faster into the future.
Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Bell on December 18, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Simple order of personal worship for each day in Advent and Christmas.
This is not a book to be read for pleasure, but instructions for those of us who did not grow up in churches that taught fixed hour prayer.
It is done in an easy way to follow.
Not quite liturgy for dummies, but close.
Very useful.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Andrew R Steere on November 7, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have the paperback version of this book, which is wonderful. Unfortunately, the Kindle version has no day/date at the beginning of each day's reading. None at all. At the beginning of Advent it just starts on the first Sunday closest to November 30, and from there in there is absolutely no reference to what day of the week you are reading. Really disappointed and cannot use this book at all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By N. Ackles on December 10, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Kindle version is quite difficult to use. It is possible to find a directory of days in the Table of Contents, but when you tap one of the very-close-together lines, you have no way of knowing for sure which day you ended up in. The daily prayers aren't labeled with the day, important information that is at the top of every page of the print version. You can't simply return to where you last read because each evening you go to Compline, which is at the back of the book. Also, the Kindle version has some really odd spacing (paging) of the Vespers hymns with unusual errors of mixed text from time to time.
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