Customer Reviews


308 Reviews
5 star:
 (158)
4 star:
 (60)
3 star:
 (26)
2 star:
 (18)
1 star:
 (46)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


191 of 202 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So HAPPY to See these in their Entirety
Rather than the cartoons of Snow White, Cinderella, Pinnochio, Peter Pan, Bambi and so on, I was a resident of the land of Narnia when I was a kid. And not because my family is ultra-religious either. In fact, we never really picked up on the biblical parallels until we read about them on this website!

What we saw was a basic battle between good and evil and a...
Published on August 9, 2004 by Trekkintheplains

versus
32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Chronicling "Narnia"
A new big-screen adaptation of the Narnia Chronicles is currently in the works, to fill the gap that "Lord of the Rings" left behind. But it isn't the first adaptation of C.S. Lewis's classic fantasies -- in the 1980s, the BBC made their own adaptation.

"The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe" introduces us to the Pevensie kids, four teenagers who are staying in...
Published on August 12, 2005 by E. A Solinas


‹ Previous | 1 231 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

191 of 202 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So HAPPY to See these in their Entirety, August 9, 2004
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Rather than the cartoons of Snow White, Cinderella, Pinnochio, Peter Pan, Bambi and so on, I was a resident of the land of Narnia when I was a kid. And not because my family is ultra-religious either. In fact, we never really picked up on the biblical parallels until we read about them on this website!

What we saw was a basic battle between good and evil and a great group of kids who had to conquer their shortcomings to become the best people they could be. They faced adversity and had to stand on their own against even their own friends and siblings to do what was right. And in the end, they triumphed! For me, this series contributed much more to my sense of self, my take on right and wrong, and my maturity than any Disney cartoons ever could have!

I first saw these movies on Public tv, PBS, when I was maybe 4 or 5 years old and my Mom had the foresight to record them to video tape for me. Over the years, I watched the tapes so much that they were really beginning to have poor quality, plus some pieces of the movies were missing. That's why I was delighted when these came out on DVD! Even at 20 years old, I still like to revisit my childhood for a time and I hope to share them with my children when the time comes, that being when I become a Mom.

I think my favorite would be The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the adventures are so varied and the ship is just beautiful! I love to see Eustace's transformation and all the islands they visit have so many different things and people to discover. Like Deathwater Island, the Island of the Dufflepuds and of course the Silver Sea and the underwater Warrior Sea People. This part of the film also leaves the least out. It includes most of the adventures from the book and allows time for plot development. I was disappointed that Prince Caspian is really that short, I wish they had made it longer.

My main complain is, why aren't The Magician's Nephew, The Horse and His Boy and The Last Battle included? Why weren't these books made into films?

However, I have even more compliments for this particular set. The actor who plays Puddleglum is FANTASTIC! I remember watching him in Dr. Who as well, do any of you remember K-9 the robotic dog? lol But honestly, he does do a superb job in being a wet blanket! There are a few cheesy effects in this set, like the scene where Prince Rilian kills the serpent witch, it's SO obviously a dummy. Also, some of the cartoons are a little lacking in imagination. But, I do know that these are BBC films and that there was no such thing as complicated computer animation in the early 80's. Back then, we had black screens with green writing on them and dot matrix printers! I remember using those things in grade school.

But anyways, all in all this is a great set! I'm so happy to be able to preserve some of my favorite movies from childhood on DVD and see them whole and clear again after all these years! The story is timeless, engaging and non-denominational! BUY THIS SET, you will NOT be disappointed! Also recommended are Rigoletto, The Rogue Stallion, Black Beauty and The Black Stallion (guess I don't really like cartoons!) Enjoy!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


143 of 156 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars StrangeHorizons.com Reviews Editor says:, October 30, 2002
By 
Auros (San Mateo, CA) - See all my reviews
A number of years back, the BBC produced this television version of four of C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. The books, of course, are Biblical allegory for children, but they are beloved of many a non-Christian fantasy fan (including me) because they are basically Good Stories. Furthermore, the ideals embraced by the allegory -- mercy, justice, bravery, concern for nature, intelligent contemplation of spirituality, and so on -- are hardly exclusive to Christianity. Lewis happened to believe that his theology was logically supportable, but you don't have to agree with him on that to see that he was fundamentally a good man, and that his concept of virtue is admirable in many respects.
The BBC series captures the innocence, the adventure, and the peculiarly British charm of the books. Also, much like Peter Jackson's new Lord of the Rings movies, it replaces lengthy expository text with beautiful scenery and intricately designed props, keeping the plot advancing steadily. Though there are some groan-worthy bits of melodramatic line delivery, the acting is overall quite good, and there is a standout performance by Tom Baker (known to many SF fans as the fourth Doctor Who) as Puddleglum the Marshwiggle in The Silver Chair. The only thing to complain about is that they never got to make the other three books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


59 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delicious Blend of the Real, the Near-Real and the Unreal., March 31, 2006
By 
Gary Fisher (West Michigan, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Let us begin by agreeing that computer-generated images have both added to and taken from filmmaking, in ways similar to the effect performance-enhancing drugs have had on sports. We might thrill at the modern athlete who hits the ball out of the park, but we still wonder how he'd compare to Babe Ruth.

This 1980s-era BBC production is in many ways superior to the more recent cinematic version of Lewis' great fantasy; in particular, a number of elements, both major and minute, which are altered or removed in the film are faithfully represented in the BBC video Chronicles. This is no unimportant detail -- the Chronicles of Narnia is first and foremost a story; anything C.S. Lewis included is probably significant and ought not to be left out or redefined at the whim of a Director. In producing these versions of four of the seven Chronicles the BBC was careful to tell the story without incautiously rewriting it.

The technology of the 1980s, and the budget constraints upon the BBC, do play their own role in these productions, of course. In particular, the recent film's seamless blurring of the line between humans and talking animals is simply beyond what could be done in the BBC version. While Aslan is very nearly equally realized in both the Disney and BBC productions, and the BBC's Tumnus is in some ways superior to (though certainly not "better than") Disney's, other characters do not fare as well. Beaver and his wife are almost embarassingly silly in the BBC version, and Maugrim's transitions border on the painful. Some of the peripheral characters are portrayed by beautifully but unrealistically drawn animations, and most of the "magic" could be duplicated or bettered today by a tenth-grade film class.

Nevertheless, these are matters not of substance but of presentation; the stories themselves are accurately presented in convincing settings by actors who range from highly competent to superbly skilled. Backgrounds and scenery are very well done, both interior and exterior, and distracting elements, such as those mentioned above, are kept to a minimum. The real, the nearly-real and the purely animated are delicately balanced.

The 3 disk set reviewed presents four of the Chronicles: "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe;" "Prince Caspian;" "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader;" and "The Silver Chair." Also included are a fascinating film about C.S. Lewis from the BBC's "Bookworm" TV magazine, trivia games, numerous stills from the productions and, perhaps most intriguing, a detailed recipe for Turkish Delight.

This set is best enjoyed by true lovers of C.S. Lewis and of the Chronicles, but those who fit that description would be glad to own it. My only true regret is that the missing Chronicles were not produced, but perhaps if this set is purchased in sufficient numbers that omission could eventually be corrected as well. I have no doubt one of the new generation of fans could someday do so; perhaps this set will start them on their way.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


46 of 49 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best TV adaptation yet!, July 1, 2003
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Well, the DVD set box arrived and it made my weekend! 20 years after reading the books, I am currently rereading them again, and following them up by watching the DVDs. I enjoyed the DVDs and so did my two sons aged 4 & 2. Well done to BBC for trying to faithfully adapt the books, even with the limited budget. Yes, the special effects are not always special, but pretty good for a television production back in the late 80s/early 90s. The animatronics of Aslan is convincing, especially his size. I hope this DVD production prompts the filmmakers who are planning to make a movie of the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe to produce something great. One surprise with the DVD set; having ordered it from North America, I thought I would not be able to play the DVDs on my Japanese (Region 2) DVD player, but, 'by Jove' it did! So maybe it is a 'Region Free' DVD. One disappointment: Maybe it was my DVD player/amp but the mono sound did not play very well on my system, with the dialogue often hard to hear. But the biggest disappointment maybe that not all 7 books were visualized by the BBC. Maybe one day! Also very good packaging, menus, special features, and liner notes!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Chronicling "Narnia", August 12, 2005
A new big-screen adaptation of the Narnia Chronicles is currently in the works, to fill the gap that "Lord of the Rings" left behind. But it isn't the first adaptation of C.S. Lewis's classic fantasies -- in the 1980s, the BBC made their own adaptation.

"The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe" introduces us to the Pevensie kids, four teenagers who are staying in the country during World War II. But during a game of hide-and-seek, Lucy (Sophie Wilcox) hides in a wardrobe -- and finds that the back opens into a snowy forest land, populated by mythic creatures. It's the land of Narnia, where the Pevensies are destined to become kings and queens -- if they can destroy the evil White Witch (Barbara Kellerman), with the return of lion messiah Aslan (Ronald Pickup).

"Prince Caspian and the Voyage of the Dawn Treader" takes us forward a few years -- and centuries in Narnia. Warlike humans have invaded Narnia and driven the talking animals, centaurs, dryads and others into hiding. But young Prince Caspian (Jean Marc Perret) believes in them, and joins them to defeat his usurping uncle Miraz. And the Pevensies are called from their world to help.

No sooner have Edmund (Jonathan R. Scott) and Lucy finished one adventure than other begins: while arguing with obnoxious cousin Eustace (David Thwaites), they are sucked into a painting and land beside the Narnian ship Dawn Treader. It also happens to be Caspian's ship. The three kids accompany the young king through a sea of horrors, slavers and magicians, right to the edge of the world...

The newly reformed Eustance takes center stage in "The Silver Chair." At his chaotic school, he confides to a bullied classmate, Jill Pole (Camilla Power), about Narnia -- and the two of them find themselves whisked there by Aslan. Aslan gives them a quest: Find the aged Caspian's missing son Rilian (Richard Henders), who was seduced away by a malevolent witch. Eustace and Jill reluctantly go, and soon find themselves enmeshed in a plan to conquer all of Narnia.

The BBC has been known to make adaptations of countless books, so it's not surprising that they tried to tackle the Chronicles of Narnia. The result is a mixed bag, with some bad acting and sketchy CGI, but still a satisfying fantasy series with some truly creepy, uplifting or just interesting.

Expect a very faithful adaptation -- the BBC preserved virtually every character, most of the scenes, and all the Christian allegory of Lewis' books. As a result, there are some truly chilling and magical scenes, like Eustace's transformations and the battles with Miraz's armies. The settings are magnificent, especially the giant "Dawn Treader" and Caer Paravel.

Unfortunately, it does have its bad points. Some of the special effects are quite dated, including some early blue-screen effects that are almost convincing, but not quite. Costumes are very very Dungeons and Dragons, especially Miraz and his army. And Aslan is played by a large and almost realistic puppet, except he looks like he has arthritis and lots of Botox.

The acting tends to be on the understated good side -- Scott and Thwaites give the best performances, especially since they both play obnoxious twits who have to learn the error of their ways. Entertaining supporting characters abound, like Big Mick (I swear that's his name), both Caspians, Jeffrey Perry, and Warwick Davis (in owl and mouse costumes). The only sour notes are Wilcox and Kellerman; one whines, one cackles like a hammy banshee.

Those anticipating the return of Aslan and the Pevensies in December should check out the BBC movies. While some parts have not aged well over the last twenty years, they are still solid enough to enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First, The Original, The Best, December 12, 2005
These four movies are the first four books written by C.S.Lewis. No they do not have massive special effects, no they are not going to equal the massive epicness of Lord of the Rings. But they have something that the new version of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe lacks: emotions. The BBC version of the books more accuratly follows the story, and actually manages to bring the emotions in the book to life. It has a wonderful story, for either your religious or not religious aspects.

If your after vibrant special effects, current hollywood standards, or a short movie, then no: The BBC version is not for you. But if your after an accurate story, envoking real human emotions and portrals of children who should be mentors and examples to your own, then this is the box set for you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent adaptions of C.S. Lewis' classic books., June 27, 2008
Nearly twenty years before Andrew Adamson and Walden Media began bringing the Narnia novels to the big screen, the British Broadcasting Corporation produced made-for-television adaptations of four of C.S. Lewis' classic books. These productions have been released to the DVD market a couple of times before, but now they have been digitally remastered for this most recent reissue.
All four productions were adapted for television by writer Alan Seymour and produced by Paul Stone. The programs were originally broadcast in a serial format of episodes running about twenty-five to thirty minutes each. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and The Silver Chair each ran six episodes long. Prince Caspian was the shortest series at just two episodes, while The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was a four-part adventure. However, the programs have been edited together as feature-length "movies" for DVD.

Disc One: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1988) The adventure begins as LWW introduces us to the Pevensie children--Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy--who are sent to stay at the home of Professor Digory Kirke during World War II. While exploring the house, Lucy (Sophie Wilcox) discovers a wardrobe. She steps inside the wardrobe and finds herself transported into a land of mythical creatures. Here Lucy and her siblings--Peter (Richard Dempsey), Susan (Sophie Cook) and Edmund (Jonathan R. Scott--are drawn into the battle to liberate Narnia from the White Witch (Barbara Kellerman) who holds the land in a perpetual winter. The Pevensies meet Aslan (voiced by Ronald Pickup), the lion god/king of Narnia, who leads them into battle against the Witch and her evil minions.

Disc Two: Prince Caspian and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (both 1989) These two adaptations can either be watched separately or run together as a single feature. In Prince Caspian, the Pevensies are drawn back to Narnia where they discover many centuries have passed since their previous visit. The creatures of Narnia have been driven from the land, which has been conquered by humans. They find they have been summoned by Prince Caspian (Jean-Marc Perret), the rightful ruler of Narnia. Caspian's uncle, King Miraz, seized the throne after murdering the prince's father, and now seeks to kill Caspian himself. The Pevensies join forces with the prince and the exiled creatures of Narnia to defeat Miraz.
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader finds Edmund and Lucy returning to Narnia once again, this time with their priggish cousin Eustace (David Thwaites). Here, they are reunited with Caspian, now a young man and King of Narnia. The king has set sail in search of seven lords who had been driven from the land years ago by Caspian's uncle, King Miraz. The truly remarkable thing about this story is the transformation of the Pevensies' cousin. In the beginning, Eustace is spoiled, bratty, whiny and very obnoxious. By the end, he has matured greatly, thinking of others before himself.

Disc Three: The Silver Chair (1990) This is my favorite of the whole set. Eustace Scrubb moves to center stage in this story as he returns to Narnia without his cousins. He is accompanied, however, by Jill Pole (Camilla Power), a bullied classmate from school. Aslan sends Eustace and Jill on a mission to find Prince Rilian (Richard Henders), the missing son of the aging King Caspian. The two are joined in their quest by Puddleglum (Doctor Who's Tom Baker), a Marshwiggle who acts as their guide on their journey into North Narnia. Barbara Kellerman, the White Witch of LWW, returns as the Green Lady, who has lured Rilian into her plan to seize control of Narnia.

Actor Warwick Davis (Willow, the Star Wars saga, the Harry Potter films) plays Reepicheep, a talking mouse in both Prince Caspian and TVOTDT. He also portrays Glimfeather, an owl in The Silver Chair. Davis also played Nikabrik the dwarf in the recent big screen adaptation of Prince Caspian, making him the only actor to appear in both the BBC and Walden Media adaptations of the Narnia books.
Please keep in mind that these adaptations were produced during the late 1980's and the beginning of the 90's, and they reflect the BBC production values of that time. If you love the CGI effects of the big screen counterparts, you may be disappointed with these versions. The effects in these programs are more in the order of 70's and 80's Doctor Who. But what they lack in terms of effects they more than make up for in quality writing, as Alan Seymour's scripts remain faithful to C.S. Lewis' books, and the Christian themes of Lewis' stories remain intact in their TV versions.
My only real complaint about these DVD releases is the lack of any bonus features. It would have been nice to have seen some featurettes or documentaries included as well as a commentary track. Hopefully BBC Video will one day issue a special edition DVD set with some features. But I am pleased that these versions have been remastered, and I believe that fans of C.S. Lewis classic Narnia books will enjoy these made-for-TV adaptations as much as their big screen counterparts, perhaps even more so.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nostaliga, June 13, 2005
By 
Dana Armstrong (Louisville, KY USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
First the obvious pitfalls of an older television miniseries...

Yes, the children actors are a bit stilted, yes, lucy is a chubby little brunette and not a little blonde tyke, yes the props are low, low budget and the people in animal suits are particularly reminiscent of old Japanese Godzilla movies...

HOWEVER...

CHILDREN won't ever notice, and pessimistic, cinematically spoiled adults can too if you can forgo nitpicking the detials that are not those of the CG variety of blockbuster Hollywood mega-flicks and look beyond the visual to the stories.

I've probably read the books 20 times since my early childhood. I drag them all out every few years and have a good trip down memory lane and every time I read them, I see something else I missed the last time.

This BBC adaption (Like MOST BBC miniseries) are utterly faithful to the books. I read few of the other reviews and anyone who can claim that the BBC contracdicts a very british author in this adaption needs to read the books again.

The BBC has always been very faithful to books, it's practically their signature hallmark when doing miniseries to literature...

I wish and Hope Hollywood stays as true when this hits the big screen this summer.

I'd recommend anyone get these first and watch them. (BEFORE you see the Hollywood Version and After you read the books mind you. C.S. Lewis is worth it folks. Read them to your kids!!)

Christian or Not.

That's not the point.

The morals of these stories transcend religious boundaries to a spiritual level.

It's magic, pure and simple for all ages!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Chroncling Narnia, January 26, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The Chronicles of Narnia are apparently the new big fantasy movie series, with the second film "Prince Caspian" coming out this spring.

But it isn't the first time that C.S. Lewis' classic fantasies have been adapted -- in the 1980s, the BBC made their own adaptation of the first four adventures of the Pevensies and their relatives. Some of the actors and special effects are frankly lacking, but mostly they are just solid storytelling.

"The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe" introduces us to the Pevensie kids, four teenagers who are staying in the country during World War II. But during a game of hide-and-seek, Lucy (Sophie Wilcox) hides in a wardrobe -- and finds that the back opens into a snowy forest land, populated by mythic creatures. It's the land of Narnia, where the Pevensies are destined to become kings and queens -- if they can destroy the evil White Witch (Barbara Kellerman), with the return of lion messiah Aslan (Ronald Pickup).

"Prince Caspian and the Voyage of the Dawn Treader" takes us forward a few years -- and centuries in Narnia. Warlike humans have invaded Narnia and driven the talking animals, centaurs, dryads and others into hiding. But young Prince Caspian (Jean Marc Perret) believes in them, and joins them to defeat his usurping uncle Miraz. And the Pevensies are called from their world to help.

No sooner have Edmund (Jonathan R. Scott) and Lucy finished one adventure than other begins: while arguing with obnoxious cousin Eustace (David Thwaites), they are sucked into a painting and land beside the Narnian ship Dawn Treader. It also happens to be Caspian's ship. The three kids accompany the young king through a sea of horrors, dragons, gold springs, slavers and magicians, right to the edge of the world...

The newly reformed Eustance takes center stage in "The Silver Chair." At his chaotic school, he confides to a bullied classmate, Jill Pole (Camilla Power), about Narnia -- and the two of them find themselves whisked there by Aslan. Aslan gives them a quest: Find the aged Caspian's missing son Rilian (Richard Henders), who was seduced away by a malevolent witch. Eustace and Jill reluctantly go, and soon find themselves enmeshed in a plan to conquer all of Narnia.

The BBC has been known to make adaptations of countless books, so it's not surprising that they tried to tackle the Chronicles of Narnia. The result is a mixed bag, with some bad acting and sketchy CGI, but still a satisfying fantasy series with some truly creepy, uplifting or just interesting.

Expect a very faithful adaptation -- the BBC preserved virtually every character, most of the scenes, and all the Christian allegory of Lewis' books. As a result, there are some truly chilling and magical scenes, like Eustace's transformations and the owl conference. The settings are magnificent, especially the giant "Dawn Treader" and Caer Paravel.

Unfortunately, it does have its bad points, mostly in the tedium that is "Prince Caspian." Some of the special effects are quite dated, including some early blue-screen effects that are almost convincing, but not quite. Costumes are very very Dungeons and Dragons, especially Miraz and his army -- very Ye Olde Batmanne. And Aslan is played by a large and almost realistic puppet, except he looks like he has arthritis and large quantities of Botox.

The acting is a mixed bag -- Scott and Thwaites give the best performances, especially since they both play obnoxious little pains who have to learn the error of their ways. And there are loads of entertaining supporting characters, like Big Mick (I swear that's his name), both Caspians, Jeffrey Perry, and Warwick Davis (in owl and mouse costumes). The only sour notes are Wilcox and Kellerman; one whines, one cackles and screeches like a hammy banshee.

Those anticipating the return of Aslan and the Pevensies should check out the BBC adaptations -- while they have some big flaws, they are still entertaining enough to enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why it's better than the new movie, November 26, 2006
Yes, the visual effects are primitive, but the production is so thoughtful and earnest that it hardly matters. I mean the BBC in the late '80's didn't have the technology for good visual effects. What did you expect?

Also, what's not to like about the casting? The only character I can think of who was arguably better cast in the new movie was Lucy, but BOTH Lucys were extraordinary child actresses. There are people saying Lucy doesn't look the part in this adaptation... true, she's not movie-star cute, but does she have to be? I think she looks a little too grown up, but she acts the part so well you almost don't notice. The other children are superbly cast. They chose a perfect Susan, better cast than the Susan in the new version (although she wasn't bad). Peter is also a lot better in this... I don't think the 2005 filmmakers got a handle on his quite uniquely British character.

But enough of defending this TV adaptation. The makers of the new movie should be the ones on the defensive. There are aspects of this series that the new movie can't even come near. The acting is brilliant and nuanced; all the more impressive coming from children. The White Witch may have over-acted a bit in this TV version, but Tilda Swinton has such a pared-down part in the new movie, it's hard to argue with any certainty that her understated performance was any better. The pacing is perfect in the BBC version. You don't see any of the maudlin crap that Disney puts into the new version, like the ten-minute scene of the kids boarding the train in London and crying as they leave their mummy. It's faithful to the books, not omitting or (what's more annoying) ADDING anything in the plot. At over two hours, the Disney movie could have included most of the book's dialog and dispensed with the overdone, overlong CGI battle scenes, and with adding its own minor characters (ex: the fox).

The music in this adaptation is also SUPERB. It's some of the best theme music I've ever heard for a small- or big-screen production.

You can say the battle scenes were more believeable in the new one, and that the witch's CGI army beats the embarrassing cut-and-paste animations, and costumed actor animals seen in the BBC adaptation. But NOWHERE does the movie create the level of suspense you see in Peter's fight with the wolf in the BBC adaptation. Yes, the wolf was obviously an actor in a costume. But seeing him toss Peter around, and with Peter looking like he was really getting hurt and genuinely scared, it was an incredibly frightening and well-directed scene.

Also, I have nothing bad to say about Liam Neeson, but I couldn't bring myself to believe an Aslan with an American accent in the new version. Neeson has been in the U.S. a long time, and he does an American accent better than an Englih one. I guess the filmmakers thought it would be too ridiculous to have an Irish-sounding Aslan, so they directed him to sound American, and frankly, it doesnt' work. Ronald Pickup's voice makes much more sense for this part.

I suppose if you didn't know what to expect, the shoddy special effects in this version might ruin it for you. But if you appreciate the ways this adaptation beats the movie, you'll be able to see past the visual effects, and you'll be glad you took the time. Makes me wish the BBC directors had just had the same CGI technology to use when they made this... with better visuals, it would be perfect.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 231 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.