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Chuang Tsu: Inner Chapters, a Companion to Tao Te Ching Paperback – February 18, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Amber Lotus; 35th anniversary ed edition (February 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1602371172
  • ISBN-13: 978-1602371170
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 8.4 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #555,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By applewood on June 25, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Now I am going to tell you something. I don't know what heading it comes under, and whether or not it is relevant here, but it must be relevant at some point. It is not anything new, but I would like to say it.

There is a beginning. There is no beginning of that beginning. There is no beginning of that no beginning of beginning. There is something. There is nothing. There is something before the beginning of something and nothing, and something before that. Suddenly there is something and nothing. But between something and nothing, I still don't really know which is something and which is nothing. Now, I've just said something, but I don't really know whether I've said anything or not.

There is nothing in the world greater than the tip of a bird's feather, and Mount Tai is small. None have lived longer than a dead child, and old Peng Tsu died young. Heaven and earth grow together with me, and the ten thousand things and I are one. We are already one - what else is there to say? Yet I have just said that we are one, so my words exist also. The one and what I said about the one make two, and two and one make three. Thus it goes on and on. Even a skilled mathematician cannot reach the end, much less an ordinary person. If we proceed from nothing to something, we reach three. How much farther would it be going from something to something? Enough. Let us stop." (Chuang Tsu, Chapter 2, pg 35)

The court jester of heaven and earth, Chinese Coyote, Zero the Hero, a glimpse through the abandoned mind of a mystic, timeless and timely, Chuang Tsu is a delight; light as a feather, as grounded as a mountain...simple and knowable, yet indescribable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tom rybus on July 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'd read Chuang Tzu (the Burton Watson translation, I think) when I was in college in the late sixties. As a young adult, I found the ideas expressed in Taoism to be fascinating, appealing, yet very hard to understand. Now in my mid-sixties I wanted to re-read Chuang Tzu, this time the Gia-Fu Feng translation. My reaction, in general, is similar to what it was 45 years ago. Fascinating, appealing, paradoxical. The book deserves yet another reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John E. Patton on May 1, 2013
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New cover-- contents reveal the relationship and responsibilities we each have as oppertunities in our life. The next stage of Taoest thought and exploration.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Steven H. Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on August 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
The introduction to this book states, "Very little is known about Chuang Tsu and that little is inextricably woven into legend. It is said that he was a contemporary of Mencius ... around the fourth century B.C. Chuang Tsu was to Lao Tsu as Saint Paul was to Jesus and Plato to Socrates... The seven 'Inner Chapters' presented in this translation are accepted by scholars as being definitely the work of Chuang Tsu."

Here are some quotations from the book (NOTE: Page numbers refer to the 165-page 1974 Vintage Books edition)

"Joy and anger, sorrow and happiness, hope and fear, indecision and strength, humility and willfulness, enthusiasm and insolence, like music sounding from an empty reed or mushrooms rising from the warm dark earth, continually appear before us day and night. No one knows whence they come. Don't worry about it! Let them be! How can we understand it all in one day?" (Pg. 22)
"When there is no more separation between 'this' and 'that,' it is called the still-point of Tao. At the still-point in the center of the circle one can see the infinite in all things." (Pg. 29)
"The perfect man is spiritual. Though the great swamp burns, he will not feel the heat. Though the great rivers freeze, he will not feel the cold. Though thunderbolts split the mountains and gales shake the sea, he will have no fear. Such a man can ride the clouds and mist, mount the sun and moon, and wander beyond the four seas. Life and death do not affect him. How much less will he be concerned with good and evil!" (Pg. 40)
"Once upon a time, I, Chuang Tsu, dreamed I was a butterfly flying happily here and there, enjoying life without knowing who I was. Suddenly I woke up and I was indeed Chuang Tsu.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Madden on September 23, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an absolutely beautiful book! The words and pictures, combined together, make for a very interesting read.
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