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Cinder Edna Paperback – September 24, 1998


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Reprint edition (September 24, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688162959
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688162955
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.2 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,117 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Instead of glass slippers, Cinderella's neighbor Cinder Edna wears comfortable penny loafers to the ball, where she falls in love with the prince's goofy, tender-hearted younger brother. "Full of kid-pleasing jokes," said PW. Ages 5-up.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3-This clever, double story follows the fates of two young women. Readers know Cinderella, who works all day, sits in the cinders, and needs her fairy godmother to get the ball moving. But Cinder Edna next door has used her spare time to learn 16 different ways to make tuna casserole and to play the accordian. She earns money by cleaning out parrot cages and mowing lawns, and can she tell jokes. When the dance is announced, she dons the dress she bought on layaway, takes the bus to the ball, and wears loafers for dancing. She wins the attention of Prince Randolph's younger but dorky brother, Rupert, who loves to dance and tell jokes, and runs the palace recycling plant. Both women dash off at the stroke of midnight. The two princes' plans for finding the owners of the lost glass slipper and the beat-up loafer are a hilarious contrast. Ella ends up, of course, with the vain, boorish Randolph. Edna moves into a solar-heated cottage, caring for orphaned kittens and playing duets with her husband Rupert. O'Malley's full-page, full-color illustrations are exuberant and funny. Ella is suitably bubble-headed and self-absorbed while Edna is plain, practical, and bound to enjoy life. Kids will love this version of the familiar story for its humor and vibrant artwork. Buy two copies-one to circulate and the other to hoard for story hours.
Susan Hepler, Alexandria City Public Schools, VA
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

I read it to my 4-year old daughter and she loved it.
Elizabeth Thompson
Rather dangerous messages to pass on to young girls, especially today... This is why I love "Cinder Edna" so much.
Kenya Starflight
Being a big-footed mother of a big-footed young daughter, we both enjoyed this fun story.
Cynthia Kremsner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Bianca Starr on March 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
I am a teenager and I read this book as part of an assignment in class. The book of Cinder Edna shows the plasticy-type "teenager," with a perfect, paper thin look, versus the homely, sensible girl with character. Cinderella marries the prince and has to sit through royal meetings and all of that, and Cinder Edna gets to marry the not-so-handsome prince and live happily. and have fun.

Any teen like me who ISNT one of the pretty or popular girls will get a boost of self-esteem when they read this book. I would reccomend this book to be in psychologist's offices and anorexic hospitals and the like ALL OVER THE COUNTRY.

I loved Cinder Edna. Your child will too.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Marilyn McQuade on October 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Sure, there are plenty of retellings and variations on "Cinderella", but this one takes the cake. It compares the fates of TWO victims of cruel stepmothers and wicked stepsisters. Bringing the story up to date gives it a deliciously anachronistic feel, and the narrative pokes some sly and well-deserved fun at the original. The hilarious illustrations enhance the text perfectly. Don't let the fact that "Cinder Edna" is aimed at young children keep you away. This is one of the funniest and cleverest books to come along in a long time.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By W. Cunningham on November 2, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a teacher, and I bought this book for my 3rd grade class when we were doing a unit on Cinderella. This is a fabulous take on the classic story, updated wonderfully. But some of the ideas had to be explained to my children because it was a lot to take in. They didn't get some of the jokes. In the end, I think that most of them got the general idea. The moral is a great lesson for kids these days.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Judy K. Polhemus TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 13, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the story of two neighbors, both overworked sisters to mean, wicked, old step-sisters. Cinderella is the pretty one who sits in the cinders and daydreams after she finishes her chores. Next door Cinder Edna, the spunky one but not so pretty, sings while she works. She doesn't like sitting in cinders--gets her clothes sooty--so she takes on extra chores from the neighbors who pay her, enabling her to put a lovely dress on lay-away, her just-in-case dress.

One day the two princes announce a big ball and invite all the women of the kingdom to attend. The six wicked sisters ready themselves through the help of the abused step-sisters. Cinderella's fairy godmother comes along to poof the pretty lass ready. Cinderella's lack of imagination, lack of spunk, lack of proper attitude cannot see a way to the ball. GM has to turn a pumpkin, you know the rest.

Meanwhile, Cinder Edna gets her dress off lay-away, decides to wear her comfortable loafers to dance in, and takes the bus to the ball. There is no effort except her own good attitude. At the ball she finds the handsome prince too stuffed full of himself. Boring, she decides of him. Then she meets Rupert, the younger prince, head of waste recycling and keeper of orphaned kittens and master joke teller. She is known to tell a joke or two herself. They dance the night away.

All good stories must come to an end. The usual hunt for the right foot for the glass slipper, and a woman who can recite 17 tuna casserole recipes play a major role. There is a double wedding (surely this is not a spoiler!). But the big question is: Which couple lives happily ever after?
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Cynthia Kremsner on March 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
What a refreshing retelling of an old tale, especially for todays young girls. Being a big-footed mother of a big-footed young daughter, we both enjoyed this fun story. Cinder-Edna doesn't wine around about all that has been bestowed upon her. Instead, she makes the best of the situation and takes matters into her own hands. Spunky and spry, Edna ends up living happily ever after while beautiful Cinderalla lives with her beautiful husband in beautifully boring bliss!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A. Woodley on February 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
I Loved this book, and so did my two pre-schoolers. It is a great retelling of Cinderella with a modern slant. Cinder Edna and Cinderella are neighbours. While Cinderella pines away and sleeps in the Cinders to keep warm, Edna finds it too dirty and so after she does the work for HER wicked step-mother and step sisters she goes out and cleans bird cages and mows lawns.

Cinder Edna is a spunky, fun character - while Cinderella can't get to the ball without her fairy god-mother's help Cinder Edna has organised a dress on Layaway and catches the bus and while there have been discussions I see on here about feminist overtones and environmental issues (all of which are here) the thing I liked most about this is that people really need to earn what they get. We end up rewarded for what we put in. So Cinder Edna and Cinderella really end up with exactly what they put in. I like the concept of consequences and planning.

Anyway, this book makes me laugh. some of the lines are priceless - and my kids adore the story so it works well on both adult and child level

The illustrations are quite neat - I think they much be pastel, and they have a wonderful 50's kitsch feel about them - the step-mother and step-sisters are extraodinary!

I would really recommend this book, it left me with the same feeling the PaperBag Princess did - A real spunky heroine who can look after herself.

There are some utterly classic lines in this book
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