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Cinema Europe - The Other Hollywood


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Product Details

  • Actors: Kenneth Branagh, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Sidney Gilliat, Marie Glory, Peter Hopkinson
  • Format: Black & White, Color, NTSC
  • Language: Danish, English, French, German, Italian, Swedish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Image Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: May 30, 2000
  • Run Time: 360 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305837171
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #299,137 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Cinema Europe - The Other Hollywood" on IMDb

Special Features

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Editorial Reviews

Where the art of filmmaking all began. An exciting visual presentation of the European silent film era, "Cinema Europe: The Other Hollywood" commemorates the birth of an art that would transform the 20th century. This stylish and historical documentary focuses on the early days of the movie industry and the enormous contribution made by Europe. Included is rarely seen footage from early movies and interviews with some of the film industry's pioneers. This fascinating documentary is produced by the award-winning team of Kevin Brownlow and David Gill and serves as a companion to their definitive "Hollywood" series. This six-hour series is narrated by critically acclaimed actor/director Kenneth Branagh with music composition by Carl Davis, Philip Appleby and Nic Raine. Part I: Where It all Began (Introductory Episode). Part II: Promised Land (Sweden). Part III: The Unchained Camera (Germany). Part IV: The Music of Light (France). Part V: Opportunity Lost (Britain). Part VI: End Of An Era (Finale). "Enlightens as it beguiles...with footage seldom, if ever, seen." Variety

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
This is a must for anyone interested in silent films or the origins of the cinema.
Karen Weber
A documentary or commentary track about how these clips were found, etc., would have been wonderful.
audrey
Its filled with excerpts from both classic and less well known films from this genre.
A. Ranusch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 9, 2002
Format: DVD
Brownlow & Gill's documentary series was originally broadcast in 1996 by the BBC to celebrate 100 years of cinema. Not only is it incredibly interesting as a history lesson but top marks must go to the archive researchers who have dug up some incredibly rare footage (such as Dietrich's screen test for THE BLUE ANGEL). All 6 episodes are on this 1 disc and although there are no extras, you do get 6 hours of pure magic, masterly narrated by the excellent Kenneth Branagh. The quality of the archive footage is amazing and anyone contemplating studying film for education or academic reasons really should start with this disc, for it starts with footage circa 1895 (including the Lumiere bros) through to the advent of sound over 30 years later. It's all very well to read about this stuff in textbooks but seeing it on your TV really does make a difference. It is truly amazing just how much stuff has survived considering the time that has elapsed and the chemical volatility of early nitrate film stock. All in all this is well worth watching, masterfully put together and nicely presented. It is also worth noting that contrary to the technical information on the page, this disc is in fact not region coded so will play in any DVD player in any country so you really have no excuse not to get it (however the U.S. appears to be the only country where this series is available as a DVD).This disc is must for any film student or historian!.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By audrey TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 11, 2002
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
If you are interested in film and want to learn more about the early days, you will be enthralled, from start to finish, by this remarkable six-hour documentary, the last joint project by film historians Kevin Brownlow and David Gill. Intelligently written and wonderfully narrated by Kenneth Branagh, each hour is filled with rare film clips and fantastic interviews.
The only weakness here is a lack of extras. A documentary or commentary track about how these clips were found, etc., would have been wonderful. Also, a documentary package like this would be made even more valuable with the addition of a comprehensive index of the actors and films.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Edwin Graf Diemer on October 14, 2000
Format: DVD
Kevin Brownlow and David Gill created wonderful documentaries together, and this, their last work together is no exception! Amazing archival footage and lively narration that will make the most jaded film buff salivate. The only problem here is omission-the pair wanted to make this a 13-hour epic like their "Hollywood" (wonderful!), but were forced to do it in 6. For example, Russian silents are hardly mentioned. But what is here is astounding.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John Warthen on December 16, 2000
Format: DVD
This is the best documentary on early film I have ever seen-- a wonderful documentation of the parallel film-industries in the major European countries, but beyond that, a lush, transporting showcase for silent film restored to a state so like new as to make no difference. My favorite was the Swedish segment, since these films were entirely unseen by me-- Sjostrom and Stiller filmed native landscapes voraciously, and with immediate apprehension of the screen's epic essence. But Brownlow, as useful a fanatic as film studies contains, lets his footage do his arguing, in support of his belief that the first three decades of film-making contained its greatest achievements. If you've never applauded a videotape you were watching alone, this could be your initiation.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. Ranusch on May 28, 2000
Format: DVD
I saw this series when it first appeared on television on TCM. Its filled with excerpts from both classic and less well known films from this genre. The commentary by Branagh is both well informed and interesting. I highly recommend it to all lovers of world cinema.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Karen Weber on March 12, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Why is it that the British always produce the best silent film documentaries? Thames Television produced the best documentary ever on American silent films, "Hollywood: A celebration of the American silent film," and now Great Britain has followed that with the equally fine "Cinema Europe: The other Hollywood." The British obviously have the best grasp of film history, or at least know all the best people to consult. This is ultimately an international effort, created with the active cooperation of film historians and archives from around the world.
This is a brilliant and well-organized piece of work. It's broken down by different countries and their respective specialties; I found the episodes dealing with French, German, and Swedish films to be especially interesting. (I agree with another viewer, however, that Russia's exclusion is puzzling). The French section convinced me that I had to see Abel Gance's "Napoleon," and I'm extremely glad that I did. It's one of the most astonishing and passionate films I've seen to date, a true eye-opener.
Like the "Hollywood..." documentary, this one features great film clips and interviews with people who were instrumental in the making of many of these films.
This is a must for anyone interested in silent films or the origins of the cinema. This was such a marvelous, exciting period in which everything was new and few things were viewed as impossible, so experimentation and creativity flourished. The multiculturalism of the film industry back then is sorely missing today (since foreign accents didn't matter in silent films, casts and crews were often multinational). This documentary does a fine job of recapturing that heady sense of exhilaration, the international sharing of ideas, and the pioneering spirit. It's a gem!
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