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Cinema Treasures: A New Look at Classic Movie Theaters Hardcover – October 15, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: MBI; First edition (October 15, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760314926
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760314920
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 10.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,452,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Handsomely produced and extensively illustrated, Cinema Treasures is detailed without being dull and thoroughly at home with this often neglected subject matter." - Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

"This beautiful book offers a lively history of movie theaters in America, an impressive array of photos and memorabilia, and a heartening survey of the landmarks in our midst." - Leonard Maltin

"An arresting tome as it lays out the remarkable history of theatrical motion picture exhibition. This is one title I will revisit again and again." - Tim Ferrante, Videoscope

More About the Author

Ross Melnick is Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies at University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of "American Showman: Samuel 'Roxy' Rothafel and the Birth of the Entertainment Industry" (2012) and is the co-author of "Cinema Treasures" (2004), winner of the 2004 Book of the Year award from the Theatre Historical Society. His articles on film and media history have appeared in journals such as Film History and The Moving Image.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 11 customer reviews
This book is a must for every movie treasure fan.
Stanley G. Gilmore
Movie going was meant to be an experience out of the ordinary.
M. Fields
I found the book to be well researched and very descriptive.
Greg Treadway

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By James H. Rankin on October 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Review of CINEMA TREASURES, October, 2004 by James H. Rankin
It is always a pleasure to welcome any significant contribution to the weal of theatrical lore, and the 208-page volume "Cinema Treasures: A New Look at Classic Movie Theatres" by Ross Melnick and Andreas Fuchs, is certainly a fine 'treasure' of a chronicle of the architectural treasures this book so well covers. In fact, it is really two books in one, for it is first a meticulously researched survey of the eras of movie exhibition, and secondly a series of capsule descriptions of 30 notable examples of those cinema treasures still operating. The two young men who bring us this handsome, hardbound volume reflect some 35 years between them of theatre research and operation, and thus their heartfelt devotion to the genre is sincere, accurately related, and enthusiastically delivered. The quality of prose shows skill beyond their years.
The large book (12x10-1/2 inches) is printed on heavy, glossy paper within black cloth covers with only the spine stamped in gold, but the heavy paper jacket over it is a fitting cover since its full front color image behind the title is of the Grand Lake Theatre of Oakland, California, and this alone warrants one applying a plastic film wrap in order to protect it. The image there shows the auditorium of one of the survivors of the glorious days of the movie palace and ironically shows on its stage a portion of the grand house curtain of the long-lost and lamented Fox Theatre once of San Francisco, and is thus a visual summation of the tumult of loss and survival of two significant theatres into our day. This sturdily bound coffee table book is heavy on illustrations with at least one visual on each page, and most are in color, but this is far more than a picture book!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By toserveman on December 2, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As the other lengthy reviews have noted, this is a very impressive addition to the world of movie palace research. The book has a beautiful cover, strong binding, and is printed on high-quality paper. This book should last a lifetime. And it is very well written. These authors know their subject.

My only complaint is the authors' choices regarding the theatres they chose to highlight. Obviously, they couldn't possibly please everyone, but there are some magnificent palaces still in existence that they chose to ignore in favor of some rather modest and relatively plain buildings. I thought for sure I'd find the Coronado in Rockford IL, or the Palace in Louisville KY, or the Majestic in San Antonio TX, to name just a few. Perhaps they only selected theatres whose main function is still the presentation of movies. That criterion, unfortunately, excludes a number of great movie palaces still standing for other reasons.

Regardless, this is an excellent book and should be purchased by anyone interested in theatre architecture. I wish some of the previous books on movie palaces were as well written and edited as this one.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By M. Fields on October 6, 2004
Format: Hardcover
You must have this book. If you are a serious movie buff, this book is a must have. So many of the grand old movie houses are gone now but this book brings them back to life. Cinema Treasures explains why we must rescue our remaining movie palaces. We lost so much arhcitectural history by tearing down these buildings. New movie houses don't begin to compare. Movie going was meant to be an experience out of the ordinary.

You can also learn about the different styles of theaters for differnt periods. If you remember your favorite movie palace, it may be here. This book covers 100 years of movie going and is named after the Cinema Treasures website which is well worth the visit if you have the time. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It's the next best thing to visiting the theaters of the past in person.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By James H. Rankin on October 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
It is always a pleasure to welcome any significant contribution to the weal of theatrical lore, and the 208-page volume "Cinema Treasures: A New Look at Classic Movie Theatres" by Ross Melnick and Andreas Fuchs, is certainly a fine 'treasure' of a chronicle of the architectural treasures this book so well covers. In fact, it is really two books in one, for it is first a meticulously researched survey of the eras of movie exhibition, and secondly a series of capsule descriptions of 30 notable examples of those cinema treasures still operating. The two young men who bring us this handsome, hardbound volume reflect more than 35 years between them of theatre research and operation, and thus their heartfelt devotion to the genre is sincere, accurately related, and enthusiastically delivered. The quality of prose shows skill beyond their years.

The large book (12x10-1/2 inches) is printed on heavy, glossy paper within black cloth covers with only the spine stamped in gold, but the heavy paper jacket over it is a fitting cover since its full front color image behind the title is of the Grand Lake Theatre of Oakland, California, and this alone warrants one applying a plastic film wrap in order to protect it. The image there shows the auditorium of one of the survivors of the glorious days of the movie palace and ironically shows on its stage a portion of the grand house curtain of the long-lost and lamented Fox Theatre once of San Francisco, and is thus a visual summation of the tumult of loss and survival of two significant theatres into our day. This sturdily bound coffee table book is heavy on illustrations with at least one visual on each page, and most are in color, but this is far more than a picture book!
Read more ›
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