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Circle of Three #9: Through the Veil Paperback – September 4, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Circle of Three (Book 9)
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen (September 4, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006447299X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064472999
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 3.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,422,746 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Barbara A. Bolek on January 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
With another great turning of the Wheel of the Year, Cooper, Kate and Annie continue to grow and change like the year itself. Cooper makes an important decision regarding the direction her music is taking her and new connections are made. She also is forced to deal with the unhappiness and uncertainty of her parents separation.
Kate continues to deal with the fallout from telling her parents she's studying Wicca. This story finds her under virtual house arrest with no privacy, her belongings are searched, magical tools get taken away, emails and phone calls are monitored and she's unable to attend Wicca class, see or talk to her Wiccan boyfriend Tyler, or see her friends outside of school. On top of all of that, she's forced to see a psychiatrist too...could things get any worse?! Thankfully, the mood is about to change.
But the focus of the story is on Annie. The wheel has now turned to the season of Samhain, the Witches New Year, when the veil separating the realm of the living and the realm of the dead is very thin. Annie is frightened and haunted by recurring dreams of her parents and the fire she accidentally started. She begins to hear their voices calling to her. She realizes that she must begin to deal with the guilt she's been harboring all these years concerning her parents untimely death. She starts by asking her aunt for a birthday gift to help her on her way to healing.
Bird continues to enchant with three down-to-earth teen characters, practicing the Craft of Wicca, much like it is practiced today. The story has a somewhat syrupy ending, but it does remind those who practice Wicca, of some of the emotional, profound or life-changing experiences that they themselves may have experienced on the Wiccan path.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Fisher TOP 1000 REVIEWER on June 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
"Through the Veil" is the ninth book in the "Circle of Three" series, which chronicles three teenagers' journey through a year-and-a-day of discovering and exploring Wicca. If you haven't yet come across these books, I suggest you stop reading now and head back to book number one "So Mote It Be", as the books are very closely tied together and it's near impossible to read them out of chronological order (which is annoying, but there you go).

The three girls are Kate, Cooper and Annie (the ex-popularity queen, the rebel and the nerd are their individual personalities in a nutshell) and in "Through the Veil" they are fast approaching Halloween - Samhain in the Wicca calendar. Samhain marks the thinning of the veils between the living and the dead, which is especially relevant for Annie considering her parents passed away when she was young.

This title deals mainly with Annie - she is approaching her sixteenth birthday, and has asked her aunt if she can take a visit to San Francisco for her present. She lived there with her parents before they were killed in a house fire that she accidently started. Now she's been having disturbing nightmares about them and seeks out a way to communicate with them. As such, a few Wiccan rituals are thrown in - a meeting with a physic, a circle taken place at Annie's old home, and the coven's Samhain celebration itself which involves some symbollic "role-playing" along the same lines as the events that took place in "What the Cards Said" and "In the Dreaming". Not that that's a bad thing - these gatherings are pretty much the only reason I keep reading these books.

Meanwhile Kate and Cooper are dealing with their own (less critical) problems.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
It was an accident that happened 10 years ago. Even though they are gone, Annie has never forgotten her parents. But as they approach Samhain, the day when the veil between the living and the dead is the thinnist, Annie wants to bring them back. But do they want to come back?
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