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  • Cisco-Linksys WVC54GC Wireless-G Internet Video Camera
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Cisco-Linksys WVC54GC Wireless-G Internet Video Camera

by Linksys

Available from these sellers.
  • Product Type - Internet Camera
  • Dimensions WxDxH - 3.54" x 1.46" x 4.02"
  • Weight - 0.29 lb.
  • Cabling Type - RJ-45
1 new from $79.99 2 used from $37.99

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Technical Details

  • Brand Name: Linksys
  • Model: WVC54GC
  • Item Package Quantity: 1
  • Warranty: 3 years limited

Product Details

Product Manual [2.35mb PDF]
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
  • ASIN: B0002V8KW2
  • Item model number: WVC54GC
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: March 8, 2005

Product Description

Product Description

The Linksys Compact Wireless-G Internet Video Camera sends live video through the Internet to a web browser anywhere in the world This compact, self-contained unit lets you keep track of your home, your kids, your workplace -- whatevers important to you. Unlike standard web cams that require an attached PC, the Internet Video Camera contains its own web server, so it can connect directly to a network, either over Wireless-G (802.11g) networking, or over 10/100 Ethernet cable. The advanced MPEG-4 video compression produces a high-quality, high-framerate, up to 320x240 video stream. The Compact Internet Video Cameras unique form-factor and wireless connectivity allows you to mount it on a wall nearly anywhere, or slip it into its included stand for desktop use.

From the Manufacturer

From the Manufacturer The Linksys Wireless-G Internet Video Camera sends live video with sound through the Internet to a web browser anywhere in the world! This compact, self-contained unit lets you keep track of your home, your kids, your workplace -- whatever's important to you.

Unlike standard "web cams" that require an attached PC, the Internet Video Camera contains its own web server, so it can connect directly to a network, either over Wireless-G (802.11g) networking, or over 10/100 Ethernet cable. The advanced MPEG-4 video compression produces a high-quality, high-framerate, up to 640x480 audio/video stream.

The Internet Video Camera's unique form-factor and wireless connectivity allows you to mount it on a wall nearly anywhere, or slip it into its included stand for desktop use. Once it's connected to your home network, you can "see what it sees" from any PC in the house, while the audio/video stream is secured from the outside world, hidden behind your Router. If you want the video to be visible from outside your home network, you can open an appropriate port on the Router, and then create password protected accounts to manage access to the camera, or leave it wide open for the world to see. The SoloLink domain service (trial sign-up included) lets you access your camera using an easy-to-remember "name", even if your home Internet connection uses a dynamic IP address.

You can also turn on Security Mode, which tells the camera to send a message with a short video attached to up to three email addresses whenever it detects motion in its field of view. You can then log onto the live video stream if the situation warrants. The included Viewer & Recorder utility lets you record the audio/video stream to your local hard drive, "live" or on a predetermined schedule.

Let the Linksys Wireless-G Internet Video Camera help you keep tabs on your world.

Features

  • Integrated web server - view from most web browsers
  • Access the camera from anywhere in the world via the Internet
  • Supports enhanced MPEG-4 compression
  • View video from your Wireless-G or wired ethernet network
  • Connect an external Microphone or use the Built-in microphone for audio monitoring
  • Easily identify your camera's IP address from the built-in LCD display
  • Includes easy to use Linksys Viewer & Recorder utility with Snapshot feature
  • Motion Detection and E-mail notification
  • Create a database for user authentication
  • Supports resolution of up to 640x480 pixels
  • Time Stamp & Text Overlay
  • Connect up to 4 users simultaneously
  • Supports Linksys SoloLink DDNS Service for dynamic IP connection
  • Multi-platform support - TCP/IP, SMTP (E-Mail), HTTP, DHCP
  • Windows-based Setup Wizard for easy setup
  • WEP encryption up to 128-bit

See a comparison diagram of the different wireless technologies.

Wireless networks are rapidly becoming more popular and coming down in price. Since they don't require cables, you can use the devices anywhere in an office or home, even out on the patio. There's no need to roll out an Ethernet network cable to each room of a house; you can network anywhere -- without wires. Outside of the home, wireless networking is available in hotspots at coffee shops, businesses, airports -- great when you're on the road and need to get some work done. For convenience, wireless networking is the answer.

What Wireless Standard is Right for Me?
Now that you've decided to create a wireless network, the next step is to figure out which wireless standard to use.

Basically, a standard is a set of specifications for a device. All devices that follow a specific standard share operating characteristics, such as the radio frequency used and maximum data transfer speed.

For wireless networking, there are three standards to choose from at this time:

  • 802.11b
  • 802.11a
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11a/g

To learn about the differences between the standards and select the right one for your network, click here for an easy-to-understand chart.

Customer Reviews

Yesterday, I spent close to three hours on the phone with various technical support and customer service people.
Tom Baker
Configuring your router: In your router's configuration, you should assign this device a fixed IP outside of the range of DHCP addresses.
Sabrina Veksler
At the point you'd be buying a discontinued product and they're not exactly known for their glowing support for existing products.
C. Schrecengost

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

94 of 95 people found the following review helpful By B. America on October 23, 2004
With a long history of many failed attempts at IP wireless cams, Linksys creates what others could not; one that works.

Configuration with WEP was pretty easy. It's a little temperamental with distance compared to the tolerances of other G devices, but it works. It does not react well to low light levels and tries to compensate via its own gain. If you are using this in a home without AMPLE light, expect a grainy picture.

Frame rate is about 20FPS and is annoying. The security feature works. It senses movement and mails a captured video file. With only 4 seconds at the medium setting, the video images were over 500Kb. This is not for a dial-up AOL user.

There is a remote viewing option that lets you use their web servers to hit your cam from anywhere. Of course expect to pay about $40 for two years access.
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140 of 148 people found the following review helpful By Robert Salita on December 28, 2004
Verified Purchase
Update: 28 March 2005: Comparing two web cameras. I originally bought the Linksys WVC54G and now have the Hawkings NC320W. Both are very good for senior monitoring purposes. I now prefer web cameras which use Java applets (NC320W) instead of ActiveX (WVC54G). There are situations and browsers that simply can't use ActiveX and thus can't display images. The quality of both web cams is suitable for senior monitoring. Expect image quality to fall off in low light. The WVC54G has a wider field of view. This can be important in situations where you'll have to buy two NC320W to see everything whereas only one WVC54G is needed. I am now using three NC320W and viewing using Firefox browser. Warning: setting up a router to handle multiple web cameras needs a near router expert. The NC320W may soon become obsoleted by the newer and cheaper HNC230G (not released as of this date). I recommend setting up the cameras using static IP addresses so power outages won't cause new addresses to be reassigned.

True Story. Everyday I check on mom to make sure she's ok. While on vacation in Australia, I tuned in at the very moment she fell off the couch in Chicago. Using Skype, I called the senior home to have someone help her get up. Although she could have slid over to the phone and called for assistance, the important thing is that I learned she falls and can't get up by herself, and she hasn't been telling us. The WVC54G works well for this application. I can even see which DVD she's watching. I had to open port 1024 to get it working so it's not plug and play. Once running, it has never gone down, very important. My only complaint is that the auto white balance isn't true. Colors and lighting are somewhat off.
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41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By C. Blakely on January 3, 2006
[EDIT]
Ok, 3 weeks after setting these cameras up, I do have a few negative comments. The cameras will sometimes spontaneously stop working. I haven't been able to figure out why. I'm on the other side of the country from them now so I can't physically see them. Eventually they come back online. All 3 are just sitting there plugged in, in an empty house.

The video is fairly choppy if sound is enabled, even at 320x240.

The lighting plays a huge role in the quality of the image - bright sunlight in a window makes the image almost unusable. The image is very poor in dim lighting as well.

The field of view is pretty narrow and there's nothing you can do about it - I wish there was a wide-angle option.

I wish the interface to the camera was editable, and that you could show multiple cameras on the same page.

Other than that, they cameras basically work as advertised, but I couldn't recommend them for anything other than a novelty because of the image quality concerns and the reliability issues. It's fairly cheap and is good for casual monitoring.
[/EDIT]

I just set up 3 of these for my father-in-law (all the kids gave them to him) in his vacation home. He wants to be able to check on the house when he's not there. They worked fine, as advertised, as long as I was careful and made sure I had the right firmware. This is how I did it, without using the setup CD (which is confusing and was unnecessary for my setup).

If you've got a Linksys router and you haven't messed with the IP ranges like someone else who posted has, it's really easy to do - the most important thing to do is set it up WIRED first! I plugged the included ethernet cable into the router and into the camera. Then I powered on the camera.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Sabrina Veksler on March 4, 2006
Hi, I noticed that a lot of people are having difficulty setting this product up. I just wanted to offer 4 pointers.

1: Configuring your router: In your router's configuration, you should assign this device a fixed IP outside of the range of DHCP addresses. This is so that, the next time you reboot your router or cable modem, DHCP doesn't assign the camera a different IP. Remember, DHCP hands out IPs on a first-come, first-serve basis unless you tell it otherwise. So, if you defined your router's DHCP to start with, let's say, 100, when you set up the camera, you can give it a fixed IP of 192.168.1.99 (or whatever) and know that it will persist.

2. Opening your port: Be sure to choose a port number greater than 1024. Also, check your port forwarding page before deciding so that you don't conflict with other applications/services you have installed. When you pick your port, enable it to forward TCP requests to the IP you've specified, in my example 192.168.1.99.

3. Accessing from outside: You will need the external IP address, which you can get from your router's status page. DON'T FORGET TO APPEND THE PORT NUMBER TO THE URL! That's a common mistake. If your public IP is 60.99.60.100, then your camera's URL would be [...] ://60.99.60.100:9999. NOTE: If, when you look at your router's status page, you're confused because your WAN (external) IP begins with 192.168, then the next step probably applies to you...

4. IF YOU USE VONAGE or some other VoIP, there's an EXTRA STEP! Don't forget that the Vonage box sits between your cable modem and your router, acting as its own little firewall. Not only do you need to open the port here too, but also this is where you'd go to obtain your external IP!
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