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Lost Cities and Ancient Mysteries of South America (Lost Cities Series) Paperback – October 1, 1986


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Product Details

  • Series: Lost Cities Series
  • Paperback: 375 pages
  • Publisher: Adventures Unlimited Press; 1st edition (October 1, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 093281302X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0932813022
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #657,232 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Fun book to read.
Rebecca K. Butler
To expand on the title of my review, I'd elaborate by saying this is perhaps the most poorly written and ineptly edited book I have ever read.
chilemery
I will say though that if you are an officer in the Grammar Police it will drive you crazy at times.
William Johnston

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By J. Williams on May 11, 2009
Format: Paperback
I had several issues with this book:
1. His writing is spine-tingling horrendous. The grammatical errors, typos, etc. litter the entire page. Pick a page from the book -- I promise you'll find an error.
2. The title of this book makes me laugh hysterically, because that is hardly what the book is about. Basically, the book was this continuous cycle of hitch hiking, meeting someone, finding a hotel (and listing all hotels and prices in that area), getting plastered, and having sex. The way he writes about the lost cities is just plain... well, corny. He'll start out talking about the beer in a certain city and then "suddenly" recall this article he read about the lost city close to there. Considering he doesn't even visit a majority of these cities, I hardly believe he's truly thinking about them while hammering down drinks.
3. HE DOESN'T EVEN GO TO MOST OF THE "LOST" CITIES. This, above all problems, is absolutely unexcuseable. He talks about them, yes. Visit them? No. I would say 40% of the book is talking about various articles and arguments he has read ABOUT the cities. While this is very helpful and interesting, I picked up the book to read about treks into the jungle looking for these lost cities -- not to read what other people have said about them. About 10% of the book consists of him actually at the lost cities, which even then, it's not his own thoughts, but his interpretations of other writers'/adventurers' arguments. The other 50% of the book consists of him hitch-hiking, having sex, getting drunk, getting mugged, talking about hotels (Because I care about the price of a run down hostel in some unheard of town of South America in the 1980's), and asking ignorant nobodies about their views of the lost cities.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Ian Vance on August 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
Through the high altitude ruins of Peru and the dust-dry deserts of Chile, across the fertile range of Argentina and the carnival-infested streets of Rio, David Childress seeks the unknown, the undetermined, the secretive and the source of strange rumors; of vanished cities and twelve-foot-tall giants; and though he finds relatively little in the way of closure for the mysteries presented in _Lost Cities and Ancient Mysteries of South America_, one must remember it is the trip, not the destination, that buoys the author along...and for the casual reader, there is much to learn.
Despite his hyperbolic claims, Childress is definitely not an archeologist, a profession that tends to be dry, dusty, and for the most part dull-rather, he is a shoestring traveler with a yen for history and adventure. Which suits this material fine: instead of a `professional' report detailing one particular society as it lived and co-existed in its environment, Childress' breezy travelogue takes us through a dozen different societies, ancient and modern, with a fair amount of speculation that most academics wouldn't touch with a ten foot pole: the lost continents of Atlantis and Mu and how they relate to the rise of Inca civilization; supposed alien visitors; Amazon dinosaurs still on the prowl; a tunnel system spanning the American continent; a half-dozen myths of missing gold-hordes... nothing here that would impress the professor, but it certainly is an entertaining read, and the theories about South America's ancient colonies, including the Irish (!), Egyptians and Romans, are fun to ponder over.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By William Johnston VINE VOICE on April 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
This was the first book I read in Childress' "Lost Cities" series, every single one of which is impossible to put down. It is an incredible journey of a man's attempt to unite myth and fact and propose new explanations for historical events and archaeological enigmas. I cannot imagine anyone but the most jaded and cynical reader not enjoying this, regardless of whether you agree with the author's hypotheses or not. I will say though that if you are an officer in the Grammar Police it will drive you crazy at times. I hesitate to blame the author, however. I suspect that if the books in this series had an editor, which seems unlikely, than that person should have chosen another profession. If you are the type that cannot get beyond that then perhaps you should avoid the book but for anyone looking for a highly entertaining, thought-provoking take on history, travel and archaeology do not hesitate to buy every single book in this series.
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14 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Krayman on June 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is one of the worst written I have ever encountered. The ideas and concepts are interesting--the title and the photos are inviting. But the breezy style that wastes so much space on insignificant detail of the authors travels is just space filler. And the grammatical and spelling mistakes are just unforgiveable. I just cannot read something that has multiple, numerous mistakes throughout the book--you cannot escape them, and they are so blatant and numerous that the detract from thinking about the subject matter.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By George Erikson on September 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
Childress leaves almost no stone unturned as he leads the reader into unknown worlds in a personal quest to encounter and document the lost cities, pyramids, and megaliths of South and Central America. The ones he missed are the perfect spherical stones of Costa Rica documented in the AUP publication ATLANTIS IN AMERICA: NAVIGATORS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD.
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